These pages represent the work of an amateur researcher and should not be used as a sole source by any other researcher. Few primary sources have been available. Corrections and contributions are encouraged and welcomed. -- Karen (Johnson) Fish

Descendants of FULK the Red (c.870-c.942)


First Generation  Next


1. Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou,1 son of Ingelger I, Comté d'Anjou et Vicomté d'Orléans and Aelinde, de Gastinois, was born about 870 in <Anjou, France>, died about 942 in Anjou, (France) about age 72, and was buried in Châteauneuf, Église Saint-Martin. Another name for Foulques was Fulk "the Red" Count of Anjou.

Foulques married Roscille de Lochar,2 daughter of Garnier de Lochar, Seigneur Villandry et la Haie and Unknown,. Roscille was born about 874 in France.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 2 M    i. Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou 3 died on 11 Nov 958 in Tours, Touraine (Indre-et-Loire), France.

+ 3 F    ii. Adèle, d'Anjou 4 was born about 924 in <Vexin>, Normandy, France.

previous  Second Generation  Next



2. Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou 3 (Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died on 11 Nov 958 in Tours, Touraine (Indre-et-Loire), France. Another name for Foulques was Fulk II "the Good" Count of Anjou.

Death Notes: May have died in Anjou.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Fulk II of Anjou :

Fulk II of Anjou (died November 11 , 958 ), son of Fulk the Red , was count of Anjou from 941 to 958 . He was often at war with the Bretons . He seems to have been a man of culture, a poet and an artist. In 958 he was succeeded by Geoffrey Greymantle .
Fulk II died at Tours . By his spouse, Gerberge of Maine , daughter of Hervé Count of Maine, he had several children:
Adelais of Anjou , married five times
Geoffrey I , Count of Anjou, married Adelaide of Vermandois
Bouchard IV, Count of Vendome , married Elizabeth of Vendome; their daughter, Elizabeth married her cousin, Geoffrey I's son, Fulk the Black , only to be burnt at the stake by her husband in her wedding dress.

Foulques married Gerberga, of Maine, daughter of Hervé, Count of Maine and Unknown,. Another name for Gerberga was Gerberge of Maine.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Fulk II of Anjou


Children from this marriage were:

+ 4 F    i. Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou 5 was born about 947 and died in 1026 about age 79.

+ 5 M    ii. Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou 6 was born about 938 in Anjou, (France) and died on 21 Jul 987 in Anjou, (France) about age 49.

3. Adèle, d'Anjou 4 (Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 924 in <Vexin>, Normandy, France.

Adèle married Gauthier I Vexin, Count of Vexin 7 about 944. Gauthier was born about 919 in <Vexin>, Normandy, France and died about 948 about age 29.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 6 M    i. Gauthier II Vexin, Count of Vexin 7 was born about 944 in <Vexin>, Normandy, France and died in 1027 about age 83.

previous  Third Generation  Next



4. Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou 5 (Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 947 and died in 1026 about age 79. Other names for Adelaide were Adelais of Anjou and Alice of Anjou.

Research Notes: She may hav e had a sister named Blanche.
---
Second wife of William I of Provence. He was her 4th husband.

From Wikipedia - Adelaide of Anjou :

Adelaide[1] (c. 947 -1026 ),[2] called the White,[3] was the daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine . She was therefore the sister of Geoffrey Greymantle . She was married five times to some of France 's most important noblemen.

Her first marriage, probably before 960, was to Stephen, Viscount of Gévaudan . Her second marriage was to Raymond III , Count of Toulouse and Prince of Gothia , in 975. He died in 978.
In 982, she married Louis , the young son of Lothair of France , and the two were jointly crowned Monarchs of Aquitaine on the same day at Brioude . The large difference in age between the spouses was cause for a quick divorce in 984.

She fled then to Arles , where she contracted, against papal advice, a marriage with William I of Provence in 984. She gave him a daughter, Constance of Arles , who later married Robert II of France .
Her final marriage was to Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy .

Notes
^
Variously given as Alice, Adelais, Adalais, or Azalais.
^ Adélaïde Blanche d'Anjou
^ "la Blanche."

Adelaide married William II, Count of Arles and Provence,8 son of Boso II, Count of Provence, Avignon & Arles and Constance, of Provence, in 984. William was born about 950 and died after 29 Aug 993. Other names for William were Guillaume II Count of Arles, Count of Provence and William I "the Liberator" of Provence.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - William I of Provence :

William I (c. 950 - 993 , after 29 August ), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979 , he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II , sons of Boso II of Arles , both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.
In 980 , he was installed as Count of Arles . His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet . At the Battle of Tourtour in 973 , with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos , he definitively routed the Saracens , chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône , which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy . Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With the Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble , he repopulated the Dauphiny and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber 's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae .

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon , where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians . He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors.

Marriage and issue
He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was:
William II of Provence
He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984 , Adelaide of Anjou , daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine , and their daughter was:
Constance of Arles (973 - 1034), married Robert II of France

Sources
Lewis, Archibald R. The Development of Southern French and Catalan Society, 718-1050 . University of Texas Press: Austin, 1965.

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Provence: 979-993.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 7 F    i. Constance, of Provence 9 was born about 986, died on 25 Jul 1032 in Melun, France about age 46, and was buried in St. Denis Basilica, Paris, (Île-de-France), France.

5. Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou 6 (Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 938 in Anjou, (France) and died on 21 Jul 987 in Anjou, (France) about age 49. Other names for Geoffroi were Geoffrey "Greymantle" Count of Anjou, Geoffrey I "Grisgonelle" Count of Anjou, and Geoffrey I Grisgonelle.

Research Notes: Second husband of Adelaide of Vermandois,

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Geoffroi married Adelaide, of Vermandois,10 daughter of Robert, of Vermandois, Count of Trois and Meaux and Adélaide, de Bourgogne, on 2 Mar 951 in Anjou, France. Adelaide was born in 950 in Vermand, Picardy, France and died 12 Mar 975 or 978 in Châlons-sur-Saône, Saône-et-Loire, France at age 25.

Marriage Notes: Kevin Bradford has m. 979. Seems too late.

Birth Notes: Kevin Bradford has b. 950, as does Ancestral Roots Line 118-20.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 8 F    i. Ermengarde, of Anjou 11 was born about 952 in <Anjou, France> and died on 27 Jun 992 about age 40.

+ 9 M    ii. Fulk III "the Black", of Maine, Count of Anjou 12 died on 21 Jun 1040.

+ 10 F    iii. Gerberge, d'Anjou .13

6. Gauthier II Vexin, Count of Vexin 7 (Adèle, d'Anjou3, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 944 in <Vexin>, Normandy, France and died in 1027 about age 83. Another name for Gauthier was Gautier II "le Blanc" Vexin Count of Vexin.

Gauthier married Alix Senlis,7 daughter of Bormard de Senlis and Unknown, in 974. Alix was born about 944 in Île-de-France, France. Another name for Alix was Adele Senlis.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 11 F    i. Alix de Vexin 7 was born about 970 in <Mellent>, Normandy, France.

previous  Fourth Generation  Next



7. Constance, of Provence 9 (Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 986, died on 25 Jul 1032 in Melun, France about age 46, and was buried in St. Denis Basilica, Paris, (Île-de-France), France. Other names for Constance were Constance of Arles and Gisant of Arles.

Research Notes: Third wife of Robert II of France.

From Wikipedia - Constance of Arles :

Constance of Arles (also known as Constance of Provence) (986 - July 25 , 1034 ) was the third wife and queen of King Robert II of France . She was the daughter of William I , count of Provence and great-grandson of Charles-Constantine ; and Adelais of Anjou , daughter of Fulk II of Anjou . She was the sister of Count William II of Provence .

In 1003 , she was married to King Robert, after his divorce from his second wife, Bertha of Burgundy . The marriage was stormy; Bertha's family opposed her, and Constance was despised for importing her Provençal kinfolk. Robert's friend, Hugh of Beauvais, tried to convince the king to repudiate her in 1007 . Constance's response was to have Beauvais murdered by the knights of her kinsman, Fulk Nerra . In 1010 Robert even went to Rome, accompanied by his former wife Bertha, to seek permission to divorce Constance and remarry Bertha. Constance encouraged her sons to revolt against their father, and then favored her younger son, Robert, over her elder son, Henri.

During the famous trial of Herefast de Crepon (who was alleged to be involved with a heretical sect of canons, nuns, and clergy in 1022 [1]), the crowd outside the church in Orleans became so unruly that, according to Moore:
At the king's command, Queen Constance stood before the doors of the Church, to prevent the common people from killing them inside the Church, and they were expelled from the bosom of the Church. As they were being driven out, the queen struck out the eye of Stephen, who had once been her confessor, with the staff which she carried in her hand.

The symbolism, or reality, of putting an eye out is used often in medieval accounts to show the ultimate sin of breaking of one's oath, whether it be heresy, or treason to ones lordship, or in this case both. Stephen's eye was put out by the hand of a Queen wielding a staff (royal scepters were usually tipped with a cross) thus symbolically providing justice for the treasoned lord on earth and in heaven.

Constance and Robert had seven children:
Advisa, Countess of Auxerre, (c.1003-after 1063), married Count Renaud I of Nevers
Hugh Magnus, co-king (1007 -September 17 , 1025 )
Henri (May 4 , 1008 -August 4 , 1060 )
Adela, Countess of Contenance (1009 -June 5 , 1063 ), married (1) Duke Richard III of Normandy (2) Count Baldwin V of Flanders
Robert I, Duke of Burgundy (1011 -March 21 , 1076 )
Eudes (1013 -1056 )
Constance (1014 -unknown), married Manasses de Dammartin

At Constance's urging, her eldest son Hugh Magnus was crowned co-king alongside his father in 1017 . Hugh Magnus demanded his parents share power with him, and rebelled against his father in 1025 . He died suddenly later that year, an exile and a fugitive. Robert and Constance quarrelled over which of their surviving sons should inherit the throne; Robert favored their second son Henri , while Constance favored their third son, Robert . Despite his mother's protests, Henry was crowned in 1027 . Fulbert, bishop of Chartres wrote a letter claiming that he was "frightened away" from the consecration of Henry "by the savagery of his mother, who is quite trustworthy when she promises evil."

Constance encouraged her sons to rebel, and Henri and Robert began attacking and pillaging the towns and castles belonging to their father. Robert attacked Burgundy , the duchy he had been promised but had never received, and Henry seized Dreux . At last King Robert agreed to their demands and peace was made which lasted until the king's death.

King Robert died in 1031 , and soon Constance was at odds with both her elder son, Henri , and her younger son Robert . Constance seized her dower lands and refused to surrender them. Henri fled to Normandy, where he received aid, weapons, and soldiers from his brother Robert. He returned to besiege his mother at Poissy , but Constance escaped to Pontoise . She only surrendered when Henri began the siege of Le Puiset and swore to slaughter all the inhabitants.

Constance died in 1034 , and was buried beside her husband Robert at Saint-Denis Basilica .



Constance married Robert II "the Pious", King of France,14 son of Hugh Capet, King of France and Adelaide, de Poitou, in 998. Robert was born on 27 Mar 972 in Orléans, Orléanais, (Loiret), France and died on 20 Jul 1031 in Meulan, Normandy, France at age 59. Other names for Robert were Robert Sanctus King of France, Robert Capet Sanctus and King of France.

Death Notes: Melun, France?

Research Notes: Count of Paris, King of France

From Wikipedia - Robert II of France:

Robert II (27 March 972 - 20 July 1031 ), called the Pious or the Wise, was King of France from 996 until his death. The second reigning member of the House of Capet , he was born in Orléans to Hugh Capet and Adelaide of Aquitaine .

Co-rule with father
Immediately after his own coronation, Robert's father Hugh began to push for the coronation of Robert. "The essential means by which the early Capetians were seen to have kept the throne in their family was through the association of the eldest surviving son in the royalty during the father's lifetime," Andrew W. Lewis has observed, in tracing the phenomenon in this line of kings who lacked dynastic legitimacy.[1] Hugh's claimed reason was that he was planning an expedition against the Moorish armies harassing Borrel II of Barcelona , an invasion which never occurred, and that the stability of the country necessitated a co-king, should he die while on expedition.[2] Ralph Glaber , however, attributes Hugh's request to his old age and inability to control the nobility.[3] Modern scholarship has largely imputed to Hugh the motive of establishing a dynasty against the claims of electoral power on the part of the aristocracy, but this is not the typical view of contemporaries and even some modern scholars have been less sceptical of Hugh's "plan" to campaign in Spain.[4] Robert was eventually crowned on 30 December 987. A measure of Hugh's success is that when Hugh died in 996, Robert continued to reign without any succession dispute, but during his long reign actual royal power dissipated into the hands of the great territorial magnates.
Robert had begun to take on active royal duties with his father in the early 990s. In 991, he helped his father prevent the French bishops from trekking to Mousson in the Kingdom of Germany for a synod called by Pope John XV , with whom Hugh was then in disagreement.

Marital problems

As early as 989, having been rebuffed in his search for a Byzantine princess,[5]Hugh Capet arranged for Robert to marry the recently-widowed daughter of Berengar II of Italy , Rozala , who took the name of Susannah upon becoming Queen.[6] She was many years his senior. She was the widow of Arnulf II of Flanders , with whom she had children, the oldest of whom was of age to assume the offices of count of Flanders. Robert divorced her within a year of his father's death. He tried instead to marry Bertha , daughter of Conrad of Burgundy , around the time of his father's death. She was a widow of Odo I of Blois , but was also Robert's cousin. For reasons of consanguinity , Pope Gregory V refused to sanction the marriage, and Robert was excommunicated. After long negotiations with Gregory's successor, Sylvester II , the marriage was annulled.
Finally, in 1001, Robert entered into his final and longest-lasting marriage: to Constance of Arles , the daughter of William I of Provence . She was an ambitious and scheming woman, who made life miserable for her husband by encouraging her sons to revolt against their father.

Piety
Robert, however, despite his marital problems, was a very devout Catholic, hence his sobriquet "the Pious." He was musically inclined, being a composer, chorister, and poet, and making his palace a place of religious seclusion, where he conducted the matins and vespers in his royal robes. However, to contemporaries, Robert's "piety", resulted from his lack of toleration for heretics: he harshly punished them.

Children
Robert had no children from his short-lived marriage to Susanna. His illegal marriage to Bertha gave him one stillborn son in 999, but only Constance gave him surviving children:[7]
Constance, married Manasses de Dammartin
Adele of France, married Renauld I, Count of Nevers on 25 January 1016 and had issue.
Hugh Magnus , co-king (1017-1025)
Henry I , successor
Robert , became Duke of Burgundy
Odo (1013-c.1056), who may have been mentally retarded and died after his brother's failed invasion of Normandy
Adela (d. 1079), married firstly Richard III of Normandy and secondly Baldwin V of Flanders .
Robert also left an illegitimate son: Rudolph, Bishop of Bourges

Sources
Lewis, Andrew W. "Anticipatory Association of the Heir in Early Capetian France. " The American Historical Review, Vol. 83, No. 4. (Oct., 1978), pp 906-927.
* Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 53-21, 101-21, 107-20, 107-21, 108-21, 128-21, 141-21, 141A-21, 146-19, 162-20, 185-2.
Jessee, W. Scott. A missing Capetian princess: Advisa, daughter of King Robert II of France (Medieval Prosopography), 1990

Noted events in his life were:

• King of France: 1 Jan 996-1031.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 12 F    i. Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre 15 was born about 1003 and died about 1063 about age 60.

+ 13 M    ii. Hugh Magnus, of France was born in 1007 and died on 17 Sep 1025 at age 18.

+ 14 M    iii. Henry I, of France 16 was born on 4 May 1008 in Reims, Marne, Champagne, France, died on 4 Aug 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie, France at age 52, and was buried in St. Denis Basilica, Paris, (Île-de-France), France.

+ 15 F    iv. Adele Capet, Princess of France 17 was born about 1009 and died about 8 Jan 1079 in Messines Monastery, Messines (Mesen), West Flanders, (Belgium) about age 70.

+ 16 M    v. Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy 18 was born about 1011 and died on 21 Mar 1076 about age 65.

+ 17 M    vi. Odo was born in 1013 and died about 1056 about age 43.

+ 18 F    vii. Constance Capet 19 was born about 1014 in France.

8. Ermengarde, of Anjou 11 (Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 952 in <Anjou, France> and died on 27 Jun 992 about age 40. Other names for Ermengarde were Ermangarde d'Anjou and Ermengarde d'Anjou.

Research Notes: 2nd wife of Robert the Old.

Ermengarde married Conan I, Count of Rennes, Duke of Brittany,20 son of Judicaël, Comté de Rennes and Gerberge, in 980 in Rennes, Anjou, France. Conan was born about 927 in <Bretagne, France> and died on 29 Jun 992 in Conquereuil, Bretagne, France about age 65. Other names for Conan were Conan de Bretagne, Conan "le Tort" Duc de Bretagne, Comté de Rennes, and Conan I Duke of Bretagne.

Marriage Notes: May have been married in 973.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 19 M    i. Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne 21 was born about 971 in Rennes, Anjou, France and died on 20 Nov 1008 about age 37.

+ 20 F    ii. Judith, of Brittany 22 was born about 982 in <Bretagne, (France)> and died on 16 Jun 1017 in Normandy, France about age 35.

Ermengarde next married Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy,18 son of Robert II "the Pious", King of France and Constance, of Provence, about 1048. Robert was born about 1011 and died on 21 Mar 1076 about age 65. Other names for Robert were Robert I Duke of Burgundy and Robert Capet Duke of Burgundy.

Research Notes: Duke of Burgundy from 1032 to his death in 1076.

From Wikipedia - Robert I, Duke of Burgundy :

Robert I Capet (1011 - March 21 , 1076 ) was duke of Burgundy between 1032 to his death. Robert was son of King Robert II of France and brother of Henry I .
In 1025 , with the death of his eldest brother Hugh Magnus, he and Henry rebelled against their father and defeated him, forcing him back to Paris . In 1031 , after the death of his father the king, Robert participated in a rebellion against his brother, in which he was supported by his mother, Queen Constance d'Arles . Peace was only achieved when Robert was given Burgundy (1032 ).

Throughout his reign, he was little more than a robber baron who had no control over his own vassals, whose estates he often plundered, especially those of the Church. He seized the income of the diocese of Autun and the wine of the canons of Dijon . He burgled the abbey of St-Germain at Auxerre . In 1055 , he repudiated his wife, Helie of Semur, and assassinated her brother Joceran and murdered her father, his father-in-law, Lord Dalmace I of Semur , with his own hands. In that same year, the bishop of Langres , Harduoin, refused to dedicate the church of Sennecy so as not "to be exposed to the violence of the duke."
His first son, Hugh, died in battle at a young age and his second son, Henry , also predeceased him. He was succeeded by Henry's eldest son, his grandson, Hugh I .

Family
He married his first wife, Helie of Semur , about 1033 , and repudiated her in 1055. Robert and Helie had five children:
Hugh (1034-1059), killed in battle
Henry (1035-ca.1074)
Robert (1040-1113), poisoned; married Violante of Sicily, daughter of Roger I of Sicily
Simon (1045-1087)
Constance (1046-1093), married Alfonso VI of Castile
From his second wife, Ermengarde of Anjou, daughter of Fulk III of Anjou , he had one daughter:
Hildegard (c.1056-1104), married Duke William VIII of Aquitaine

Sources
Gwatking, H. M. , Whitney, J. P. , et al. Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III-Germany and the Western Empire. Cambridge University Press : London , 1930 .

9. Fulk III "the Black", of Maine, Count of Anjou 12 (Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died on 21 Jun 1040.

Fulk married Hildegarde 23 after 1000. Hildegarde died on 1 Apr 1040 in Jerusalem, Palestine.

Research Notes: Second wife of Fulk III


The child from this marriage was:

+ 21 F    i. Ermengarde, of Anjou 24 was born about 1018 and died on 21 Mar 1076 about age 58.

10. Gerberge, d'Anjou 13 (Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Gerberge married Guillaume d'Angoulême,25 son of Arnaud "Mancer" d'Angoulême and Raingarde,. Guillaume died on 6 Apr 1028 in Angoulême and was buried after 6 Apr 1028 in Angoulême Saint-Cybard.

Death Notes: Murdered.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/4566.htm :
Web Reference: Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands, Guillaume d'Angoulême .
Guillaume d'Angoulême was the son of Arnaud "Mancer" comté d'Angoulême and his first wife, Raingarde, sister of Bellus Homo. He succeeded his father as count in 988. He married, sometimes before 100, Gerberge d'Anjou, daughter of Geoffroy I "Grisgonelle" comté d'Anjou and his wife Adele de Meaux or Vermandois. Guillaume was murdered, 6 Apr 1028.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 22 M    i. Geoffroy d'Angoulême 26 died in Dec 1048 in Angoulême.

11. Alix de Vexin 7 (Gauthier II Vexin, Count of Vexin6, Adèle, d'Anjou3, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 970 in <Mellent>, Normandy, France.

Alix married Robert, Count of Meulan,7 son of Robert I Meulent and Unknown,. Robert was born about 965 in <Mellent>, Normandy, France.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 23 M    i. Waleran I, Count of Meulan was born about 990 and died about 1069 about age 79.

previous  Fifth Generation  Next



12. Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre 15 (Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1003 and died about 1063 about age 60.

Adèle married Renaud I, Count of Nevers 27 about 1015. Renaud died on 29 May 1040.

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Nevers: 1000-1040.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 24 M    i. William I, Count of Nevers 28 was born about 1030 and died on 20 Jun 1100 about age 70.

13. Hugh Magnus, of France (Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1007 and died on 17 Sep 1025 at age 18.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Hugh Magnus of France :

Hugh (II) Magnus of France (French : Hugues le Grand) (1007 - 17 September 1025 ) was co-King of France under his father, Robert II , from 1017 until his death in 1025 . He was a member of the House of Capet , a son of Robert II by his third wife, Constance of Arles .
The first Capetian King of France, Hugh Capet , had ensured his family's succession to the throne by having his son, Robert II, crowned and accepted as King during his own lifetime; father and son had ruled together as King thenceforth until Hugh Capet's death. Robert II, when his son was old enough, determined to do the same. Hugh Magnus was thus crowned King of France on /19 June 1017 ,[1] and thenceforth ruled beside his father. However, when older, he rebelled against Robert.
Hugh is said to have been married (or betrothed) before his death to Halwisa (Hawisa?) or Elisabeth d'Avoye (the daughter of Henri l'Oiseteur), who later married Hamon Dapifer Crevecouer, Count of Corbeil.
Hugh died, perhaps of a fall from his horse,[2] at Compiègne in 1025/1026 while preparing a rebellion against his father, aged around 18 years old.[1]
Rodulfus Glaber was fulsome in his praise of the young king, writing: "My pen cannot express all of the great and good qualities that he showed...in all things he was better than the best. No elegy can ever equal his merits."
As a King of France, he would technically be Hugh II of France; however, he is rarely referred to as such.

References
^ a b Thys, Laurent, Histoire du Moyen Âge français, p. 88.
^ New Cambridge Medieval History, IV:124.
The Origins of Some Angelo-Norman Families by Lewis C. Loyd, Page 50.
The Doomesday Monachorum of Christ Church Canterbury, Page 55-6.

Sources
Heraldica



14. Henry I, of France 16 (Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 4 May 1008 in Reims, Marne, Champagne, France, died on 4 Aug 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie, France at age 52, and was buried in St. Denis Basilica, Paris, (Île-de-France), France.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Henry I of France :

Henry I (4 May 1008 - 4 August 1060 ) was King of France from 1031 to his death. The royal demesne of France reached its lowest point in terms of size during his reign and for this reason he is often seen as emblematic of the weakness of the early Capetians . This is not entirely agreed upon, however, as other historians regard him as a strong but realistic king, who was forced to conduct a policy mindful of the limitations of the French monarchy.

A member of the House of Capet , Henry was born in Reims , the son of King Robert II (972-1031) and Constance of Arles (986-1034). He was crowned King of France at the Cathedral in Reims on May 14 , 1027 , in the Capetian tradition, while his father still lived. He had little influence and power until he became sole ruler on his father's death.

The reign of Henry I, like those of his predecessors, was marked by territorial struggles. Initially, he joined his brother Robert , with the support of their mother, in a revolt against his father (1025 ). His mother, however, supported Robert as heir to the old king, on whose death Henry was left to deal with his rebel sibling. In 1032 , he placated his brother by giving him the duchy of Burgundy which his father had given him in 1016 .

In an early strategic move, Henry came to the rescue of his very young nephew-in-law, the newly appointed Duke William of Normandy (who would go on to become William the Conqueror ), to suppress a revolt by William's vassals. In 1047 , Henry secured the dukedom for William in their decisive victory over the vassals at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen .

A few years later, when William, who was cousin to King Edward the Confessor of England (1042-66), married Matilda , the daughter of the count of Flanders , Henry feared William's potential power. In 1054 , and again in 1057 , Henry went to war to try to conquer Normandy from William, but on both occasions he was defeated. Despite his efforts, Henry I's twenty-nine-year reign saw feudal power in France reach its pinnacle.

Henry had three meetings with Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor -all at Ivois . In early 1043 , he met him to discuss the marriage of the emperor with Agnes of Poitou , the daughter of Henry's vassal. In October 1048 , the two Henries met again, but the subject of this meeting eludes us. The final meeting took place in May 1056 . It concerned disputes over Lorraine. The debate over the duchy became so heated that the king of France challenged his German counterpart to single combat. The emperor, however, was not so much a warrior and he fled in the night. But Henry did not get Lorraine.

King Henry I died on August 4 , 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie , France, and was interred in Saint Denis Basilica . He was succeeded by his son, Philip I of France , who was 7 at the time of his death; for six years Henry I's Queen, Anne of Kiev , ruled as regent.

He was also Duke of Burgundy from 1016 to 1032 , when he abdicated the duchy to his brother Robert Capet .

Marriages and family
Henry I was betrothed to Matilda, the daughter of the Emperor Conrad II (1024-39), but she died prematurely in 1034 . Henry I then married Matilda , daughter of Liudolf, Margrave of Frisia, but she died in 1044 , following a Caesarean section. Casting further afield in search of a third wife, Henry I married Anne of Kiev on May 19 , 1051 . They had four children:
Philip I (May 23, 1052 - July 30, 1108)
Emma (1054-?)
Robert (c. 1055-c. 1060)
Hugh the Great (1057-1102)

Noted events in his life were:

• King of France: 1031-1060.

• Count of Paris:

Henry married Anne, of Kiev,29 daughter of Yaroslav I, of Kiev and Ingegerd Olofsdotter, of Sweden, on 19 May 1051 in Cathedral de Rheims, Rheims, France. Anne was born between 1024 and 1032, died in 1075, and was buried in Villiers Abbey, La-Ferte-Alais, Essonne, (Île-de-France), France. Other names for Anne were Agnes of Kiev, Anna of Kiev, and Anna Yaroslavna.

Marriage Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 241-6 has m. 20 Jan 1044 or 1045. Wikipedia has 19 May 1051. Was 1044/45 the betrothal?

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots line 241-6 has d. aft. 1075

Research Notes: 3rd wife of Henry I of France.

From Wikipedia - Anne of Kiev :

Anne of Kiev or Anna Yaroslavna (between 1024 and 1032 - 1075 ), daughter of Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife Ingegerd Olofsdotter , was the queen consort of France as the wife of Henry I , and regent for her son Philip I .

After the death of his first wife, Matilda, King Henry searched the courts of Europe for a suitable bride, but could not locate a princess who was not related to him within illegal degrees of kinship. At last he sent an embassy to distant Kiev , which returned with Anne (also called Agnes or Anna). Anne and Henry were married at the cathedral of Reims on May 19 , 1051 .

They had three sons:

Philip (May 23 , 1052 - July 30 , 1108 ) - Anne is credited with bringing the name Philip to Western Europe . She imported this Greek name (Philippos, from philos (love) and hippos (horse), meaning "the one that love horses") from her Eastern Orthodox culture.
Hugh (1057 - October 18 , 1102 ) - called the Great or Magnus, later Count of Crépi, who married the heiress of Vermandois and died on crusade in Tarsus , Cilicia .
Robert (c. 1055 -c. 1060 )

For six years after Henry's death in 1060 , she served as regent for Philip, who was only seven at the time. She was the first queen of France to serve as regent. Her co-regent was Count Baldwin V of Flanders . Anne was a literate woman, rare for the time, but there was some opposition to her as regent on the grounds that her mastery of French was less than fluent.
A year after the king's death, Anne, acting as regent, took a passionate fancy for Count Ralph III of Valois , a man whose political ambition encouraged him to repudiate his wife to marry Anne in 1062 . Accused of adultery, Ralph's wife appealed to Pope Alexander II , who excommunicated the couple. The young king Philip forgave his mother, which was just as well, since he was to find himself in a very similar predicament in the 1090s . Ralph died in September 1074 , at which time Anne returned to the French court. She died in 1075 , was buried at Villiers Abbey , La-Ferte-Alais , Essonne and her obits were celebrated on September 5 .

Sources
Bauthier, Robert-Henri. Anne de Kiev reine de France et la politique royale au Xe siècle, revue des Etudes Slaves, Vol. 57, 1985
Retrieved from ""


Children from this marriage were:

+ 25 M    i. Philip I, of France was born on 23 May 1052 and died on 30 Jul 1108 at age 56.

+ 26 F    ii. Emma 30 was born in 1054.

+ 27 M    iii. Robert was born about 1055 and died about 1060 about age 5.

+ 28 M    iv. Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France 31 was born in 1057 and died on 18 Oct 1102 in Tarsus, Cilicia, (Turkey) at age 45.

15. Adele Capet, Princess of France 17 (Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1009 and died about 8 Jan 1079 in Messines Monastery, Messines (Mesen), West Flanders, (Belgium) about age 70. Other names for Adele were Adèle of France, Countess of Contentin, Adele "the Holy" of Messines, Aelis of France, and Countess of Contentin.

Research Notes: Second daughter of Robert the Pious and Constance of Arles.

From Wikipedia - Adela of France, Countess of Flanders :

Adela Capet, Adèle of France or Adela of Flanders[1], known also as Adela the Holy or Adela of Messines; (1009 - 8 January 1079 , Messines ) was the second daughter of Robert II (the Pious), and Constance of Arles . As dowry to her future husband, she received from her father the title of Countess of Corbie.

Her family
She was a member of the House of Capet , the rulers of France. As the wife of Baldwin V , she was Countess of Flanders from 1036 to 1067.

She married first 1027 Richard III Duke of Normandy (997 † 1027). They never had children.

As a widow, she remarried in 1028 in Paris to Baldwin V of Flanders (1012 † 1067). Their children were:
Baldwin VI of Flanders , (1030 † 1070)
Matilda of Flanders (1032 † 1083). In 1053 she married William Duke of Normandy , the future king of England
Robert I of Flanders , (1033-1093)
Henry of Flanders (c. 1035)
Sir Richard of Flanders (c. 1050-1105)

Political influence
Adèle's influence lay mainly in her family connections. On the death of her brother, Henry I of France, the guardianship of his seven-year-old son Philip I fell jointly on his widow, Ann of Kiev , and on his brother-in-law, Adela's husband, so that from 1060 to 1067, they were Regents of France.

Church influence
Adèle had an especially great interest in Baldwin V's church-reform politics and was behind her husband's founding of several collegiate churches . Directly or indirectly, she was responsible for establishing the Colleges of Aire (1049), Lille (1050) and Harelbeke (1064) as well as the abbeys of Messines (1057) and Ename (1063). After Baldwin's death in 1067, she went to Rome, took the nun's veil from the hands of Pope Alexander II and retreated to the Benedictine convent of Messines, near Ypres . There she died, being buried at the same monastery. Her commemoration day is 8 September.

Adele married Baldwin V, de Lille, Count of Flanders,32 son of Baldwin IV "the Bearded", Count of Valenciennes & Count of Flanders and Ogive, de Luxembourg, in 1028 in Amiens. Baldwin was born in 1012 and died on 1 Sep 1067 in Lille, France at age 55. Another name for Baldwin was Baldwin V of Flanders.

Marriage Notes: May have been married in Paris.

Research Notes: Second husband of Adele de France

From Wikipedia - Baldwin V, Count of Flanders :

Baldwin V of Flanders (died 1 September 1067) was Count of Flanders from 1035 until his death.

He was the son of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders , who died in 1035.

History
In 1028 Baldwin married Adèle of France in Amiens, daughter of King Robert II of France ; at her instigation he rebelled against his father but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death.

During a long war (1046-1056) as an ally of Godfrey the Bearded , Duke of Lorraine , against the Holy Roman Emperor Henry III , he initially lost Valenciennes to Hermann of Hainaut . However, when the latter died in 1051 Baldwin married his son Baldwin VI to Herman's widow Richildis and arranged that the sons of her first marriage were disinherited, thus de facto uniting the County of Hainaut with Flanders. Upon the death of Henry III this marriage was acknowledged by treaty by Agnes de Poitou , mother and regent of Henry IV .

From 1060 to 1067 Baldwin was the co-Regent with Anne of Kiev for his nephew-by-marriage Philip I of France , indicating the importance he had acquired in international politics.

Family
Baldwin and Adèle had five children:
Baldwin VI , 1030-1070
Matilda , c.1031-1083 who married William the Conqueror
Robert I of Flanders , c.1033-1093
Henry of Flanders c.1035
Sir Richard of Flanders c. 1050-1105

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Flanders: 1035-1067.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 29 M    i. Robert I, Count of Flanders 33 was born between 1029 and 1035 and died on 13 Oct 1093 in Kassel.

+ 30 F    ii. Matilda, of Flanders 34 was born about 1032 in Flanders, died on 2 Nov 1083 in Caen, Normandy, France about age 51, and was buried in Abbaye aux Dames, Caen, Normandy, France.

Adele next married Richard III, Duke of Normandy,35 son of Richard II, Duke of Normandy and Judith, of Brittany, on 10 Jan 1027. Richard was born about 997 and died on 6 Aug 1028 about age 31.

Death Notes: Died in 1027 or 1028.

Research Notes: Eldest son. First husband of Adele of France.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132A-23

From Wikipedia - Richard III, Duke of Normandy :

Richard III (997 - 1027) was the eldest son of Richard II , who died in 1027. Before succeeding his father, perhaps about 1020, he had been sent by his father in command of a large army, to attack bishop/count Hugh of Chalon in order to rescue his brother-in-law, Reginald , later Count of Burgundy , who the count/bishop had captured and imprisoned. He was betrothed to Adela, countess of Corbie (1009-June 5, 1063), second daughter of Robert II of France and Constance of Arles , but they never married.

After his father's death, he ruled the Duchy of Normandy only briefly, dying mysteriously, perhaps by poison, soon after his father. The duchy passed to his younger brother Robert I . Adela later married Baldwin V, Count of Flanders .

By unknown women, he had two known children:
Alice/Alix of Normandy who married Ranulf, Viscount of Bayeux.
Nicolas, the Lay Abbot of Rouen (b? - d. 27 Feb 1092). He helped his cousin, Duke William II the Conqueror with the contribution of 15 ships and 100 soldiers for the invasion of England in 1066.

Noted events in his life were:

• Duke of Normandy: 1026-1028.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 31 F    i. Judith, of Normandy 36 was born in 1028 and died on 4 Mar 1094 at age 66.

16. Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy 18 (Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1011 and died on 21 Mar 1076 about age 65. Other names for Robert were Robert I Duke of Burgundy and Robert Capet Duke of Burgundy.

Research Notes: Duke of Burgundy from 1032 to his death in 1076.

From Wikipedia - Robert I, Duke of Burgundy :

Robert I Capet (1011 - March 21 , 1076 ) was duke of Burgundy between 1032 to his death. Robert was son of King Robert II of France and brother of Henry I .
In 1025 , with the death of his eldest brother Hugh Magnus, he and Henry rebelled against their father and defeated him, forcing him back to Paris . In 1031 , after the death of his father the king, Robert participated in a rebellion against his brother, in which he was supported by his mother, Queen Constance d'Arles . Peace was only achieved when Robert was given Burgundy (1032 ).

Throughout his reign, he was little more than a robber baron who had no control over his own vassals, whose estates he often plundered, especially those of the Church. He seized the income of the diocese of Autun and the wine of the canons of Dijon . He burgled the abbey of St-Germain at Auxerre . In 1055 , he repudiated his wife, Helie of Semur, and assassinated her brother Joceran and murdered her father, his father-in-law, Lord Dalmace I of Semur , with his own hands. In that same year, the bishop of Langres , Harduoin, refused to dedicate the church of Sennecy so as not "to be exposed to the violence of the duke."
His first son, Hugh, died in battle at a young age and his second son, Henry , also predeceased him. He was succeeded by Henry's eldest son, his grandson, Hugh I .

Family
He married his first wife, Helie of Semur , about 1033 , and repudiated her in 1055. Robert and Helie had five children:
Hugh (1034-1059), killed in battle
Henry (1035-ca.1074)
Robert (1040-1113), poisoned; married Violante of Sicily, daughter of Roger I of Sicily
Simon (1045-1087)
Constance (1046-1093), married Alfonso VI of Castile
From his second wife, Ermengarde of Anjou, daughter of Fulk III of Anjou , he had one daughter:
Hildegard (c.1056-1104), married Duke William VIII of Aquitaine

Sources
Gwatking, H. M. , Whitney, J. P. , et al. Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III-Germany and the Western Empire. Cambridge University Press : London , 1930 .

Robert married Hélie,37 daughter of Dalmas I, Sire of Semur-en-Brionnais and Aremburge, about 1033. Hélie was born in 1016 and died 22 April after 1055 at age 39. Another name for Hélie was Eleanor.

Death Notes: Died a nun

Noted events in her life were:

• Repudiated: 1046.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 32 M    i. Henry, of Burgundy 38 was born about 1035 in <Bourgogne, Champagne>, France and died about 1071 about age 36.

+ 33 F    ii. Constance, of Burgundy 39 was born in 1046 and died in 1092 at age 46.

Robert next married Ermengarde, of Anjou,11 daughter of Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou and Adelaide, of Vermandois, about 1048. Ermengarde was born about 952 in <Anjou, France> and died on 27 Jun 992 about age 40. Other names for Ermengarde were Ermangarde d'Anjou and Ermengarde d'Anjou.

Research Notes: 2nd wife of Robert the Old.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 8)

Robert next married Hildegarde, of Metz.40

Research Notes: Third wife of Robert the Old.

17. Odo (Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1013 and died about 1056 about age 43.

Research Notes: May have been mentally retarded.

Source: Wikipedia - Robert II of France

18. Constance Capet 19 (Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1014 in France. Another name for Constance was Constance Princess of France.

Research Notes: Married Manasses de Dammartin per Wikipedia.

Source: Wikipedia - Robert II of France and Constance of Arles

Constance married Manasses Calva Asina de Rameru,41 son of Hilduin II de Rameru and Unknown, about 1032 in Orléans, Orléanais, (Loiret), France. Manasses was born about 1010 in <Dammartin-en-Goele, Seine-et-Marne>, France and died on 15 Nov 1057 in Bar-le-Duc, Meuse, Lorraine, France about age 47. Another name for Manasses was Manasses de Dammartin Count of Dammartin.

Death Notes: Was killed during the Siege of Bar-le-Duc.

Research Notes: Second husband of Beatrix of Hainaut


The child from this marriage was:

+ 34 M    i. Hugues de Dammartin, Count of Dammartin 42 was born about 1042 in <Dammartin-en-Goele, Seine-et-Marne>, France and died in 1103 about age 61.

19. Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne 21 (Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 971 in Rennes, Anjou, France and died on 20 Nov 1008 about age 37. Another name for Geoffroi was Geoffrey de Bretagne.

Birth Notes: May have been born in Bretagne, France.

Death Notes: Died during his return from a pilgrimage to Rome.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/4202.htm :
Geoffrey, duke of Brittany, married Hawise, daughter of Richard I, Duke of Normandy, and died in 1008, leaving two sons, Alan and Eudon. During their mother's lifetime the two brothers seem to have been joint rulers of Brittany, but on her death, on 21 February 1034, dissensions broke out between them; peace was restored by a settlement under which Eudon received a territory corresponding roughly to the dioceses of Dol, St. Mialo, St. Brieuc and Tréguier, reduced in the hands of his successors to the two last-named dioceses, while Alan retained the rest of Brittany. After the death of Alan in 1040 Eudon seized the government of Brittany to the exclusion of his nephew Conan, who recovered it in 1057. Eudon died 7 January 1079. He married Orguen, whose parentage is unknown.

~ Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, (Richmond) Vol. X, pp. 779-781

Geoffroi married Havlive, de Normandie,43 daughter of Richard I, Duke of Normandy and Gunnora, de Crepon, in 996 in Bretagne, France. Havlive was born about 976 in Normandy, France and died on 21 Feb 1034 in Évreux, Rouen, Seine-et-Maritime, France about age 58. Another name for Havlive was Hawise de Normandy.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 35 M    i. Geoffrey, de Bretagne 44 was born about 1001 in Bretagne, France.

+ 36 M    ii. Eudes, Comté de Bretagne 45 was born about 1008 in Rennes, Bretagne, Indre-et-Loire, (France) and died on 7 Jan 1079 about age 71.

20. Judith, of Brittany 22 (Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 982 in <Bretagne, (France)> and died on 16 Jun 1017 in Normandy, France about age 35. Another name for Judith was Judith de Bretagne.

Research Notes: First wife of Richard II. Founded abbey of Bernay, Normandy, abt 1026.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132A-22

From Wikipedia - Judith of Brittany :

Judith of Brittany (982 - 1017) was the daughter of Conan I, Duke of Brittany and the mother of Robert the Magnificent .

She was the first wife of Richard the Good, Duke of Normandy , whom she married in 996. They had six children:
Richard (c. 1002/4), duke of Normandy
Adelaide (c. 1003/5), married Renaud I, Count of Burgundy
Robert (c. 1005/7), duke of Normandy
William (c. 1007/9), monk at Fécamp , d. 1025
Eleanor (c. 1011/3), married to Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders
Matilda (c. 1013/5), nun at Fecamp, d. 1033

The duchess Judith died in 1017 and was buried in the abbey of Bernay, which she had founded.

Judith married Richard II, Duke of Normandy,46 son of Richard I, Duke of Normandy and Gunnora, de Crepon, about 996 in Normandy, France. Richard was born about 985 in Normandy, (France), died on 28 Aug 1027 in Fécamp, Normandy, France about age 42, and was buried in Fécamp, Normandy, France. Other names for Richard were Richard II 4th Duc de Normandie and Richard II "the Good" Duke of Normandy.

Birth Notes: FamilySearch and thepeerage.com have b. abt. 963.

Research Notes: Duke of Normandy 20 Nov. 996-1026.

From Wikipedia - Richard II, Duke of Normandy :

Richard II (born 23 August 963, in Normandy , France - 28 August 1027, in Normandy), called the Good, was the son and heir of Richard I the Fearless and Gunnora . He succeeded his father as Duke of Normandy in 996. Richard held his own against a peasant insurrection, and helped Robert II of France against the duchy of Burgundy . He also repelled an English attack on the Cotentin Peninsula that was led by Ethelred II of England. He pursued a reform of the Norman monasteries.

Richard attempted to improve relations with England through his sister's marriage to King Ethelred, but she was strongly disliked by the English. However, this connection later gave his grandson, William the Conqueror , part of his claim to the throne of England.

He married firstly (996) Judith (982-1017), daughter of Conan I of Brittany , by whom he had the following issue:
Richard (c. 1002/4), duke of Normandy
Adelaide (c. 1003/5), married Renaud I, Count of Burgundy
Robert (c. 1005/7), duke of Normandy
William (c. 1007/9), monk at Fécamp , d. 1025
Eleanor (c. 1011/3), married to Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders
Matilda (c. 1013/5), nun at Fecamp, d. 1033

Secondly he married Poppa of Envermeu, by whom he had the following issue:
Mauger (c. 1019), Archbishop of Rouen
William (c. 1020/5), count of Arques


Traditionally, Richard had a third wife named Astrid (Estritha), daughter of Sweyn Forkbeard , King of England , Denmark , and Norway , and Sigrid the Haughty . This is extremely unlikely, however, given the political situation.

Noted events in his life were:

• Duke of Normandy: 20 Nov 996.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 37 M    i. Richard III, Duke of Normandy 35 was born about 997 and died on 6 Aug 1028 about age 31.

+ 38 F    ii. Adelais, de Normandie 47 was born about 1007 in <Normandy, France> and died about 1037 in France about age 30.

+ 39 M    iii. Robert I, Duke of Normandy 48 was born about 1008 in Normandy, France and died on 22 Jul 1035 in Nicaea, Bythnia, (Turkey) about age 27.

21. Ermengarde, of Anjou 24 (Fulk III "the Black", of Maine, Count of Anjou9, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1018 and died on 21 Mar 1076 about age 58.

Ermengarde married Aubri-Geoffrey, Count of the Gâtinais,49 son of Geoffrey III, Count of the Gâtinais and Beatrix, of Mâcon, about 1035. Aubri-Geoffrey was born about 1013 in Orléanais, France and died on 11 Apr 1046 about age 33. Another name for Aubri-Geoffrey was Geoffroy Ferréol Count of the Gâtinais.

Death Notes: Death date may be 1 Apr. 1046

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of the Gâtinais: 1034-1043.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 40 M    i. Fulk IV "le Réchin", Count of Anjou 50 was born in 1043 in Anjou, France and died on 14 Apr 1109 at age 66.

22. Geoffroy d'Angoulême 26 (Gerberge, d'Anjou10, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in Dec 1048 in Angoulême. Another name for Geoffroy was Geoffroy d'Angoulême.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/4564.htm :
Web Reference: Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands, Geoffroy d'Angoulême .
Geoffroy d'Angoulême, son of Guillaume IV, comté d'Angoulême and his wife Gerberge d'Anjou. He succeeded his father in 1030, and married Petronille d'Archiac, dame d'Archiac et de Bouteville, daughter of Mainard "le Riche" Seigneur d'Archiac and his wife Udulgardis.

Geoffroy married Petronille d'Archiac, Dame de Bouteville.51 Petronille died before 24 Sep 1029 and was buried in Saint-Paul de Bouteville.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 41 M    i. Foulques "Taillefer", Comté d'Angoulême 52 died in 1087.

23. Waleran I, Count of Meulan (Alix de Vexin11, Gauthier II Vexin, Count of Vexin6, Adèle, d'Anjou3, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 990 and died about 1069 about age 79.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Roger de Beaumont (Waleran III) and Counts of Meulan (Waleran I)

Waleran married Oda de Conteville,53 daughter of Jean de Conteville and Unknown, about 1017 in France. Oda was born about 998 in Conteville, Seine Maritime, France.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 42 F    i. Adeline, of Meulan 54 was born about 1014 in <Pont-Audemer>, Normandy, France and died in 1081 about age 67.

+ 43 M    ii. Hugh, Count of Meulan .

previous  Sixth Generation  Next



24. William I, Count of Nevers 28 (Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1030 and died on 20 Jun 1100 about age 70.

William married Ermengarde,55 daughter of Renaud, Count of Tonnerre and Unknown, in 1045.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 44 M    i. Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre 56 was born about 1047 in <Nevers, Nievre>, France and died on 5 Aug 1089 about age 42.

25. Philip I, of France (Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 23 May 1052 and died on 30 Jul 1108 at age 56.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Anne of Kiev:

Philip (May 23 , 1052 - July 30 , 1108 ) - Anne is credited with bringing the name Philip to Western Europe . She imported this Greek name (Philippos, from philos (love) and hippos (horse), meaning "the one that love horses") from her Eastern Orthodox culture.

26. Emma 30 (Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1054.

27. Robert (Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1055 and died about 1060 about age 5.

Research Notes: Source: Anne of Kiev. Died in childhood

28. Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France 31 (Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1057 and died on 18 Oct 1102 in Tarsus, Cilicia, (Turkey) at age 45. Other names for Hugh were Hugh of Vermandois, Hugues "le Grand" de France, Hugh Magnus, and Hugh de Vermandois.

Death Notes: Died on crusade.

Research Notes: Duke of France and Burgundy, Marquis of Orleans, Count of Amiens, Chaumont, Paris, Valois, and Vermandois. He was a leader of the First Crusade.

First husband of Adelaide de Vermandois.

From Wikipedia - Hugh of Vermandois :

Hugh of Vermandois (1053 - October 18 , 1101 ), was son to King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev , and the younger brother of King Philip I of France . He was in his own right Count of Vermandois . William of Tyre called him "Hugh Magnus", Hugh the Great, but he was an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Sir Steven Runciman is certain that "Magnus" is a copyist's error, and should be "minus", "the younger" (referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France).

In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris . Although Philip could not participate, as he had been excommunicated , Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11 , 1096.

That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy , where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine Empire , unlike the other Crusader armies who were travelling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians , whose land he had been pillaging. Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy , but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium .
Hugh and most of his army was rescued and escorted to Constantinople , where they arrived in November of 1096. Prior to his arrival, Hugh sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexius I Comnenus , according to the Emperor's biography by his daughter (the Alexiad), demanding that Alexius meet with him:

"Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."

Alexius was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year. Alexius kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098 , captured Antioch , Hugh was sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius. Alexius was uninterested, however, and Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem , went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101 , but was wounded in battle with the Turks in September, and died of his wounds in October in Tarsus .

Family and children
He married Adele of Vermandois, the daughter of Herbert IV of Vermandois and Adele of Valois .They had nine children:
Count Raoul I of Vermandois
Henry, senior of Chaumont-en-Vexin , (d. 1130 ).
Simon, Bishop of Noyon
Elizabeth de Vermandois , married
Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester ;
William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey
Matilde de Vermandois, married Raoul I of Beaugency
Constance de Vermandois, married Godefroy de la Ferte-Gaucher
Agnes de Vermandois, married Margrave Boniface del Vasto . Mother of Adelaide del Vasto .
Beatrix de Vermandois, married Hugh III of Gournay-en-Bray
Emma de Vermandois


Hugh married Adelaide de Vermandois, Countess of Vermandois and Valois,57 daughter of Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois and Valois and Adela, of Valois and Vexin, before 1080. Adelaide was born about 1065 in <Valois, Île-de-France, France> and died on 28 Sep 1120 in <Vermandois> about age 55. Another name for Adelaide was Adele of Vermandois.

Marriage Notes: After 1067 and before 1080?
FamilySearch has m. abt 1064.

Death Notes: Possibly d. 1124

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

[Adele of Vermandois] was the heiress of the county of Vermandois, and descendant of a junior patrilineal line of descent from Charlemagne . The first Count of Vermandois was Pepin of Vermandois . He was a son of Bernard of Italy , grandson of Pippin of Italy and great-grandson of Charlemagne and Hildegard .

As such, Elizabeth had distinguished ancestry and connections. Her father was a younger brother of Philip I of France and her mother was among the last Carolingians . She was also distantly related to the Kings of England , the Dukes of Normandy , the Counts of Flanders and through her Carolingian ancestors to practically every major nobleman in Western Europe .


Children from this marriage were:

+ 45 F    i. Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester 58 was born about 1081 in <Valois, Île-de-France, France>, died on 13 Feb 1131 in England about age 50, and was buried in Lewes, Sussex, England.

+ 46 M    ii. Raoul I, Count of Vermandois .

+ 47 M    iii. Henry, of Chaumont-en-Vexin died in 1130.

+ 48 M    iv. Simon, Bishop of Noyon .

+ 49 F    v. Matilde de Vermandois .

+ 50 F    vi. Constance de Vermandois .

+ 51 F    vii. Agnes de Vermandois .

+ 52 F    viii. Beatrix de Vermandois .

+ 53 F    ix. Emma de Vermandois .

29. Robert I, Count of Flanders 33 (Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born between 1029 and 1035 and died on 13 Oct 1093 in Kassel. Another name for Robert was Robert "the Friesian."

Birth Notes: Wikipedia has b. 1033.

Death Notes: May have died on 3 Oct 1093.

Research Notes: Second son of Baldwin V of Flanders. Second husband of Gertrude of Saxony.

From Wikipedia - Robert I, Count of Flanders :

Robert I of Flanders (1029/1032 - 13 October 1093 in Kassel ), known as Robert the Frisian, was count of Flanders from 1071 to 1092.


History
He was the younger son of Baldwin V of Flanders and Adèle , a daughter of King Robert II of France .

Robert was originally intended to secure the northern borders of Flanders by his marriage to Gertrude of Saxony , Dowager Countess of Holland, but after his brother's death in 1070 he displaced his nephews and became count of Flanders.

Family
By Gertrude of Saxony he had five children:
Robert II
Adela (d. 1115), who first married king Canute IV of Denmark , and was the mother of Charles the Good , later count of Flanders. She then married Roger Borsa , duke of Apulia .
Gertrude, who married 1) Henry III, Count of Louvain and had 4 children.[1] 2) Thierry II, Duke of Lorraine , and was the mother of Thierry of Alsace , also later count of Flanders
Philip of Loo, whose illegitimate son William of Ypres was also a claimant to the county of Flanders
Ogiva, abbess of Messines

Count of Flanders
Robert's nephew Arnulf III (son of Baldwin VI of Flanders ) succeeded his father in 1070 and was supported by his mother Richilde, Countess of Mons and Hainaut . However, Robert challenged Arnulf's succession to the throne of Flanders and began rallying support mainly in northern Flanders (where the bulk of Arnulf's forces were located). Arnulf's ranks contained individuals such as Count Eustace II of Boulogne , Count Eustace III of Boulogne , and Godfrey of Bouillon .

Moreover, Arnulf was supported by King Philip I of France since Philip's aunt, Adela , married Baldwin V of Flanders . A contingent of ten Norman knights led by William FitzOsborn were among the forces sent by Philip to aid Arnulf. Robert's forces attacked Arnulf's numerically superior army at Cassel before it could organize. Arnulf himself was killed along with William FitzOsborn while Richilde was captured by Robert's forces. However, Robert himself was captured by Eustace II. Ultimately, Richilde was exchanged for Robert's freedom.[1] As a result of the battle Robert became count of Flanders.

Robert married Gertrude, of Saxony,59 daughter of Bernard II, Duke in Saxony and Eilika, of Schweinfurt, in 1063. Gertrude was born about 1030 and died on 4 Aug 1113 about age 83. Another name for Gertrude was Gertrude Billung.

Research Notes: Widow of Florent I (Floris I), Count of Holland.

From Wikipedia - Gertrude of Saxony :

Gertrude of Saxony (also known as Gertrude Billung) (c. 1030 - August 4 , 1113 ), was the daughter of Bernard II, Duke of Saxony and Eilika of Schweinfurt . She married Floris I, Count of Holland (c. 1017 - June 28 , 1061 ) c. 1050, and upon his death, her son Dirk V became Count of Holland . Since he was still young, she became regent.

When Dirk V came into power, William I, Bishop of Utrecht , took advantage of the situation, occupying territory that he had claimed in Holland . Gertrude and her son withdrew to the islands of Frisia (Zeeland), leaving William to occupy the disputed lands.

In 1063 Gertrude married Robert of Flanders (Robert the Frisian), the second son of Baldwin V of Flanders . This act gave Dirk the Imperial Flanders as an appanage - including the islands of Frisia west of the Frisian Scheldt . She and her husband then acted as co-regents for the young count.

Family and children
She had a total of seven children with Floris I:
Albrecht (b. ca. 1051), a canon in Liege .
Dirk V (ca. 1052, Vlaardingen -17 June 1091 ).
Pieter (b. ca. 1053), a canon in Liége.
Bertha (ca. 1055-1094, Montreuil-sur-Mer ), who married Philip I of France in 1072.
Floris (b. ca. 1055), a canon in Liége.
Machteld (b. ca. 1057)
Adela (b. ca. 1061), who married Count Baudouin I of Guînes .

From her second marriage to Robert I she had five children:
Robert II of Flanders (c. 1065 - October 5 , 1111 ).
Adela (d.1115), who first married king Canute IV of Denmark , and was the mother of Charles the Good , later count of Flanders. She then married Roger Borsa , duke of Apulia .
Gertrude, who married Thierry II, Duke of Lorraine , and was the mother of Thierry of Alsace , also later count of Flanders.
Philip of Loo, whose illegitimate son William of Ypres was also a claimant to the county of Flanders.
Ogiva, abbess of Messines.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 54 F    i. Gertrude, of Flanders 60 was born about 1070 and died in 1117 about age 47.

30. Matilda, of Flanders 34 (Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1032 in Flanders, died on 2 Nov 1083 in Caen, Normandy, France about age 51, and was buried in Abbaye aux Dames, Caen, Normandy, France. Another name for Matilda was Maud of Flanders.

Birth Notes: Ancestral Roots gives both abt. 1031 and 1032.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots gives 1 Nov 1083 and 2 Nov 1083.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Matilda of Flanders :

Matilda of Flanders (c. 1031 - 2 November 1083) was Queen consort of the Kingdom of England and the wife of William I the Conqueror .

She was the daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders , and Adèle (1000-1078/9), daughter of Robert II of France .

At 4'2" (127 cm) tall, Matilda was England's smallest queen, according to the Guinness Book of Records . According to legend, Matilda (or "Maud") told the representative of William, Duke of Normandy (later king of England as William the Conqueror), who had come asking for her hand, that she was far too high-born (being descended from King Alfred the Great of England) to consider marrying a bastard. When that was repeated to him, William rode from Normandy to Bruges , found Matilda on her way to church, dragged her off her horse by her long braids, threw her down in the street in front of her flabbergasted attendants, and then rode off. Another version of the story states that William rode to Matilda's father's house in Lille, threw her to the ground in her room (again, by the braids), and hit her (or violently shook her) before leaving. Naturally Baldwin took offense at this but, before they drew swords, Matilda settled the matter [1] by deciding to marry him, and even a papal ban (on the grounds of consanguinity ) did not dissuade her. They were married in 1053.

There were rumours that Matilda had been in love with the English ambassador to Flanders , a Saxon named Brihtric, who declined her advances. Whatever the truth of the matter, years later when she was acting as Regent for William in England, she used her authority to confiscate Brihtric's lands and throw him into prison, where he died.

When William was preparing to invade England, Matilda outfitted a ship, the Mora, out of her own money and gave it to him. For many years it was thought that she had some involvement in the creation of the Bayeux Tapestry (commonly called La Tapisserie de la Reine Mathilde in French), but historians no longer believe that; it seems to have been commissioned by William's half-brother Odo, Bishop of Bayeux , and made by English artists in Kent .

Matilda bore William eleven children, and he was believed to have been faithful to her, at least up until the time their son Robert rebelled against his father and Matilda sided with Robert against William. After she died, in 1083 at the age of 51, William became tyrannical, and people blamed it on his having lost her. Contrary to the belief that she was buried at St. Stephen's, also called l'Abbaye-aux-Hommes in Caen , Normandy , where William was eventually buried, she is intombed at l'Abbaye aux Dames , which is the Sainte-Trinité church, also in Caen. Of particular interest is the 11th century slab, a sleek black stone decorated with her epitaph, marking her grave at the rear of the church. It is of special note since the grave marker for William was replaced as recently as the beginning of the 19th century. In 1961, their graves were opened and their bones measured, proving their physical statures. [2]

Children
Some doubt exists over how many daughters there were. This list includes some entries which are obscure.
Robert Curthose (c. 1054 - 1134), Duke of Normandy, married Sybil of Conversano , daughter of Geoffrey of Conversano
Adeliza (or Alice) (c. 1055 - ?), reportedly betrothed to Harold II of England (Her existence is in some doubt.)
Cecilia (or Cecily) (c. 1056 - 1126), Abbess of Holy Trinity, Caen
William Rufus (1056 - 1100), King of the English
Richard, Duke of Bernay (1057 - c. 1081), killed by a stag in New Forest
Adela (c. 1062 - 1138), married Stephen, Count of Blois
Agatha (c. 1064 - c. 1080), betrothed to (1) Harold of Wessex , (2) Alfonso VI of Castile
Constance (c. 1066 - 1090), married Alan IV Fergent , Duke of Brittany ; poisoned, possibly by her own servants
Matilda (very obscure, her existence is in some doubt)
Henry Beauclerc (1068-1135), King of England, married (1) Edith of Scotland , daughter of Malcolm III, King of Scotland , (2) Adeliza of Louvain
NOTE:
Gundred
(c. 1063 - 1085), wife of William de Warenne (c. 1055 - 1088), was formerly thought of as being yet another of Matilda's daughters, with speculation that she was William I's full daughter, a stepdaughter, or even a foundling or adopted daughter. However, this connection to William I has now been firmly debunked--see Gundred's discussion page for further information.
Matilda was a seventh generation direct descendent of Alfred the Great . Her marriage to William strengthened his claim to the throne. All sovereigns of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom have been descended from her, as is the present Queen Elizabeth II .




Matilda married William the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy, King of England,61 son of Robert I, Duke of Normandy and Harlette de Falaise, in 1053 in Cathedral de Notre Dame, Normandie, France. William was born about 1028 in Falaise, Normandy, France and died on 9 Sep 1087 in Rouen, Normandy, France about age 59. Other names for William were William of Normandy and William I King of England.

Birth Notes: Wikipedia (William the Conqueror) and thepeerage.com give b. in 1027 or 1028.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 55 F    i. Adela, of Normandy 62 was born between 1062 and 1067 and died about 8 Mar 1137.

+ 56 M    ii. Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England 63 was born between May 1068 and May 1069 in <Selby, Yorkshire>, England and died on 1 Dec 1135 in St. Denis-le-Fermont, France.

31. Judith, of Normandy 36 (Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1028 and died on 4 Mar 1094 at age 66.

Judith married Tostig, Earl of Northumbria.64 Tostig died on 25 Sep 1066.

Research Notes: First husband of Judith of Normandy.

Judith next married Welf IV, Duke of Bavaria 65 in 1071. Welf died on 6 Nov 1101.

Research Notes: Second husband of Judith of Normandy.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 57 M    i. Henry I, Duke of Bavaria 66 was born in 1074 and died on 13 Dec 1126 at age 52.

32. Henry, of Burgundy 38 (Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1035 in <Bourgogne, Champagne>, France and died about 1071 about age 36. Another name for Henry was Henri Comte de Bourgogne.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots has d. 27 Jan. 1066/7 and d. 27 Jan.1066/1074. Wikipedia has d. abt. 1071.

Research Notes: His wife was NOT named Sibylle of Barcelona, daughter of Berenger Ramon I, according to Wikipedia.

From Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy :

Henry of Burgundy (1035 - c. 1071 ) was the son and heir of Robert I , duke of Burgundy . He died shortly before his father and failed to succeed in Burgundy. The name of his wife is unknown (that it was Sibil has been discredited) as is her origin, although a connection to the Counts of Barcelona has been hypothesized. Their children were:
Hugh I, Duke of Burgundy (1057-1093)
Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy (1058-1103)
Robert, bishop of Langres (1059-1111)
Helie, a nun (b. 1061)
Beatrice (b. 1063), married Guy I, count of Vignory
Reginald, abbot of St Pierre (1065-1092)
Henry, Count of Portugal (1066-1112), who became a vassal of León and ruler of the county of Portugal in 1093; his son would be Afonso Henriques , first king of Portugal

Noted events in his life were:

• "Le damoiseau de Bourgogne":

Henry married < >, [Not Sibylle of Barcelona].

Children from this marriage were:

+ 58 M    i. Hugh I, Duke of Burgundy was born in 1057 and died in 1093 at age 36.

+ 59 M    ii. Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy 67 was born about 1058 and died on 23 Mar 1103 in Cilicia about age 45.

+ 60 M    iii. Robert, Bishop of Langres was born in 1059 and died in 1111 at age 52.

+ 61 F    iv. Beatrice, of Burgundy 68 was born about 1063 and died after 1110.

+ 62 M    v. Reginald, Abbot of St. Pierre was born in 1065 and died in 1092 at age 27.

+ 63 M    vi. Henry, of Burgundy, Count of Portugal 69 was born in 1069 in <Bourgogne, Champagne>, France and died on 1 Nov 1112 at age 43.

+ 64 F    vii. Helie .

33. Constance, of Burgundy 39 (Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1046 and died in 1092 at age 46.

Death Notes: Wikipedia has d. 1093

Research Notes: Second wife of Alfonso VI.

From Wikipedia - Constance of Burgundy :

Constance of Burgundy (1046 - 1093), was the daughter of Duke Robert I of Burgundy and Helie de Semur-en-Brionnais .
She built a monastery in Burgos for Adelelmus in 1079. She married Alfonso VI of Castile on May 8 , 1079 . They had two children:
Urraca of Castile (1079 - March 8 , 1126 ).
Elvira of Castile. Considered to have died young.

Constance married Alfonso VI "the Brave", of Castile, King of Castile and Leon,70 son of Ferdinand I, King of Castile and Léon and Sancha, Princess of Léon, in 1081. Alfonso was born before Jun 1040 in <Burgos, Castile>, Spain and died on 29 Jun 1109 in Toledo, Castile, Spain. Another name for Alfonso was Alfonso I of Castile.

Birth Notes: Ancestral Roots has b. 1039

Research Notes: Second husband of Constance of Burgundy.

From Wikipedia - Alfonso VI of León and Castile :

Alfonso VI (before June 1040 - June 29 /July 1 , 1109 ), nicknamed the Brave (El Bravo) or the Valiant, was King of León from 1065 to 1109 and King of Castile from 1072 following the death of his brother Sancho II . In 1077 he proclaimed himself "Emperor of all Spain ". Much romance has gathered around his name.

Early life
As the second and favorite son of King Ferdinand I of León and Princess Sancha of León , Alfonso was allotted León, while Castile was given to his eldest brother Sancho , and Galicia to his youngest brother García . Sancho was assassinated in 1072. García was dethroned and imprisoned for life the following year.

In the cantar de gesta The Lay of the Cid , he plays the part attributed by medieval poets to the greatest kings, and to Charlemagne himself. He is alternately the oppressor and the victim of heroic and self-willed nobles - the idealized types of the patrons for whom the jongleurs and troubadours sang. He is the hero of a cantar de gesta which, like all but a very few of the early Spanish songs, like the cantar of Bernardo del Carpio and the Infantes of Lara , exists now only in the fragments incorporated in the chronicle of Alfonso the Wise or in ballad form.

His flight from the monastery of Sahagún (Safagún in Leonese language ), where his brother Sancho endeavoured to imprison him, his chivalrous friendship for his host Almamun of Toledo , caballero aunque moro, "a knight although a Moor ", the passionate loyalty of his vassal, Pero (Pedro) Ansúrez, and his brotherly love for his sister Urraca of Zamora , may owe something to the poet who took him as a hero.

They are the answer to the poet of the nobles who represented the king as having submitted to taking a degrading oath at the hands of Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (El Cid ) to deny intervention in his brother's death in the church of Santa Gadea at Burgos , and as having then persecuted the brave man who defied him.

Marriages and children
Alfonso married at least five times and had two mistresses and a fiancée:

In 1067, two brothers from Iberia are said to have competed for the hand of Agatha , one of the daughters of William I of England and Matilda of Flanders and formerly fiancee of Harold Godwinson . Alfonso proved successful, and was betrothed to Agatha. A nun at the time, Agatha is said to have prayed for death rather than being forced to marry Alphonso, and she died before the marriage could take place.

In 1069, Alfonso married Agnes of Aquitaine , daughter of William VIII of Aquitaine and his second wife Mateoda. They last appear together in May 1077, and then Alfonso appears alone. This suggests that she had died, although Orderic Vitalis reports that in 1109 Alfonso's 'relict' Agnes remarried to Elias I of Maine , leading some to speculate that Alfonso and Agnes had divorced due to consanguinity . It seems more likely that Orderic gave the wrong name to Alfonso's widow, Beatrice. Agnes and Alfonso had no children.

Apparently between his first and second marriages he formed a liaison with Jimena Muñoz , a "most noble" (nobilissima) concubine "derived from royalty" (real generacion). She appears to have been put aside, given land in Ulver, at the time of Alfonso's remarriage. By her Alfonso had two illegitimate daughters, Elvira and Teresa .

His second wife, who he married by May 1080, was Constance of Burgundy , daughter of Robert I, Duke of Burgundy . This marriage initially faced papal opposition, apparently due to her kinship with Agnes. Her reign as queen brought significant Cluniac influences into the kingdom. She died in September or October, 1093, the mother of Alfonso's eldest legitimate daughter Urraca , and of five other children who died in infancy.

Either late in Constance's reign or shortly after her death, Alfonso formed a liaison with a second mistress, Zaida of Seville , said by Iberian Muslim sources to be daughter-in-law of Al Mutamid , the Muslim King of Seville. She fled the fall of Seville for Alfonso's kingdom in 1091, and soon became his lover, having by him Alfonso's only son, Sancho , who, though illegitimate was apparently not born of an adulterous relationship, and hence born after the death of Constance. He would be named his father's heir. Several modern sources have suggested that Zaida, baptised under the name of Isabel, is identical with Alfonso's later wife, queen Isabel (or that she was a second queen Isabel who he married in succession to the first). Zaida/Isabel died in childbirth, but the date is unknown, and it is unclear whether the child being delivered was Sancho, an additional illegitimate child, otherwise unknown, or legitimate daughter Elvira (if Zaida was identical to Queen Isabel).

By April 1095, Alfonso married Bertha. Chroniclers report her as being from Tuscany , Lombardy , or alternatively, say she was French. Several theories have been put forward regarding her origin. Based on political considerations, proposals make her daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy or of Amadeus II of Savoy . She had no children and died in late 1099 (Alfonso first appears without her in mid-January 1100).

Within months, by May 1100, Alfonso again remarried, to Isabel, having by her two daughters, Sancha, (wife of Rodrigo González de Lara ), and Elvira , (who married Roger II of Sicily ). A non-contemporary tomb inscription says she was daughter of a "king Louis of France ", but this is chronologically impossible. It has been speculated that she was of Burgundian origin, but others conclude that Alfonso married his former mistress, Zaida, who had been baptized as Isabel. (In a novel twist, Reilly suggested that there were two successive queens named Isabel: first the French (Burgundian) Isabel, mother of Sancha and Elvira, with Alfonso only later marrying his mistress Zaida (Isabel), after the death of or divorce from the first Isabel.) Alfonso was again widowed in mid-1107.

By May 1108, Alfonso married his last wife, Beatrice . She, as widow of Alfonso, is said to have returned home to France, but nothing else is known of her origin unless she is the woman Orderic named as "Agnes, daughter of William, Duke of Poitou", who as relict of Alfonso, (Agnetem, filiam Guillelmi, Pictavorum ducis, relictam Hildefonsi senioris, Galliciae regis), remarried to Elias of Maine. If this is the case, she is likely daughter of William IX of Aquitaine and niece of Alfonso's first wife. Beatrice had no children by Alfonso.

Alfonso's designated successor, his son Sancho, was slain after being routed at the Battle of Uclés in 1108, making Alfonso's eldest legitimate daughter, the widowed Urraca as his heir. In order to strengthen her position as his successor, Alfonso began negotiations for her to marry her second cousin, Alfonso I of Aragon and Navarre , but died before the marriage could take place, Urraca succeeding.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 65 F    i. Urraca, of Castile, Queen of Castile and Léon 71 was born about 1082 in <Burgos, Castile>, Spain and died on 8 Mar 1126 in Saldana, Palencia, Spain about age 44.

34. Hugues de Dammartin, Count of Dammartin 42 (Constance Capet18, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1042 in <Dammartin-en-Goele, Seine-et-Marne>, France and died in 1103 about age 61.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Dammartin-en-Goële :

History
Dammartin is historically important as the seat of a county of which the holders played a considerable part in French history . The earliest recorded count of Dammartin was a certain Hugh, who made himself master of the town in the 10th century; but his dynasty was replaced by another family in the 11th century. Reynald I (Renaud ), count of Dammartin (d. 1227), who was one of the coalition crushed by King Philip Augustus at the battle of Bouvines (1214), left two co-heiresses, of whom the elder, Maud (Matilda or Mahaut), married Philip Hurepel , son of Philip Augustus, and the second, Alix, married Jean de Trie , in whose line the county was reunited after the death of Philip Hurepel's son Alberic. The county passed, through heiresses, to the houses of Fayel and Nanteuil , and in the 15th century was acquired by Antoine de Chabannes (d. 1488), one of the favorites of King Charles VII , by his marriage with Marguerite, heiress of Reynald V of Nanteuil-Aci and Marie of Dammartin. This Antoine de Chabannes, count of Dammartin in right of his wife, fought under the standard of Joan of Arc , became a leader of the Ecorcheurs , took part in the war of the public weal against Louis XI , and then fought for him against the Burgundians . The collegiate church at Dammartin was founded by him in 1480, and his tomb and effigy are in the chancel.

His son, Jean de Chabannes , left three heiresses, of whom the second left a daughter who brought the county to Philippe de Boulainvilliers , by whose heirs it was sold in 1554 to the dukes of Montmorency . In 1632 the county was confiscated by Louis XIII and bestowed on the princes of Conde .

Hugues married Roaide, Countess of Bulles.41 Roaide was born about 1046 in Bulles, Oise, France.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 66 F    i. Aelis de Dammartin 72 was born about 1084 in Dammartin-en-Goele, Seine-et-Marne, France.

35. Geoffrey, de Bretagne 44 (Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1001 in Bretagne, France.

Geoffrey married Hedwige, de Normandie.73 Hedwige was born about 1004 in Normandy, France.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 67 F    i. Emme, de Bretagne 74 was born about 1026 in Bretagne, France.

36. Eudes, Comté de Bretagne 45 (Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1008 in Rennes, Bretagne, Indre-et-Loire, (France) and died on 7 Jan 1079 about age 71. Another name for Eudes was Eudes Count of Brittany.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/4744.htm :
"After the death of Alain in 1040 Eudes siezed the government of Brittany to the exclusion of his nephew, Conan [i.e. Conan II, Duke of Brittany, dsp. 1066], who recovered it in 1057."
~An Analysis of the Domesday Book of the County of Norfolk, "Predigree of Eudo Count of Britanny," pg. 12 782

~Weis' Ancestral Roots . . ., 214:22, comté de Bretagne, comté de Penthièvre, 1034, m. Orguen, living in 1056
160

Eudes married someone.

His child was:

+ 68 M    i. Bardolph, Lord of Ravenswath 75 was born in Bretagne, (France) and died after 1100 in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

37. Richard III, Duke of Normandy 35 (Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 997 and died on 6 Aug 1028 about age 31.

Death Notes: Died in 1027 or 1028.

Research Notes: Eldest son. First husband of Adele of France.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132A-23

From Wikipedia - Richard III, Duke of Normandy :

Richard III (997 - 1027) was the eldest son of Richard II , who died in 1027. Before succeeding his father, perhaps about 1020, he had been sent by his father in command of a large army, to attack bishop/count Hugh of Chalon in order to rescue his brother-in-law, Reginald , later Count of Burgundy , who the count/bishop had captured and imprisoned. He was betrothed to Adela, countess of Corbie (1009-June 5, 1063), second daughter of Robert II of France and Constance of Arles , but they never married.

After his father's death, he ruled the Duchy of Normandy only briefly, dying mysteriously, perhaps by poison, soon after his father. The duchy passed to his younger brother Robert I . Adela later married Baldwin V, Count of Flanders .

By unknown women, he had two known children:
Alice/Alix of Normandy who married Ranulf, Viscount of Bayeux.
Nicolas, the Lay Abbot of Rouen (b? - d. 27 Feb 1092). He helped his cousin, Duke William II the Conqueror with the contribution of 15 ships and 100 soldiers for the invasion of England in 1066.

Noted events in his life were:

• Duke of Normandy: 1026-1028.

Richard had a relationship with < >, [Unknown mistress].76 This couple did not marry.

Their child was:

+ 69 F    i. Alice, of Normandy 77 was born about 1021 in <Normandy, France>.

Richard married Adele Capet, Princess of France,17 daughter of Robert II "the Pious", King of France and Constance, of Provence, on 10 Jan 1027. Adele was born about 1009 and died about 8 Jan 1079 in Messines Monastery, Messines (Mesen), West Flanders, (Belgium) about age 70. Other names for Adele were Adèle of France, Countess of Contentin, Adele "the Holy" of Messines, Aelis of France, and Countess of Contentin.

Research Notes: Second daughter of Robert the Pious and Constance of Arles.

From Wikipedia - Adela of France, Countess of Flanders :

Adela Capet, Adèle of France or Adela of Flanders[1], known also as Adela the Holy or Adela of Messines; (1009 - 8 January 1079 , Messines ) was the second daughter of Robert II (the Pious), and Constance of Arles . As dowry to her future husband, she received from her father the title of Countess of Corbie.

Her family
She was a member of the House of Capet , the rulers of France. As the wife of Baldwin V , she was Countess of Flanders from 1036 to 1067.

She married first 1027 Richard III Duke of Normandy (997 † 1027). They never had children.

As a widow, she remarried in 1028 in Paris to Baldwin V of Flanders (1012 † 1067). Their children were:
Baldwin VI of Flanders , (1030 † 1070)
Matilda of Flanders (1032 † 1083). In 1053 she married William Duke of Normandy , the future king of England
Robert I of Flanders , (1033-1093)
Henry of Flanders (c. 1035)
Sir Richard of Flanders (c. 1050-1105)

Political influence
Adèle's influence lay mainly in her family connections. On the death of her brother, Henry I of France, the guardianship of his seven-year-old son Philip I fell jointly on his widow, Ann of Kiev , and on his brother-in-law, Adela's husband, so that from 1060 to 1067, they were Regents of France.

Church influence
Adèle had an especially great interest in Baldwin V's church-reform politics and was behind her husband's founding of several collegiate churches . Directly or indirectly, she was responsible for establishing the Colleges of Aire (1049), Lille (1050) and Harelbeke (1064) as well as the abbeys of Messines (1057) and Ename (1063). After Baldwin's death in 1067, she went to Rome, took the nun's veil from the hands of Pope Alexander II and retreated to the Benedictine convent of Messines, near Ypres . There she died, being buried at the same monastery. Her commemoration day is 8 September.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 15)

38. Adelais, de Normandie 47 (Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1007 in <Normandy, France> and died about 1037 in France about age 30. Another name for Adelais was Judith of Normandy.

Adelais married Renaud I, Count Palantine of Burgundy,47 son of Otto Guillaume, Count of Burgundy and Ermentrude, Countess of Rheims, before 1023 in France. Renaud was born about 986 in <Bourgogne, Champagne>, France and died on 4 Sep 1057 in France about age 71. Another name for Renaud was Renaud I de Bourgogne.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 70 M    i. Guillaume I de Bourgogne 78 was born about 1040 in <Bourgogne, Champagne>, France and died on 12 Nov 1087 in France about age 47.

39. Robert I, Duke of Normandy 48 (Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1008 in Normandy, France and died on 22 Jul 1035 in Nicaea, Bythnia, (Turkey) about age 27. Other names for Robert were Robert (I, II, the Devil, Magnificent) de Normandie and Robert I 6th Duc de Normandie.

Birth Notes: Citing Alison Weir's Britains's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy, thepeerage.com has born c. 1008.

Death Notes: May have died on 2 July 1035.

Research Notes: Father of William the Conqueror and Adelaide (Adela) of Normandy.

From Wikipedia - Robert I, Duke of Normandy :

Robert the Magnificent[1] (June 22 , 1000 - 3 July 1035 ), also called Robert the Devil and Robert I or II, was the Duke of Normandy from 1027 until his death. He was the son of Richard II of Normandy and Judith , daughter of Conan I of Rennes . He was the father of William the Conqueror .

Life
When his father died, his elder brother Richard succeeded, whilst he became Count of Hiémois . When Richard died a year later, there were great suspicions that Robert had Richard murdered, hence his other nickname, "Robert le diable" ("the devil"). He is sometimes identified with the legendary Robert the Devil .

Robert aided King Henry I of France against Henry's rebellious brother and mother, and for his help he was given the territory of the Vexin . He also intervened in the affairs of Flanders , supported Edward the Confessor , who was then in exile at Robert's court, and sponsored monastic reform in Normandy .

By his mistress, Herleva of Falaise, he was father of the future William I of England (1028-1087). He also had an illegitimate daughter, but the only chronicler to explicitly address the issue, Robert of Torigny , contradicts himself, once indicating that she had a distinct mother from William, elsewhere stating that they shared the same mother. This daughter, Adelaide of Normandy (1030-c. 1083), married three times: to Enguerrand II, Count of Ponthieu , Lambert II, Count of Lens , and Odo II of Champagne .

After making his illegitimate son William his heir, he set out on pilgrimage to Jerusalem . According to the Gesta Normannorum Ducum he travelled by way of Constantinople , reached Jerusalem, and died on the return journey at Nicaea on 2 July 1035 . Some sources attribute his death to poison and date it to 1 or 3 July. His son William, aged about eight, succeeded him.

According to the historian William of Malmesbury , around 1086 William sent a mission to Constantinople and Nicaea, charging it with bringing his father's body back to be buried in Normandy. Permission was granted, but, having travelled as far as Apulia (Italy) on the return journey, the envoys learned that William himself had meanwhile died. They then decided to re-inter Robert's body in Italy.


Noted events in his life were:

• Duke of Normandy: 1027-1035.

• Count of Hiémois: 1026.

• Succeeded: to the title of 6th Duc de Normandie, 8 Aug 1028.

Robert had a relationship with Harlette de Falaise,79 daughter of Fulbert de Falaise and Doda, de Falaise,. This couple did not marry. Harlette was born about 1003 in Falaise, Calvados, Normandy, France, died before 1050, and was buried in Abbey of St. Grestain, France. Other names for Harlette were Arlotte de Falaise, Arletta de Falaise, Arlette de Falaise, Herleva de Falaise, and Herlève de Falaise.

Birth Notes: Citing the Royal Genealogies Website, thepeerage.com has b. abt 1012. Wikipedia (Herleva) has abt 1003.

Burial Notes: From Wikipedia (Herleva):
According to Robert of Torigni , Herleva was buried at the abbey of Grestain, which was founded by Herluin and their son Robert around 1050. This would put Herleva in her forties around the time of her death. However, David C. Douglas suggests that Herleva probably died before Herluin founded the abbey because her name does not appear on the list of benefactors, whereas the name of Herluin's second wife, Fredesendis, does.

Research Notes: Mother of William I of England (William the Conqueror).

Source http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593882938 has b. 1003 in Falaise, Cavados, France. From that source:
Her son William I, King of England was illegitimate. aka (Herleve)

1 NAME Harlette /De Falaise/ 1 NAME Herleve (Arlette) /de Falaise/ 2SOUR S033320 3 DATA 4 TEXT Date of Import: Jan 17, 2001 1 BIRT 2 DATEABT. 1003 2 PLAC Falaise, Normandie 1 BIRT 2 DATE ABT. 1003 2 PLAC ofFalais, Calvados, France 2 SOUR S033320 3 DATA 4 TEXT Date of Import:Jan 17, 2001

[De La Pole.FTW]

Sources: A. Roots 121E, 130; RC 89, 160; Coe; Kraentzler 1156, 1163,1179, 1241, 1264, 1265, 1309, 1342, 1350, 1383; AIS; Davis; Ayers, p648.
Roots: Arlette (or Herleve/Herleva).
Coe: Arlette. AIS: Narlette of Falaise.
K: Harlette de Falaise.
Davis: Herleve, daughter of Fulbert, a tanner of Falaise.


Father: Fulbert THORGILSSON b: Abt 0986 in Falaise,Calvados,France
Mother: Doda UNKNOWN b: Abt 0988 in ,France

Marriage 1 Herluin DE CONTEVILLE b: Abt 1001 in Conteville,Seine Maritime,France
Note:
_UIDE180A329BD15BA45BDEC96201555521E3798
2 _PREF Y
Children
Odo UNKNOWN b: Abt 1030 in Conteville,Seine Maritime,France
Emma DE CONTEVILLE b: Abt 1033 in ,France
Robert DE CONTEVILLE b: 1037 in of Conteville, Seine Maritime, France
Muriel DE CONTEVILLE b: 1042 in Of Conteville,Normandy,France

Marriage 2 Robert I UNKNOWN b: Abt 1003 in ,Normandy,France
Married: Abt 1023 in not married 3
Note:
_UID2FB1974BB9DEBD4BBFE274FEEECDAECEABB8
2 _PREF Y
Children
William I UNKNOWN b: 14 Oct 1027 in Falaise Castle,Normandy,France
Adelaide UNKNOWN b: 1030 in Falais,Calvados,France
Ralph UNKNOWN b: Abt 1033 in ,, France

Sources:

Title: GEDCOM File : 2134392.ged
Date: 12 Jul 2002
Author: Mark Willis Ballard
Title: GEDCOM File : mwballard.ged
Note:
6928 N. Lakewood Avenue
773-743-6663
mwballard52@yahoo.com
Date: 4 Nov 2003
Title: De La Pole.FTW
Note:
Source Media Type: Other
Repository:
Name: Not Given


Their children were:

+ 71 M    i. William the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy, King of England 61 was born about 1028 in Falaise, Normandy, France and died on 9 Sep 1087 in Rouen, Normandy, France about age 59.

+ 72 F    ii. Adelaide, of Normandy, Countess of Aumale 80 was born about 1030 and died between 1081 and 1090.

40. Fulk IV "le Réchin", Count of Anjou 50 (Ermengarde, of Anjou21, Fulk III "the Black", of Maine, Count of Anjou9, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1043 in Anjou, France and died on 14 Apr 1109 at age 66.

Research Notes: From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871918 :

Count of Anjou and chronicler. Having inhereted the right to Touraine and Chateau-Landon, half of the Angevin inheritance, from his uncle, Geoffrey Martel I, Fulk went to war against his brother Geoffrey, captured and imprisoned him in 1066 and took Anjou and Saintonge, Geoffrey's half of the inheritance, into his domains. The Chronicle of the Counts of Anjou tells that his wife eloped with Philip I of France (RIN # 1332) in 1107. Fulk himself was the initiator of this work in the 1090's, chronicling his forbearers. (This reference is not to his first wife Hildegard, RIN #1763)
!The Plantagenet Chronicles: 20,30,33-7

---
From Wikipedia - Fulk IV, Count of Anjou :

Fulk IV (1043-1109), called le Réchin, was the Count of Anjou from 1068 until his death. The nickname by which he is usually referred has no certain translation. Philologists have made numerous very different suggestions, including "quarreler", "sullen", and "heroic".

Biography
He was the younger son of Geoffrey, Count of Gâtinais (sometimes known as Aubri), and Ermengarde of Anjou , a daughter of Fulk the Black , count of Anjou, and sister of Geoffrey Martel , also count of Anjou.

When Geoffrey Martel died without direct heirs he left Anjou to his nephew Geoffrey III of Anjou , Fulk le Réchin's older brother.

Fulk fought with his brother, whose rule was deemed incompetent, and captured him in 1067. Under pressure from the Church he released Geoffrey. The two brothers soon fell to fighting again, and the next year Geoffrey was again imprisoned by Fulk, this time for good.

Substantial territory was lost to Angevin control due to the difficulties resulting from Geoffrey's poor rule and the subsequent civil war. Saintonge was lost, and Fulk had to give the Gâtinais to Philip I of France to placate the king.

Much of Fulk's rule was devoted to regaining control over the Angevin baronage, and to a complex struggle with Normandy for influence in Maine and Brittany .

In 1096 Fulk wrote an incomplete history of Anjou and its rulers titled Fragmentum historiae Andegavensis or "History of Anjou", though the authorship and authenticity of this work is disputed. Only the first part of the history, describing Fulk's ancestry, is extant. The second part, supposedly describing Fulk's own rule, has not been recovered. If he did write it, it is one of the first medieval works of history written by a layman.[1]

Fulk may have married as many as five times; there is some doubt regarding two of the marriages.
His first wife was Hildegarde of Baugency . After her death, before 1070, he married Ermengarde de Borbon , and then possibly Orengarde de Châtellailon . Both these were repudiated (Ermengarde de Borbon in 1075 and Orengarde de Chatellailon in 1080), possibly on grounds of consanguinity.

By 1080 he may have married Mantie , daughter of Walter I of Brienne . This marriage also ended in divorce, in 1087. Finally, he married Bertrade de Montfort , who was apparently "abducted" by King Philip I of France in 1092.

He had two sons. The eldest (a son of Ermengarde de Borbon), Geoffrey IV Martel , ruled jointly with him for some time, but died in 1106. The younger (a son of Bertrade de Montfort) succeeded him as Fulk V .

He also had a daughter by Hildegarde of Baugency, Ermengarde , who married firstly with William IX , count of Poitou and duke of Aquitaine and secondly with Alan IV, Duke of Brittany .

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Anjou: 1068-1109.

Fulk married Bertrade, de Montfort,81 daughter of Simon I de Montfort and Agnes d'Évreux, in 1089. Bertrade was born about 1070 and died on 14 Feb 1117 in <Fontevraud Abbey> about age 47. Another name for Bertrade was Beatrice de Montfort.

Research Notes: 5th wife of Fulk IV. "Abducted" by King Philip I of France in 1092.

From Wikipedia - Bertrade de Montfort :

Bertrade de Montfort (c. 1070-14 February 1117) was the daughter of Simon I de Montfort and Agnes, Countess of Evreux . Her brother was Amauri de Montfort .


Marriages
The oft-married Fulk IV, Count of Anjou was married to the mother of his son in 1089, when the lovely Bertrade caught his eye. According to the chronicler John of Marmoutier :
The lecherous Fulk then fell passionately in love with the sister of Amaury of Montfort, whom no good man ever praised save for her beauty. For her sake, he divorced the mother of Geoffrey II Martel…

Bertrade and Fulk were married, and they became the parents of a son, Fulk , but in 1092 Bertrade left her husband and took up with King Philip I of France . Philip married her on 15 May 1092, despite the fact that they both had spouses living. He was so enamoured of Bertrade that he refused to leave her even when threatened with excommunication . Pope Urban II did excommunicate him in 1095, and Philip was prevented from taking part in the First Crusade . Astonishingly, Bertrade persuaded Philip and Fulk to be friends.

Children
With Fulk IV, Count of Anjou :
Fulk of Jerusalem , Count of Anjou and King of Jerusalem (1089/92 - 1143)

With Philip I of France :
Philippe de France, Count of Mantes (living in 1123)
Fleury de France, seigneur of Nangis (living in 1118)
Cecile of France (died 1145), married (1) Tancred, Prince of Galilee ; married (2) Pons of Tripoli

Later life
According to Orderic Vitalis , Bertrade was anxious that one of her sons succeed Philip, and sent a letter to King Henry I of England asking him to arrest her stepson Louis . Orderic also claims she sought to kill Louis first through the arts of sorcery, and then through poison. Whatever the truth of these allegations, Louis succeeded Philip in 1108. Bertrade lived on until 1117; William of Malmesbury says: "Bertrade, still young and beautiful, took the veil at Fontevraud Abbey , always charming to men, pleasing to God, and like an angel." Her son from her first marriage was Fulk V of Anjou who later became King of Jerusalem iure uxoris . The dynasties founded by Fulk's sons ruled for centuries, one of them in England (Plantagenet ), the other in Jerusalem .


The child from this marriage was:

+ 73 M    i. Fulk V "the Young", Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem 82 was born in 1092 in Angers, France and died on 10 Nov 1144 in Acre, Palestine at age 52.

Fulk next married Hildegarde, of Baugency.83 Hildegarde died before 1070.

41. Foulques "Taillefer", Comté d'Angoulême 52 (Geoffroy d'Angoulême22, Gerberge, d'Anjou10, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in 1087.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/4539.htm :
Web Reference: Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands, Foulques d'Angoulême .
Foulques d'Angoulême married Condoha d'Eu, daughter of Robert Saint-Amant-de-Boixe and his first wife Beatrix. The death of Foulques "Taillerfer" comté d'Angoulême is recorded in the Historia Pontificum et Comitum Engolismensium records to have taken place in 1087.

Foulques married Condoha d'Eu,84 daughter of Robert d'Eu and Béatrix,. Another name for Condoha was Condoha d'Eu.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 74 M    i. William III, Count of Angoulême 85 was born about 1084, died in 1120 in Deutz about age 36, and was buried in 1120 in Deutz St. Heribert.

42. Adeline, of Meulan 54 (Waleran I, Count of Meulan23, Alix de Vexin11, Gauthier II Vexin, Count of Vexin6, Adèle, d'Anjou3, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1014 in <Pont-Audemer>, Normandy, France and died in 1081 about age 67. Another name for Adeline was Adeliza Meulent.

Adeline married Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer,54 son of Humphrey, de Vielles, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Albreda de la Haye Auberie, about 1048. Roger was born about 1015 in <Pont Audemer>, Normandy, France, died on 29 Nov 1094 about age 79, and was buried in Preaux Abbey, Preaux, Normandy, France. Other names for Roger were Roger "le Barbu" de Beaumont Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger, Roger Barbatus de Beaumont Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer, and Roger de Beaumont-le-Roger.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Roger de Beaumont :

Roger de Beaumont-le-Roger (c. 1015 - 29 November 1094 ) was son of Humphrey de Vielles (himself a great-nephew of the Duchess Gunnora of Normandy ) and his wife Albreda de la Haye Auberie. Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer, Viscount of Hiesmes, was thus a second cousin once removed of the Conqueror .

Life
Roger was nicknamed Barbatus or La Barbe because he wore a moustache and beard while the Normans usually were clean shaven. This peculiarity is recognized in the thirty-second panel of the Bayeux Tapestry where he is depicted sitting at a feast with Duke William on his left hand, Odo , brother of William and Bishop of Bayeux , in the centre.

Planché tells us that "he was the noblest, the wealthiest, and the most valiant seigneur of Normandy, and the greatest and most trusted friend of the Danish family." There is an explanation for this - as an older cousin who had never rebelled against the young Duke, he was part of the kinship group of noblemen that William relied upon in governing Normandy and fighting off frequent rebellion and invasions. The historian Frank McLynn notes that William relied on relatives descended via his mother (namely his half-brothers and brothers-in-law) and on relatives descended from the Duchess Gunnora's sisters, since his own paternal kin had proved unreliable.

Wace , the 12th century historian, says that "at the time of the invasion of England, Roger was summoned to the great council at Lillebonne , on account of his wisdom; but that he did not join in the expedition as he was too far advanced in years." Although Roger could not fight, he did not hesitate in contributing his share of the cost, for he provided at his own expense sixty vessels for the conveyance of the troops across the channel. Furthermore, his eldest son and heir fought bravely at Hastings as noted in several contemporary records. As a result, Roger's elder sons were awarded rich lands in England, and both eventually were made English earls by the sons of the Conqueror.

Family and children
He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081 . Their surviving children were:
Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester , Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings .
Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick , overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle.
William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).
Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton


Children from this marriage were:

+ 75 M    i. Sir Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester and Count of Meulan 86 was born about 1049 in Pont-Audemer, Beaumont, Normandy, France, died on 5 Jun 1118 in Leicestershire, England about age 69, and was buried in Preaux, Normandy, France.

+ 76 M    ii. Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick 87 was born about 1046, died on 20 Jun 1123 about age 77, and was buried in Preaux Abbey, Preaux, Normandy, France.

+ 77 M    iii. William de Beaumont .

+ 78 F    iv. Alberee de Beaumont, Abess of Eton .

43. Hugh, Count of Meulan (Waleran I, Count of Meulan23, Alix de Vexin11, Gauthier II Vexin, Count of Vexin6, Adèle, d'Anjou3, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Counts of Meulan


previous  Seventh Generation  Next



44. Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre 56 (William I, Count of Nevers24, Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1047 in <Nevers, Nievre>, France and died on 5 Aug 1089 about age 42. Another name for Renaud was Renaud Comte de Nevers.

Renaud married Ida, de Forez,88 daughter of Artald III, Count of Lyon and Forez and Unknown,. Ida was born about 1051 in <Le Forez, Provence>, France and died in 1085 about age 34. Another name for Ida was Hawide de Forez.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 79 F    i. Ermengarde, de Nevers 89 was born about 1073 in <Courtenay, Loiret>, France and died in 1095 in France about age 22.

45. Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester 58 (Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1081 in <Valois, Île-de-France, France>, died on 13 Feb 1131 in England about age 50, and was buried in Lewes, Sussex, England. Other names for Isabel were Elizabeth de Vermandois, Isabella de Vermandois, and Isabel de Vermandois.

Birth Notes: FamilySearch has b. abt 1085 in Valois, France

Research Notes: From: Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

Elizabeth de Vermandois, or Elisabeth or Isabel de Vermandois (c. 1081 -13 February 1131 ), is a fascinating figure about whose descendants and ancestry much is known and about whose character and life relatively little is known. She was twice married to influential Anglo-Norman magnates, and had several children (among whose descendants are numbered many kings and some queens of England and Scotland). Her Capetian and Carolingian ancestry was a source of much pride for some of these descendants (who included these arms as quarterings in their coats-of-arms[1] ). However, the lady herself led a somewhat controversial life.

Family
Elizabeth de Vermandois was the third daughter of Hugh Magnus and Adele of Vermandois. Her paternal grandparents were Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev . Her maternal grandparents were Herbert IV of Vermandois and Adele of Vexin .
Her mother was the heiress of the county of Vermandois, and descendant of a junior patrilineal line of descent from Charlemagne . The first Count of Vermandois was Pepin of Vermandois . He was a son of Bernard of Italy , grandson of Pippin of Italy and great-grandson of Charlemagne and Hildegard .

As such, Elizabeth had distinguished ancestry and connections. Her father was a younger brother of Philip I of France and her mother was among the last Carolingians . She was also distantly related to the Kings of England , the Dukes of Normandy , the Counts of Flanders and through her Carolingian ancestors to practically every major nobleman in Western Europe .

Countess of Leicester
In 1096, while under age (and probably aged 9 or 11), Elizabeth married Robert de Meulan, 1st Earl of Leicester . Meulan was over 35 years her senior, which was an unusual age difference even for this time period. He was a nobleman of some significance in France, having inherited lands from his maternal uncle Henry, Count of Meulan, and had fought bravely and with distinction at his first battle, the Battle of Hastings in 1066 then aged only 16. His parents Roger de Beaumont , Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemar and Adeline of Meulan , heiress of Meulan had died long before; Roger had been a kinsman and close associate of William the Conqueror . Meulan had inherited lands in Normandy after his father died circa 1089, and had also been given lands in the Kingdom of England after his participation in the Norman conquest of England . However, at the time of the marriage, he held no earldom in England while his younger brother was already styled Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick .

Planche states that the bride (Elizabeth) agreed willingly to the marriage, although this means little in the context. Despite the immense age difference, this was a good marriage for its times. Meulan was a respected advisor to three reigning monarchs: William II of England ), Robert Curthose of Normandy and Philip I of France .

According to Middle Ages custom, brides were often betrothed young - 8 being the legal age for betrothal and 12 for marriage (for women). The young betrothed wife would often go to her husband's castle to be raised by his parents or other relatives and to learn the customs and ways of her husband's family. The actual wedding would not take place until much later. Some genealogists speculate that the usual age at which a noble bride could expect the marriage to be consummated would be 14. This is consistent with the date of birth of Elizabeth's first child Emma in 1102 when she would be about 15 to 17.

The marriage produced several children, including most notably two sons who were twins (born 1104 ), and thus remarkable in both surviving and both becoming important noblemen. They are better known to historians of this period as the Beaumont twins, or as Waleran de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and his younger twin Robert Bossu (the Humpback) or Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester . (Readers of Ellis Peters' Cadfael historical mystery series will find both twins mentioned frequently).

Another notable child of this marriage was Elisabeth or Isabel de Beaumont, one of the youngest mistresses of Henry I of England and later mother (by her first marriage) of Richard Strongbow .

Some contemporaries were surprised that the aging Count of Meulan (b circa 1049/1050) was able to father so many children, given how busy he was with turmoil in England and Normandy from 1102 to 1110 (or later) and acting as Henry I's unofficial minister. One explanation is offered below; another might simply be an indication of his good health and energy (expended mostly in dashing from one troublespot in Normandy to England back to Normandy).

William II of England died suddenly in a purported hunting accident, and was hastily succeeded not by the expected heir but by the youngest brother Henry . This seizure of the throne led to an abortive invasion by the older brother Duke Robert of Normandy, followed by an uneasy truce between the brothers, followed by trouble in both England and Normandy for some time (stirred up by Duke Robert, and by an exiled nobleman Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury ). Finally, Henry invaded Normandy and in the Battle of Tinchebray (September 28 , 1106 ) destroyed organized opposition to his takeover of Normandy and imprisoned his ineffectual older brother for his lifetime. Meulan and his brother Warwick were apparently supporters of Henry during this entire period, and Meulan was rewarded with the earldom of Leicester in 1103 . By 1107, Meulan was in possession of substantial lands in three domains. In 1111, he was able to revenge himself on the attack on his seat Meulan by Louis VI of France . He avenged himself by harrying Paris .

Countess of Surrey
Elizabeth, Countess of Meulan apparently tired of her aging husband at some point during the marriage. The historian Planche says (1874) that the Countess was seduced by or fell in love with a younger nobleman, William de Warenne (c. 1071 -11 May 1138 ) himself the thwarted suitor of Edith of Scotland , Queen consort of Henry I of England. Warenne, whose mother Gundred has been alleged (in modern times) to be the Conqueror's daughter and stepdaughter by some genealogists, was said to want a royal bride, and Elizabeth fitted his requirements, even though she was also another man's wife.

In 1115, the Countess was apparently carried off or abducted by Warenne, which abduction apparently concealed a long-standing affair. There was some kind of separation or divorce between Meulan and his wife, which however did not permit her to marry her lover. The elderly Count of Meulan died, supposedly of chagrin and mortification in being thus publicly humiliated, in the Abbey of Preaux, Normandy on 5 June 1118 , leaving his properties to his two elder sons whom he had carefully educated.

Elizabeth married, secondly, William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey , sometime after the death of her first husband. By him, it is alleged, she already had several children (all born during her marriage to Meulan). She also had at least one daughter born while she was living out of wedlock with Warenne (1115-1118). It is unclear whether this daughter was Ada de Warenne, wife of Henry of Scotland or Gundrede de Warenne, wife of Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick (her half-brothers' first cousin).

The later life of Elizabeth de Vermandois is not known. Her sons by her first marriage appear to have a good relationship with their half-brother William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey although on opposing sides for much of the wars between Stephen and Matilda . Her eldest son Waleran, Count of Meulan was active in supporting the disinherited heir William Clito , son of Robert Curthose until captured by King Henry. He was not released until Clito's death without issue in 1128. Her second son Robert inherited his father's English estates and the earldom of Leicester and married the heiress of the Fitzosbern counts of Breteuil. Her daughter Isabel however became a king's concubine or mistress at a young age; it is unclear whether her mother's own life or her eldest brother's political and personal travails in this period played any part in this decision. Before her mother died, Isabel had become wife of Gilbert de Clare , later (1147) Earl of Pembroke, so had adopted a more conventional life like her mother.

There are no known biographies of Elizabeth de Vermandois, nor any known fictional treatments of her life.

Children and descendants
During her first marriage (1096-1115) to Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan (d 5 June 1118), Elizabeth had 3 sons (including twin elder sons) and 6 daughters:
Emma de Beaumont (born 1102 ) whose fate is unknown. She was betrothed as an infant to Aumari, nephew of William, Count of Evreux, but the marriage never took place. She probably died young, or entered a convent.[2]
Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan (born 1104 ) married and left issue.
Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (born 1104 ) married and left issue (his granddaughter Hawisa or Isabella of Gloucester was the unfortunate first wife of King John .
Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (born c. 1106 ) lost his earldom, left issue
Adeline de Beaumont (b ca 1107), married two times:
Hugh IV, 4th Lord of Montfort-sur-Risle to whom she was married firstly by her brother Waleran;
Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)
Aubree (or Alberee) de Beaumont (b ca 1109), married by her brother Waleran to Hugh II of Châteauneuf-en-Thimerais (possibly son of Hugh I of Châteauneuf-en-Thimerais and his wife Mabille de Montgomerie, 2nd daughter of Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury )
Maud de Beaumont (b ca 1111), married by her brother Waleran to William Lovel, or Louvel or Lupel, son of Ascelin Goel, Lord of Ivri.
Isabel de Beaumont (b Aft. 1102), a mistress of King Henry I of England . Married two times:
Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke by whom she was mother of Richard Strongbow , who invaded Ireland 1170 ;
Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland (this marriage is not conclusively proven)
In her second marriage, to William de Warenne, Elizabeth had three sons and two daughters (for a total of fourteen children - nine during her first marriage, and five during her second):
William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne (b. 1119 dspm 1147) whose daughter Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey married 1stly
William, Count of Boulogne (dsp), yr son of King Stephen, and married 2ndly
Hamelin Plantagenet , an illegitimate half-brother of King Henry II of England by whom she had issue, later earls of Surrey and Warenne.
Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy. He married Adeline, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William, whose daughter and sole heir Beatrice married first Dodo, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh;
Ralph de Warenne (dsp)
Gundrada de Warenne , (Gundred) who married first
Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick and had issue; second (as his 2nd wife)
William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Warenne and Surrey and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle; and they had issue.

Ada de Warenne (d. ca. 1178 ), who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon , younger son of King David I of Scotland , Earl of Huntingdon by his marriage to the heiress Matilda or Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon (herself great-niece of William I of England ) and had issue. They were parents to Malcolm IV of Scotland and William I of Scotland and their youngest son became David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon . All Kings of Scotland since 1292 were the descendants of Huntingdon.

The second earl had married Isabella, daughter of Hugh, Count of Vermandois, widow of Robert de Beaumont, earl of Leicester. The arms of Warenne "checky or and azure" were adopted from the Vermandois coat after this marriage.

The original Vermandois arms were "checky or and sable" but there was no black tincture in early medieval heraldry until sable was discovered, being the crushed fur of this animal. A very deep indigo was used instead which faded into blue so the Vermandois arms becams "checky argent and or".
The Vermandois arms were inherited by the earls of Warenne and Surrey, the Newburgh earls of Warwick, the Beauchamp earls of Warwick and Worcester and the Clifford earls of Cumberland.

Isabel married Sir Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester and Count of Meulan,86 son of Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer and Adeline, of Meulan, between 1096 and 1101. The marriage ended in divorce. Robert was born about 1049 in Pont-Audemer, Beaumont, Normandy, France, died on 5 Jun 1118 in Leicestershire, England about age 69, and was buried in Preaux, Normandy, France. Another name for Robert was Robert de Meulan.

Marriage Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 53-24 has m. 1096. Wikipedia has m. abt. 1101.

Noted events in their marriage were:

• Betrothal: to Robert de Meulan, 1096.

Research Notes: First husband of Isabel de Vermandois.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), Line 50-24 (Isabel de Vermandois) has "b. abt 1049, d. 5 Jun 1118, Lord of Beaumont, Pont-Audemer and Brionne, Count of Meulan, cr. 1st Earl of Leicester, Companion of William the Conqueror at Hastings 1066, son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline (or Adelise), dau. of Waleran, Count of Meulan..."

From Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester and Count of Meulan (1049 - June 5 , 1118 ) was a powerful English and French nobleman, revered as one of the wisest men of his age. Chroniclers speak highly of his eloquence, his learning, and three kings of England valued his counsel.
He accompanied William the Conqueror to England in 1066 , where his service earned him more than 91 lordships and manors. When his mother died in 1081 , Robert inherited the title of Count of Meulan in Normandy , also the title of Viscount Ivry and Lord of Norton. He did homage to Philip I of France for these estates and sat as French Peer in the Parliament held at Poissy .

At the Battle of Hastings Robert was appointed leader of the infantry on the right wing of the army.

He and his brother Henry were members of the Royal hunting party in the New Forest , when William Rufus received his mysterious death wound, 2 August 1100 . He then pledged alligience to William Rufus' brother, Henry I of England , who created him Earl of Leicester in 1107.

On the death of William Rufus, William, Count of Evreux and Ralph de Conches made an incursion into Robert's Norman estates, on the pretence that they had suffered injury through some advice that Robert had given to the King; their raid was very successful for they collected a vast booty.
According to Henry of Huntingdon , Robert died of shame after "a certain earl carried off the lady he had espoused, either by some intrigue or by force and stratagem." His wife Isabella remarried in 1118 to William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey .


Family and children
He was the eldest son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan , daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan , and an older brother of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick .

In 1096 he married (Isabel) Elizabeth de Vermandois , daughter of Hugh Magnus and a scion of the French royal family. Their children were:
Emma de Beaumont (born 1102 )
Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (born 1104 )
Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan (born 1104 )
Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (born c. 1106 )
Adeline de Beaumont, married two times:
Hugh IV of Montfort-sur-Risle ;
Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)
Aubree de Beaumont, married Hugh II of Château-neuf-Thimerais.
Maud de Beaumont, married William Lovel. (b. c. 1102)
Isabel de Beaumont, a mistress of King Henry I of England . Married two times:
Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke ;
Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland

Sources
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 50-24, 50-25, 53-24, 53-25, 66-25, 114-29, 140-24, 184-4, 215-24, 215-25
Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 80 F    i. Isabel de Beaumont 91 was born between 1100 and 1107 and died after 1172.

+ 81 F    ii. Emma de Beaumont was born in 1102.

+ 82 M    iii. Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester 92 was born in 1104 in <Leicester>, Leicestershire, England, died on 5 Apr 1168 in England at age 64, and was buried in Leicester Abbey, Leicester, Leicestershire, England. (Relationship to Father: Biological, Relationship to Mother: Biological)

+ 83 M    iv. Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan 93 was born in 1104 in <Meulan, Île-de-France>, France, died on 10 Apr 1166 in Preaux Abbey, Preaux, Normandy, France at age 62, and was buried in Preaux Abbey, Preaux, Normandy, France.

+ 84 M    v. Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford was born about 1106.

+ 85 M    vi. Adeline de Beaumont 94 was born about 1107.

+ 86 F    vii. Aubree de Beaumont 94 was born about 1109.

+ 87 F    viii. Maud de Beaumont was born about 1111.

Isabel next married William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey,95 son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and Gundred, Countess of Surrey, after 1118. William was born about 1065 in <Sussex, England>, died on 11 May 1138 in <England> about age 73, and was buried in Lewes Priory, Lewes, Sussex, England. Other names for William were William Earl of Warren and Surrey, William Earl Warenne, and William Earl of Warenne.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey
William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (died 1138 ), was the son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred . He is more often referred to as Earl Warenne or Earl of Warenne than as Earl of Surrey.

Sometime around 1093 he tried to marry Matilda (or Edith) , daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland . She instead married Henry I of England , and this may be the cause of William's great dislike of Henry I, which was to be his apparent motivator in the following years.
He accompanied Robert Curthose in his 1101 invasion of England , and afterwards lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy . There he complained to Curthose that he expended great effort on the duke's behalf and had in return lost most of his possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up all he had received after the 1101 invasion, and subsequently
William was loyal to king Henry.

To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. He was however dissuaded by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, for any of the daughters would have been within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity . The precise nature of the consanguinous relationship Anselm had in mind has been much debated, but it is most likely he was referring to common descent from the father of duchess Gunnor.

William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.

In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens , and afterwards Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. By this maneuver king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.
He fought at the Battle of Bremule in 1119, and was at Henry's deathbed in 1135.

Family
In 1118 William acquired the royal-blooded bride he desired when married Elizabeth de Vermandois . She was a daughter of count Hugh of Vermandois , a son of Henry I of France , and was the widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester .
By Elizabeth he had three sons and two daughters:
William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey ;
Reginald de Warenne , who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy. He married Adeline, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William, whose daughter and sole heir Beatrice married first Dodo, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh ;
Ralph de Warenne
Gundrada de Warenne , who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick , and second William, lord of Kendal , and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen 's garrison from Warwick Castle ;
Ada de Warenne , who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon

References
C. Warren Hollister, "[The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne ]", Historical Reflections 3 (1976) 83-91
C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (2001)
The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. M. Chibnall, vol. 2, p. 264 (Oxford, 1990).

**********
From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

In her second marriage, to William de Warenne, Elizabeth had three sons and two daughters (for a total of fourteen children - nine during her first marriage, and five during her second):
William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne (b. 1119 dspm 1147) whose daughter Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey married 1stly
William, Count of Boulogne (dsp), yr son of King Stephen, and married 2ndly
Hamelin Plantagenet , an illegitimate half-brother of King Henry II of England by whom she had issue, later earls of Surrey and Warenne.
Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy. He married Adeline, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William, whose daughter and sole heir Beatrice married first Dodo, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh;
Ralph de Warenne (dsp)
Gundrada de Warenne , (Gundred) who married first
Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick and had issue; second (as his 2nd wife)
William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Warenne and Surrey and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle; and they had issue.
Ada de Warenne (d. ca. 1178 ), who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon , younger son of King David I of Scotland , Earl of Huntingdon by his marriage to the heiress Matilda or Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon (herself great-niece of William I of England ) and had issue. They were parents to Malcolm IV of Scotland and William I of Scotland and their youngest son became David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon . All Kings of Scotland since 1292 were the descendants of Huntingdon.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 88 M    i. Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester 92 was born in 1104 in <Leicester>, Leicestershire, England, died on 5 Apr 1168 in England at age 64, and was buried in Leicester Abbey, Leicester, Leicestershire, England. (Relationship to Father: Step, Relationship to Mother: Biological)

+ 89 F    ii. Gundred de Warenne 96 was born about 1117 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, died after 1167 in Warwickshire, England, and was buried in Kelso, Roxburgh, Scotland.

+ 90 M    iii. William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne 97 was born in 1118 and died in 1148 at age 30.

+ 91 F    iv. Ada de Warenne 98 died about 1178.

+ 92 M    v. Reginald de Warenne .

+ 93 M    vi. Ralph de Warenne .

46. Raoul I, Count of Vermandois (Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1). Another name for Raoul was Count Raoul of Vermandois.

Research Notes: Source: Hugh of Vermandois

47. Henry, of Chaumont-en-Vexin (Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in 1130.

Research Notes: Source: Hugh of Vermandois

48. Simon, Bishop of Noyon (Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Hugh of Vermandois

49. Matilde de Vermandois (Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Hugh of Vermandois
Married Raoul I of Beaugency

50. Constance de Vermandois (Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Hugh of Vermandois

Married Godefroy de la Ferte-Gaoucher

51. Agnes de Vermandois (Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Hugh of Vermandois

Married Margrave Boniface del Vasto. ;Mother of Adelaide del Vasto

52. Beatrix de Vermandois (Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Hugh of Vermandois

Married Hugh III of Gournay-en-Bray

53. Emma de Vermandois (Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Hugh of Vermandois

54. Gertrude, of Flanders 60 (Robert I, Count of Flanders29, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1070 and died in 1117 about age 47.

Gertrude married Thierry II, Duke of Lorraine,99 son of Gerard IV, Count of Alsace, Duke of Upper Lorraine and Hedwig, of Namur,. Thierry died in 1115. Other names for Thierry were Dietrich II Duke of Lorraine and Theodoric II "the Valiant" Duke of Lorraine.

Research Notes: Second husband of Gertrude of Flanders.

From Wikipedia - Theodoric II, Duke of Lorraine :

Theodoric II (died 1115), called the Valiant, was the duke of Lorraine from 1070 to his death. He was the son and successor of Gerhard and Hedwige de Namur. He is sometimes numbered Theodoric I if the dukes of the House of Ardennes , who ruled in Upper Lorraine from 959 to 1033, are ignored in favour of the dukes of Lower Lorraine as predecessors of the later dukes of Lorraine.

In fact, Sophia, the daughter of Duke Frederick II of the House of Ardennes, who had inherited the counties of Bar and Montbéliard , had a husband named Louis , who contested the succession. In order to receive the support of his brother, he gave him the county of Vaudémont and convened an assembly of nobles, who elected him duke over Louis. Soon Louis was dead, but his son, Theodoric II of Bar , claimed the succession anyway. However, Emperor Henry IV confirmed Theodoric the Valiant in the duchy. Probably for this reason, Theodoric remained faithful to the emperors throughout his rule. He fought the Saxons while they were at war with the Emperor between 1070 and 1078 and he opposed the popes Gregory VII and Urban II when they were in conflict with the Emperor.

In 1095, he planned to take up the Cross (i.e., go on Crusade , specifically the First ), but his ill health provoked him to drop out, nevertheless convincing his barons to go east. Thereafter, he took little part in imperial affairs, preferring not to intervene between Henry IV and his son Henry , or against Lothair of Supplinburg , duke of Saxony .

Family and children
His first wife was Hedwige (d. 1085 or 1090), daughter of Frederick, count of Formbach , they married around 1075.

They had the following issue:
Simon , his successor in Lorraine
Gertrude (d. 1144), married Floris II of Holland

His second wife was Gertrude (1080-1117), daughter of Robert I of Flanders and Gertrude of Saxony .

They had the following issue:
Theodoric (1100-1168), lord of Bitche and count of Flanders (1128-1168)
Henry I (d. 1165), bishop of Toul
Ida, married Sigefroy (d. 1104), count of Burghausen
Ermengarde, married Bernard de Brancion
Gisela, married Frederick, count of Saarbrücken


The child from this marriage was:

+ 94 M    i. Thierry I, of Lorraine, Count of Flanders 100 was born about 1099 and died on 17 Jan 1168 about age 69.

55. Adela, of Normandy 62 (Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born between 1062 and 1067 and died about 8 Mar 1137. Other names for Adela were Adela of England and Adela of Blois.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Adela of Normandy :

Adela of Normandy also known as Adela of Blois and Adela of England "and also Adela Alice Princess of England" (c. 1062 or 1067 - 8 March 1137?) was, by marriage, Countess of Blois , Chartres , and Meaux . She was a daughter of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders . She was also the mother of Stephen, King of England and Henry of Blois , Bishop of Winchester .

Her birthdate is generally believed to have been between 1060 and 1064; however, there is some evidence she was born after her father's accession to the English throne in 1066. She was the favourite sister of King Henry I of England ; they were probably the youngest of the Conqueror's children. She was a high-spirited and educated woman, with a knowledge of Latin .

She married Stephen Henry , son and heir to the count of Blois , sometime between 1080 and 1084, probably in 1083. Stephen inherited Blois, Chartres and Meaux in 1089, and owned over 300 properties, making him one of the wealthiest men of his day. He was a pious and revered leader who managed huge areas of France which inherited from his father and added to by his sharp administrations. He was, essentially a king in his own right. Stephen-Henry joined the First Crusade , along with his brother-in-law Robert Curthose . Stephen's letters to Adela form a uniquely intimate insight into the experiences of the Crusade's leaders. The Count of Blois returned to France in 1100 bringing with him several cartloads of maps, jewels and other treasures, which he deposited at Chartres. He was, however, under an obligation to the pope for agreements made years earlier and returned to Antioch to participate in the crusade of 1101 . He was ultimately killed in an ill advised charge at the Battle of Ramla . Rumors of his cowardice and defection under fire are untrue and unfounded and have been proven to be propaganda generated by later biased historians. Stephen-Henry was often referred to as "le Sage," and was a great patron of Troubadours and writers.

Adela and Stephen's children are listed here as follows. Their birth order is uncertain.
Guillaume (William)(d. 1150), Count of Chartres married Agnes of Sulli (d. aft 1104) and had issue.
Theobald II, aka Thibaud IV Count of Champagne
Odo of Blois, aka Humbert. died young.
Stephen of Blois {King of England}.
Lucia-Mahaut , married Richard d'Avranches, 2nd Earl of Chester . Both drowned on 25 November 1120.
Agnes of Blois, married Hugh de Puiset and were parents to Hugh de Puiset .
Eléonore of Blois (d. 1147) married Raoul I of Vermandois (d.1152) & had issue they were divorced in 1142.
Alix of Blois (d. 1145) married Renaud (d.1134)III of Joigni & had Issue
Lithuise of Blois (d. 1118) married Milo I of Montlhéry (Divorced 1115)
Philip (d. 1100) Bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne
Henry of Blois b.1101- d. 1171 (oblate child raised at Cherite sur Loire (Cluny Abbey) 1103.

Adela was regent for her husband during his extended absence as a leader of the First Crusade (1095-1098), and when he returned in disgrace it was at least in part at her urging that he returned to the east to fulfil his vow of seeing Jerusalem .[citation needed ] She was again regent in 1101, continuing after her husband's death on this second crusading expedition in 1102, for their children were still minors. Orderic Vitalis praises her as a "wise and spirited woman" who ably governed her husband's estates in his absences and after his death.

She employed tutors to educate her elder sons, and had her youngest son Henry pledged to the Church at Cluny . Adela quarrelled with her eldest son Guillaume, "deficient in intelligence as well as degenerate", and had his younger brother Theobald replace him as heir. Her son Stephen left Blois in 1111 to join his uncle's court in England.

Adela retired to Marcigny in 1120, secure in the status of her children. Later that same year, her daughter Lucia-Mahaut , was drowned in the wreck of the White Ship alongside her husband. She lived long enough to see her son Stephen seize the English throne, and took pride in the ascension of her youngest child Henry Blois to the bishophric of Winchester, but died soon after on 8 March 1135 in Marsilly, Charente, Poitou-Charentes, France.

Adela married Stephen, of Blois, Count of Blois 101 about 1080. Stephen was born about 1045 and died on 19 May 1102 in Ramla, (Israel) about age 57. Other names for Stephen were Stephen II of Blois and Stephen II Henry Count of Blois.

Death Notes: Killed in the battle of Ramla.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Stephen II, Count of Blois L

Stephen II Henry (c. 1045 - 19 May 1102 ), (in French , Étienne Henri), Count of Blois and Count of Chartres , was the son of Theobald III , count of Blois , and Garsinde du Maine. He married Adela of Normandy , a daughter of William the Conqueror around 1080 in Chartres .

Count Stephen was one of the leaders of the First Crusade , often writing enthusiastic letters to Adela about the crusade 's progress. He returned home in 1098 during the lengthy siege of Antioch , without fulfilling his crusading vow to forge a way to Jerusalem . He was pressured by Adela into making a second pilgrimage, and joined the minor crusade of 1101 in the company of others who had also returned home prematurely. In 1102, Stephen was killed in the Battle of Ramla at the age of fifty-seven.

Family and children
Stephen and Adela's children were:
William, Count of Sully (d.1150), Count of Chartres married Agnes of Sulli (d. aft 1104) and had issue.
Theobald II, Count of Champagne
Odo, died young.
Stephen, King of England
Lucia-Mahaut , married Richard d'Avranches, 2nd Earl of Chester . Both drowned on 25 November 1120 .
Agnes, married Hugh III of Le Puiset
Eléonore (d. 1147) married Raoul I of Vermandois (d. 1152) and had issue; they were divorced in 1142.
Alix (d. 1145) married Renaud III of Joigni (d. 1134) and had issue
Lithuise (d. 1118) married Milo de Brai , Viscount of Troyes (divorced 1115)
Henry, Bishop of Winchester
Humbert, died young.

Lithuise
, who married Milon of Troyes , viscount of Troyes , was possibly his sister and not his daughter, judging from the dates of her children.

He had an illegitimate daughter Emma, who was the mother of William of York , archbishop of York .[1]

Noted events in his life were:

• Leader of the First Crusade:

Children from this marriage were:

+ 95 M    i. Stephen, of Blois, King of England 102 was born about 1096 in Blois, Loire-et-Cher, France, died on 25 Oct 1154 in Dover Priory, Dover, England about age 58, and was buried in Faversham Abbey.

+ 96 F    ii. Lithuaise .103

56. Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England 63 (Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born between May 1068 and May 1069 in <Selby, Yorkshire>, England and died on 1 Dec 1135 in St. Denis-le-Fermont, France. Other names for Henry were Henry I King of England and Henry I Beauclerc King of England.

Birth Notes: Ancestral Roots line 124-25 has b. 1070.

Research Notes: Fourth son of William the Conqueror.

From Wikipedia - Henry I of England :

Henry I (c. 1068/1069 - 1 December 1135) was the fourth son of William I the Conqueror . He succeeded his elder brother William II as King of England in 1100 and defeated his eldest brother, Robert Curthose , to become Duke of Normandy in 1106. He was called Beauclerc for his scholarly interests and Lion of Justice for refinements which he brought about in the administrative and legislative machinery of the time.

Henry's reign is noted for its political opportunism. His succession was confirmed while his brother Robert was away on the First Crusade and the beginning of his reign was occupied by wars with Robert for control of England and Normandy. He successfully reunited the two realms again after their separation on his father's death in 1087. Upon his succession he granted the baronage a Charter of Liberties , which formed a basis for subsequent challenges to rights of kings and presaged Magna Carta , which subjected the King to law.

The rest of Henry's reign was filled with judicial and financial reforms. He established the biannual Exchequer to reform the treasury . He used itinerant officials to curb abuses of power at the local and regional level, garnering the praise of the people. The differences between the English and Norman populations began to break down during his reign and he himself married a daughter of the old English royal house. He made peace with the church after the disputes of his brother's reign, but he could not smooth out his succession after the disastrous loss of his eldest son William in the wreck of the White Ship . His will stipulated that he was to be succeeded by his daughter, the Empress Matilda , but his stern rule was followed by a period of civil war known as the Anarchy .

Early life
Henry was born between May 1068 and May 1069, probably in Selby in Yorkshire . His mother, Queen Matilda , was descended from Alfred the Great (but not through the main West Saxon Royal line). Queen Matilda named the infant Prince Henry, after her uncle, Henry I of France . As the youngest son of the family, he was almost certainly expected to become a Bishop and was given rather more extensive schooling than was usual for a young nobleman of that time. The Chronicler William of Malmesbury asserts that Henry once remarked that an illiterate King was a crowned ass. He was certainly the first Norman ruler to be fluent in the English language .

William I's second son Richard was killed in a hunting accident in 1081, so William bequeathed his dominions to his three surviving sons in the following manner:
Robert received the Duchy of Normandy and became Duke Robert II
William Rufus received the Kingdom of England and became King William II
Henry Beauclerc received 5,000 pounds in silver

The Chronicler Orderic Vitalis reports that the old King had declared to Henry: "You in your own time will have all the dominions I have acquired and be greater than both your brothers in wealth and power."

Henry tried to play his brothers off against each other but eventually, wary of his devious manoeuvring, they acted together and signed an Accession Treaty. This sought to bar Prince Henry from both Thrones by stipulating that if either King William or Duke Robert died without an heir, the two dominions of their father would be reunited under the surviving brother.

Seizing the throne of England

When, on 2 August 1100 , William II was killed by an arrow in yet another hunting accident in the New Forest, Duke Robert had not yet returned from the First Crusade . His absence allowed Prince Henry to seize the Royal Treasury at Winchester, Hampshire , where he buried his dead brother. There are suspicions that, on hearing that Robert was returning alive from his crusade with a new bride, Henry decided to act and arranged the murder of William by the French Vexin Walter Tirel .[1] Thus he succeeded to the throne of England, guaranteeing his succession in defiance of William and Robert's earlier agreement. Henry was accepted as King by the leading Barons and was crowned three days later on 5 August at Westminster Abbey . He secured his position among the nobles by an act of political appeasement: he issued a Charter of Liberties which is considered a forerunner of the Magna Carta .

First marriage

On 11 November 1100 Henry married Edith , daughter of King Malcolm III of Scotland. Since Edith was also the niece of Edgar Atheling and the great-granddaughter of Edward the Confessor 's paternal half-brother Edmund Ironside , the marriage united the Norman line with the old English line of Kings. The marriage greatly displeased the Norman Barons, however, and as a concession to their sensibilities Edith changed her name to Matilda upon becoming Queen. The other side of this coin, however, was that Henry, by dint of his marriage, became far more acceptable to the Anglo-Saxon populace.

The chronicler William of Malmesbury described Henry thus: "He was of middle stature, greater than the small, but exceeded by the very tall; his hair was black and set back upon the forehead; his eyes mildly bright; his chest brawny; his body fleshy."

Conquest of Normandy
In the following year, 1101, Robert Curthose , Henry's eldest brother, attempted to seize the crown by invading England. In the Treaty of Alton , Robert agreed to recognise his brother Henry as King of England and return peacefully to Normandy , upon receipt of an annual sum of 2000 silver marks, which Henry proceeded to pay.

In 1105, to eliminate the continuing threat from Robert and the drain on his fiscal resources from the annual payment, Henry led an expeditionary force across the English Channel .

Battle of Tinchebray
On the morning of 28 September 1106, exactly 40 years after William had made his way to England, the decisive battle between his two surviving sons, Robert Curthose and Henry Beauclerc, took place in the small village of Tinchebray. This combat was totally unexpected and unprepared. Henry and his army were marching south from Barfleur on their way to Domfront and Robert was marching with his army from Falaise on their way to Mortain. They met at the crossroads at Tinchebray and the running battle which ensued was spread out over several kilometres. The site where most of the fighting took place is the village playing field today. Towards evening Robert tried to retreat but was captured by Henry's men at a place three kilometres (just under two miles) north of Tinchebray where a farm named "Prise" (taken) stands today on the D22 road. The tombstones of three knights are nearby on the same road.

King of England and Ruler of Normandy
After Henry had defeated his brother's Norman army at Tinchebray he imprisoned Robert, initially in the Tower of London , subsequently at Devizes Castle and later at Cardiff. One day whilst out riding Robert attempted to escape from Cardiff but his horse was bogged down in a swamp and he was recaptured. To prevent further escapes Henry had Robert's eyes burnt out. Henry appropriated the Duchy of Normandy as a possession of the Kingdom of England and reunited his father's dominions. Even after taking control of the Duchy of Normandy he didn't take the title of Duke, he chose to control it as the King of England.

In 1113, Henry attempted to reduce difficulties in Normandy by betrothing his eldest son, William Adelin , to the daughter of Fulk of Jerusalem (also known as Fulk V), Count of Anjou, then a serious enemy. They were married in 1119. Eight years later, after William's untimely death, a much more momentous union was made between Henry's daughter, (the former Empress) Matilda and Fulk's son Geoffrey Plantagenet , which eventually resulted in the union of the two Realms under the Plantagenet Kings.


Activities as a King

Henry's need for finance to consolidate his position led to an increase in the activities of centralized government. As King, Henry carried out social and judicial reforms, including:
issuing the Charter of Liberties
restoring the laws of Edward the Confessor .

Between 1103 and 1107 Henry was involved in a dispute with Anselm , the Archbishop of Canterbury , and Pope Paschal II in the investiture controversy , which was settled in the Concordat of London in 1107. It was a compromise. In England, a distinction was made in the King's chancery between the secular and ecclesiastical powers of the prelates. Employing the distinction, Henry gave up his right to invest his bishops and abbots, but reserved the custom of requiring them to come and do homage for the "temporalities " (the landed properties tied to the episcopate), directly from his hand, after the bishop had sworn homage and feudal vassalage in the ceremony called commendatio, the commendation ceremony , like any secular vassal.

Henry was also known for some brutal acts. He once threw a treacherous burgher named Conan Pilatus from the tower of Rouen; the tower was known from then on as "Conan's Leap". In another instance that took place in 1119, Henry's son-in-law, Eustace de Pacy, and Ralph Harnec, the constable of Ivry , exchanged their children as hostages. When Eustace blinded Harnec's son, Harnec demanded vengeance. King Henry allowed Harnec to blind and mutilate Eustace's two daughters, who were also Henry's own grandchildren. Eustace and his wife, Juliane, were outraged and threatened to rebel. Henry arranged to meet his daughter at a parley at Breteuil, only for Juliane to draw a crossbow and attempt to assassinate her father. She was captured and confined to the castle, but escaped by leaping from a window into the moat below. Some years later Henry was reconciled with his daughter and son-in-law.

Legitimate children
He had two children by Matilda (Edith), who died on 1 May 1118 at the palace of Westminster. She was buried in Westminster Abbey.
Matilda . (c. February 1102 - 10 September 1167 ). She married firstly Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor , and secondly, Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou , having issue by the second.
William Adelin , (5 August 1103 - 25 November 1120 ). He married Matilda (d.1154), daughter of Fulk V, Count of Anjou .

Second marriage
On 29 January 1121 he married Adeliza , daughter of Godfrey I of Leuven , Duke of Lower Lotharingia and Landgrave of Brabant , but there were no children from this marriage. Left without male heirs, Henry took the unprecedented step of making his barons swear to accept his daughter Empress Matilda , widow of Henry V, the Holy Roman Emperor , as his heir.

Death and legacy

Henry visited Normandy in 1135 to see his young grandsons, the children of Matilda and Geoffrey. He took great delight in his grandchildren, but soon quarrelled with his daughter and son-in-law and these disputes led him to tarry in Normandy far longer than he originally planned.

Henry died on 1 December 1135 of food poisoning from eating "a surfeit of lampreys " (of which he was excessively fond) at Saint-Denis-en-Lyons (now Lyons-la-Forêt ) in Normandy. His remains were sewn into the hide of a bull to preserve them on the journey, and then taken back to England and were buried at Reading Abbey , which he had founded fourteen years before. The Abbey was destroyed during the Protestant Reformation . No trace of his tomb has survived, the probable site being covered by St James' School. Nearby is a small plaque and a large memorial cross stands in the adjoining Forbury Gardens .

Although Henry's barons had sworn allegiance to his daughter as their Queen, her gender and her remarriage into the House of Anjou , an enemy of the Normans, allowed Henry's nephew Stephen of Blois , to come to England and claim the throne with popular support.

The struggle between the former Empress and Stephen resulted in a long civil war known as the Anarchy . The dispute was eventually settled by Stephen's naming of Matilda's son, Henry Plantagenet , as his heir in 1153.

Illegitimate children
King Henry is famed for holding the record for the largest number of acknowledged illegitimate children born to any English king, with the number being around 20 or 25. He had many mistresses, and identifying which mistress is the mother of which child is difficult. His illegitimate offspring for whom there is documentation are:
Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester . Often, said to have been a son of Sybil Corbet.
Maud FitzRoy, married Conan III, Duke of Brittany
Constance FitzRoy, married Richard de Beaumont
Mabel FitzRoy, married William III Gouet
Aline FitzRoy, married Matthieu I of Montmorency
Gilbert FitzRoy, died after 1142. His mother may have been a sister of Walter de Gand.
Emma, born c. 1138; married Gui de Laval, Lord Laval. [Uncertain, born 2 years after Henry died.][2]

With Edith
Matilda, married in 1103 Count Rotrou II of Perche. She perished 25 Nov 1120 in the wreck of the White Ship . She left two daughters; Philippa who married Helie of Anjou (son of Fulk V) and Felice.

With Gieva de Tracy
William de Tracy

With Ansfride
Ansfride was born c. 1070. She was the wife of Anskill of Seacourt, at Wytham in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire ).
Juliane de Fontevrault (born c. 1090); married Eustace de Pacy in 1103. She tried to shoot her father with a crossbow after King Henry allowed her two young daughters to be blinded.
Fulk FitzRoy (born c. 1092); a monk at Abingdon .
Richard of Lincoln (c. 1094 - 25 November 1120 ); perished in the wreck of the White Ship .

With Sybil Corbet
Lady Sybilla Corbet of Alcester was born in 1077 in Alcester in Warwickshire . She married Herbert FitzHerbert, son of Herbert 'the Chamberlain' of Winchester and Emma de Blois. She died after 1157 and was also known as Adela (or Lucia) Corbet. Sybil was definitely mother of Sybil and Rainald, possibly also of William and Rohese. Some sources suggest that there was another daughter by this relationship, Gundred, but it appears that she was thought as such because she was a sister of Reginald de Dunstanville but it appears that that was another person of that name who was not related to this family.
Sybilla de Normandy , married Alexander I of Scotland .
William Constable, born before 1105. Married Alice (Constable); died after 1187.
Reginald de Dunstanville, 1st Earl of Cornwall .
Gundred of England (1114-46), married 1130 Henry de la Pomeroy, son of Joscelin de la Pomerai.
Rohese of England, born 1114; married William de Tracy (b. 1040 in Normandy, France d. 1110 in Barnstaple, Devon, England)son of Turgisus de Tracy. They married in 1075. They had four children 1)Turgisus II de Tracy b. 1066, 2) Henry de Tracy b. 1068, 3) Gieva de Tracy b. 1068 d. 1100, 4)Henry of Barnstaple Tracy b. 1070 d.1170.

With Edith FitzForne
Robert FitzEdith, Lord Okehampton, (1093-1172) married Dame Maud d'Avranches du Sap. They had one daughter, Mary, who married Renaud, Sire of Courtenay (son of Miles, Sire of Courtenay and Ermengarde of Nevers).
Adeliza FitzEdith. Appears in charters with her brother Robert.

With Princess Nest
Nest ferch Rhys was born about 1073 at Dinefwr Castle , Carmarthenshire , the daughter of Prince Rhys ap Tewdwr of Deheubarth and his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhywallon. She married, in 1095, to Gerald de Windsor (aka Geraldus FitzWalter) son of Walter FitzOther, Constable of Windsor Castle and Keeper of the Forests of Berkshire . She had several other liaisons - including one with Stephen of Cardigan, Constable of Cardigan (1136) - and subsequently other illegitimate children. The date of her death is unknown.
Henry FitzRoy , 1103-1158.

With Isabel de Beaumont
Isabel (Elizabeth) de Beaumont (after 1102 - after 1172), daughter of Robert de Beaumont , sister of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester . She married Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke , in 1130. She was also known as Isabella de Meulan.
Isabel Hedwig of England
Matilda FitzRoy , abbess of Montvilliers, also known as Montpiller

Noted events in his life were:

• King of England: 1100-1135.

Henry married Matilda, of Scotland, daughter of Malcolm III Canmore, King of Scots and Saint Margaret, of Scotland, on 11 Nov 1100 in Westminster Abbey, London, Midlesex, England. Matilda was born in 1079 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland and died on 1 May 1118 in Westminster Palace, London, England at age 39. Other names for Matilda were Edith of Scotland and Maud of Scotland.

Birth Notes: Place name may be Dermfermline.

Research Notes: Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 1-22

From Wikipedia - Matilda of Scotland :

Matilda of Scotland
[1] (born Edith; c. 1080 - 1 May 1118) was the first wife and queen consort of Henry I .

Matilda was born around 1080 in Dunfermline , the daughter of Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret . She was christened Edith, and Robert Curthose stood as godfather at her christening - the English queen Matilda of Flanders was also present at the font and may have been her godmother.
When she was about six years old, Matilda (or Edith as she was then probably still called) and her sister Mary were sent to Romsey , where their aunt Cristina was abbess. During her stay at Romsey and Wilton , The Scottish princess was much sought-after as a bride; she turned down proposals from both William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey , and Alan Rufus , Lord of Richmond. Hermann of Tournai even claims that William II Rufus considered marrying her. She was out of the monastery by 1093, when Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury, wrote to the Bishop of Salisbury ordering that the daughter of the king of Scotland be returned to the monastery that she had left.

After the death of William II Rufus in August 1100, his brother Henry quickly seized the royal treasury and the royal crown. His next task was to marry, and Henry's choice fell on Matilda. Because Matilda had spent most of her life in a nunnery, there was some controversy over whether or not she had been veiled as a nun and would thus be ineligible for marriage. Henry sought permission for the marriage from Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury , who returned to England in September 1100 after a long exile. Professing himself unwilling to decide so weighty a matter on his own, Anselm called a council of bishops in order to determine the legality of the proposed marriage. Matilda testified to the archbishop and the assembled bishops of the realm that she had never taken holy vows. She insisted that her parents had sent her and her sister to England for educational purposes, and that her aunt Cristina had veiled her only to protect her "from the lust of the Normans ." Matilda claimed she had pulled the veil off and stamped on it, and her aunt beat and scolded her most horribly for this. The council concluded that Matilda had never been a nun, nor had her parents intended that she become one, and gave their permission for the marriage.
Matilda and Henry seem to have known one another for some time before their marriage - William of Malmesbury states that Henry had "long been attached" to her, and Orderic Vitalis says that Henry had "long adored" Edith's character. Through her mother she was descended from Edmund Ironside and thus Alfred the Great and the old line of the kings of Wessex; this was very important as Henry wanted to help make himself more popular with the English people and Matilda represented the old English dynasty. In their children the Norman and Anglo-Saxon dynasties would be united. Another benefit of the marriage was that England and Scotland became politically closer; three of her brothers served as kings of Scotland and were unusually friendly to England during this period.

After Matilda and Henry were married on 11 November 1100 at Westminster Abbey by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury , she was crowned as "Matilda", a fashionable Norman name. She gave birth to a daughter, Matilda, in February 1102, and a son, William, in November 1103. As queen, she maintained her court primarily at Westminster , but accompanied her husband in his travels all across England, and, circa 1106-1107, probably visited Normandy with him. She also served in a vice-regal capacity when Henry was away from court. Her court was filled with musicians and poets; she commissioned a monk, probably Thurgot , to write a biography of her mother, Saint Margaret . She was an active queen, and like her mother was renowned for her devotion to religion and the poor. William of Malmesbury describes her as attending church barefoot at Lent , and washing the feet and kissing the hands of the sick. She also administered extensive dower properties and was known as a patron of the arts, especially music.

After Matilda died on 1 May 1118 at Westminster Palace , she was buried at Westminster Abbey . The death of her only son and Henry's failure to produce a legitimate son from his second marriage led to the succession crisis of The Anarchy .


Children from this marriage were:

+ 97 F    i. EmpressMatilda, Countess of Anjou 104 was born about 7 Feb 1102 and died on 10 Sep 1167 about age 65.

+ 98 M    ii. William Adelin, Duke of Normandy 105 was born in 1103 and died on 25 Nov 1120 at age 17.

Henry next married someone.

His child was:

+ 99 F    i. Maud, Princess of England 106 was born about 1091 in England.

Henry had a relationship with Adeliza, of Louvain,107 daughter of Godefroi de Louvain, Duc de Basse-Lorraine and Ida, of Chiny and Namur, in 1120. This couple did not marry. Adeliza was born about 1103 and was buried on 23 Apr 1151 in Abbey of Affligem. Another name for Adeliza was Adela of Louvain. They had no children.

Research Notes: 2nd wife of Henry I

Henry next had a relationship with Sybilla Corbet, of Alcester.108 This couple did not marry. Sybilla was born in 1077 in Alcester, Warwickshire, England and died after 1157.

Research Notes: May not have been the mother of Robert de Caen.

From Wikipedia - Henry I of England :

With Sybil Corbet
Lady Sybilla Corbet of Alcester was born in 1077 in Alcester in Warwickshire . She married Herbert FitzHerbert, son of Herbert 'the Chamberlain' of Winchester and Emma de Blois. She died after 1157 and was also known as Adela (or Lucia) Corbet. Sybil was definitely mother of Sybil and Rainald, possibly also of William and Rohese. Some sources suggest that there was another daughter by this relationship, Gundred, but it appears that she was thought as such because she was a sister of Reginald de Dunstanville but it appears that that was another person of that name who was not related to this family.

Sybilla de Normandy , married Alexander I of Scotland .
William Constable, born before 1105. Married Alice (Constable); died after 1187.
Reginald de Dunstanville, 1st Earl of Cornwall .
Gundred of England (1114-46), married 1130 Henry de la Pomeroy, son of Joscelin de la Pomerai.
Rohese of England, born 1114; married William de Tracy (b. 1040 in Normandy, France d. 1110 in Barnstaple, Devon, England)son of Turgisus de Tracy. They married in 1075. They had four children 1)Turgisus II de Tracy b. 1066, 2) Henry de Tracy b. 1068, 3) Gieva de Tracy b. 1068 d. 1100, 4)Henry of Barnstaple Tracy b. 1070 d.1170.


Their child was:

+ 100 M    i. Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester 109 was born about 1090 in <Caen, Normandy, France>, died on 31 Oct 1147 in Bristol, Gloucestershire, England about age 57, and was buried in St. James Priory, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.

Henry next had a relationship with Elizabeth de, Beaumont,110 daughter of Robert I de Beaumont and Unknown,. This couple did not marry.

Their child was:

+ 101 F    i. Elizabeth, Princess of England 111 was born about 1095 in <Talby, Yorkshire, England>.

57. Henry I, Duke of Bavaria 66 (Judith, of Normandy31, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1074 and died on 13 Dec 1126 at age 52.

Henry married Wulfhilda, of Saxony,112 daughter of Magnus, Duke of Saxony and Sophia, Betw 1095 and 1100. Wulfhilda was born about 1075 and died on 29 Dec 1126 about age 51.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 102 F    i. Judith, of Bavaria was born in 1100 and died in 1130 at age 30.

58. Hugh I, Duke of Burgundy (Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1057 and died in 1093 at age 36.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia (Henry of Burgundy)

59. Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy 67 (Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1058 and died on 23 Mar 1103 in Cilicia about age 45. Other names for Eudes were Eudes I "the Red" of Burgundy and Eudes I Borel of Burgundy.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy :

Eudes I, surnamed Borel and called the Red, (1058-23 March 1103 ) was Duke of Burgundy between 1079 and 1103. Eudes was the second son of Henry of Burgundy and grandson of Robert I . He became the duke following the abdication of his older brother, Hugh I, who retired to become a Benedictine monk. Eudes married Sibylla of Burgundy (1065 - 1101), daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy .

They had:
Florine of Burgundy 1083-1097
Helie of Burgundy 1080-1141 wife of Bertrand of Toulouse and William III of Ponthieu
Hugh II of Burgundy
Henry d.1131

An interesting incident is reported of this robber baron by an eyewitness, Eadmer , biographer of Anselm of Canterbury . While Saint Anselm was progressing through Eudes's territory on his way to Rome in 1097, the bandit, expecting great treasure in the archbishop's retinue, prepared to ambush and loot it. Coming upon the prelate's train, the duke asked for the archbishop, whom they had not found. Anselm promptly came forward and took the duke by surprise, saying "My lord duke, suffer me to embrace thee." The flabbergasted duke immediately allowed the bishop to embrace him and offered himself as Anselm's humble servant.

He was a participant in the ill-fated Crusade of 1101 .

Noted events in his life were:

• Duke of Burgundy: 1079-1103.

Eudes married Sibylle, of Burgundy-Ivrea,113 daughter of Guillaume I de Bourgogne and Stephanie, de Longwy, in 1080. Sibylle died after 1103. Another name for Sibylle was Matilda of Burgundy-Ivrea.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 103 F    i. Hélie, of Burgundy 114 was born about 1080 and died on 28 Feb 1141 in Abbey of Perseigne about age 61.

Eudes next married Mathilda, of Burgundy 115 in France. Mathilda was born about 1062 and died in 1093 about age 31.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 104 F    i. Alix de Bourgogne 116 was born in 1094 in Burgundy, France and died on 28 Feb 1142 at age 48.

60. Robert, Bishop of Langres (Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1059 and died in 1111 at age 52.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy

61. Beatrice, of Burgundy 68 (Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1063 and died after 1110.

Beatrice married Guy III de Vignory, Seigneur de Vignory,117 son of Guy II "le Rouge" de Vignory and Hildegarde de Bar-sur-Aube, after 1082. Guy died 1125 or 1126.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots has d. 1125 and d. 1126


The child from this marriage was:

+ 105 F    i. Adélarde de Vignory 118 died after 1140.

62. Reginald, Abbot of St. Pierre (Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1065 and died in 1092 at age 27.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy



63. Henry, of Burgundy, Count of Portugal 69 (Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1069 in <Bourgogne, Champagne>, France and died on 1 Nov 1112 at age 43. Other names for Henry were Henri of Burgundy, Count of Portugal, Henrique of Burgundy, Count of Portugal, Henry I de Bourgogne, and Henry I Count of Portugal.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Henry, Count of Portugal :

Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal (1066 -1112 ) was Count of Portugal from 1093 to his death. He was the son of Henry of Burgundy , heir of Robert I, Duke of Burgundy , and brother of Hugh I, Duke of Burgundy and Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy . His name is Henri in modern French , Henricus in Latin , Enrique in modern Spanish and Henrique in modern Portuguese . He was a distant cousin of Raymond of Burgundy and Pope Callistus II .
As a younger son, Henry had little chances of acquiring fortune and titles by inheritance, thus he joined the Reconquista against the Moors in the Iberian Peninsula . He helped king Alfonso VI of Castile and León conquer modern Galicia and the north of Portugal and in reward he married Alfonso's daughter Theresa, Countess of Portugal in 1093 , receiving the County of Portugal , then a fiefdom of the Kingdom of León , as a dowry .

From Teresa, Henry had three sons and three daughters. The only son to survive childhood was Afonso Henriques , who became the second Count of Portugal in 1112. However, the young man Afonso was energetic and expanded his dominions at the expense of Muslims . In 1139 , he declared himself King of Portugal after reneging the subjugation to León, in open confrontation with his mother. Two daughters also survived childhood, Urraca and Sancha. Urraca Henriques married a Bermudo Peres de Trava, Count of Trastamara. Sancha Henriques married a nobleman, Sancho Nunes de Celanova.

Henry married Theresa, of Leon and Castile,72 daughter of Alfonso VI "the Brave", of Castile, King of Castile and Leon and Ximena Nunia de Guzman, in 1093. Theresa was born about 1070 in <Toledo, Castile>, Spain and died on 1 Nov 1130 about age 60. Another name for Theresa was Teresa Alfonsez of Léon and Castile.

Research Notes: Natural daughter of Alkfonso VI by his mistress Ximena Nunia de Guzman.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 106 M    i. Afonso I, King of Portugal 119 was born on 25 Jul 1109 in Viseu, Viseu, Portugal, died on 6 Dec 1185 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal at age 76, and was buried in Santa Cruz Monastery, Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

64. Helie (Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: A nun.

Source: Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy

65. Urraca, of Castile, Queen of Castile and Léon 71 (Constance, of Burgundy33, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1082 in <Burgos, Castile>, Spain and died on 8 Mar 1126 in Saldana, Palencia, Spain about age 44. Other names for Urraca were Urraca of Léon, Urraca I Queen of Léon and Castile, and Urraca Alfonsez of Castile and Léon.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Urraca of León and Castile :

Urraca of León (1078 - March 8 , 1126 ) was Queen of León and Castile from 1109 to her death. She was the first woman ever to reign in a western European monarchy. Urraca was the daughter of Alfonso VI of León by his second wife, Constance of Burgundy . She became heiress to her father's kingdom after her only brother was killed in the Battle of Uclés (1108) .
In childhood, she was betrothed to and later married Raymond of Burgundy who died in September 1107. They had two children: the Infante Alfonso Raimúndez (born 1104) and the Infanta Sancha (born before 1095). The widow Urraca was now ruler of Galicia, and as She her father's only surviving legitimate child, she could claim to be heiress of the reign of Castile. King Alfonso VI of León selected the king of Navarre and Aragon, Alfonso I of Aragon as her husband. They had hoped for an alliance that would safeguard the kingdom, since Alfonso was renowned as a great warrior. However, the marriage proved barren and turned exceedingly bitter. According to the chronicler Ibn al-Athir , Alfonso once remarked that "a real soldier lives with men, not with women".

Urraca and Alfonso of Aragon were also second cousins, and Bernard, Archbishop of Toledo , objected to the marriage on these grounds and condemned it as consanguineous . Nevertheless, Urraca and Alfonso were married in October 1109 in Monzón . Their inability to produce a child created a rift, and Urraca accused Alfonso of being physically abusive to her. The royal couple were soon separated. By October of 1110 or 1111, her supporters fought a battle against Alfonso's forces at Candespina , in which her premier nobleman and former aspirant to her hand, count Gómez González , was killed. A further defeat was inflicted at Viadangos , at which Pedro Froilaz de Traba was captured. Their marriage was annulled in 1114. Urraca never remarried, though she took as lover another powerful nobleman, count Pedro González de Lara.

Urraca's reign was disturbed by strife among the powerful nobles and especially by constant warfare with her husband who had seized her lands. Another thorn on her side was her brother-in-law, Henry , the husband of her half-sister Teresa of Leon . He alternatively allied with Alfonso I of Aragon , then betrayed Alfonso for a better offer from Urraca's court. After Henry's death in 1112, his widow, Teresa, still contested ownership of lands with Urraca. With the aid of her son, Alfonso Raimúndez, Urraca was able to win back much of her domain and ruled successfully for many years.
According to the Chronicon Compostellanum , Urraca died in childbirth in 1126. The supposed father was her lover, Count Pedro González of Lara. However the author of the chronicles was openly hostile to the adulterous queen, and the historian Reilly notes that a pregnancy was unlikely at the queen's age of 48. She was succeeded by her legitimate son, Alfonso VII .

Illegitimate children
Besides her two legitimate children by Raymond of Burgundy, Urraca also had an illegitimate son by her lover, Pedro González de Lara. She recognized their son, Fernando Perez Furtado , in 1123.

Noted events in her life were:

• Queen of Léon and Castile: 1109-1126.

Urraca married Raymond, of Burgundy, Count of Amous,120 son of Guillaume I de Bourgogne and Stephanie, de Longwy, about 1087 in Toledo, Castile, Spain. Raymond was born about 1060 in <Dijon>, France and died on 26 Mar 1107 in Grajal do Campos, Léon, Spain about age 47. Other names for Raymond were Raimundo of Burgundy and Raymond de Bourgogne.

Birth Notes: FamilySearch has b. abt 1065

Death Notes: Wikipedia has d. September 1107. FamilySearch has d. 24 Mar 1107.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Raymond of Burgundy :

Raymond of Burgundy (Spanish and Portuguese : Raimundo) was the fourth son of William I, Count of Burgundy and was Count of Amous . He came to the Iberian Peninsula for the first time during the period 1086-1087 with Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy . He came for the second time (1090) to marry Urraca of Castile , eventual heiress of Alfonso VI of Castile , King of León and Castile .
He came with his cousin Henry of Burgundy , who married the other daughter of Alfonso VI, Teresa of León (or Portugal ). By his marriage Raymond received the County of Galicia , the County of Portugal and the County of Coimbra . The last two were later offered to Henry of Burgundy, father of the first Portuguese King Afonso I Henriques of Portugal .

He was succeeded by his son:
Alfonso VII of Castile and Leon (1104/1105-1157)


Children from this marriage were:

+ 107 F    i. InfantaSancha was born before 1095.

+ 108 M    ii. Alfonso VII, King of Castile and Léon 121 was born on 1 Mar 1105 in Toledo, Castile, Spain, died on 21 Aug 1157 in La Fresneda, Teruel, Aragon, Spain at age 52, and was buried in Catedral De Toledo, Toledo, Castile.

66. Aelis de Dammartin 72 (Hugues de Dammartin, Count of Dammartin34, Constance Capet18, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1084 in Dammartin-en-Goele, Seine-et-Marne, France.

Aelis married Aubrey, de Mello,72 son of Gilbert, Baron of Mello and Unknown, about 1104. Aubrey was born about 1080 in <Mello, Oise>, France. Another name for Aubrey was Aubrey de Mello.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 109 M    i. Alberic I, Count of Dammartin 72 was born about 1110 in <Dammartin, Seine-et-Marne>, France and died in 1183 about age 73.

67. Emme, de Bretagne 74 (Geoffrey, de Bretagne35, Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1026 in Bretagne, France.

Emme married Ivo St. Sauveur,122 son of Nigel de St. Sauveur and Godehilda Borrel, about 1042 in Normandy, France. Ivo was born about 1026 in <Normandy, France>. Another name for Ivo was Ivo de St. Sauveur.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 110 M    i. Sir Nigell FitzIvo, 1st Baron of Halton 123 was born about 1042 in <Cotentin, Normandy, France> and died about 1080 about age 38.

68. Bardolph, Lord of Ravenswath 75 (Eudes, Comté de Bretagne36, Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in Bretagne, (France) and died after 1100 in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/1267.htm :
Background Information. 967
Bardolph, Lord of Ravenswath and other manors in Richamondshire, was a great landowner in Yorkshire, who gave a carucate of land and the churches of Patrick Brampton and Ravenswath in pure alms to the Abbey of St. Mary's at York. In his old age, when weary of the world and its trouble, he became a monk and retired to the Abbey, of which he had been a benefactor. He was succeeded by his son and hair, Akaris, or Acarius Fitz Bardolph.

~ Irish Pedigrees: Or, the Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, p. 104
• Background Information. 780
Eschecol, or Ascough, was granted after 1086 by Alan, earl of Richmond, to Bardolf, his brother, father of Akaris, ancestor of the Barons Fitz Hugh of Ravensworth.

~ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States of America, p. 144

Bardolph married someone.

His child was:

+ 111 M    i. Acarius Fitz Bardolph, of Rafenswad 124 was born in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died in 1161 in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

69. Alice, of Normandy 77 (Richard III, Duke of Normandy37, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1021 in <Normandy, France>. Another name for Alice was Alix de Normandie.

Research Notes: Illegitimate daughter of Richard III.

Alice married Ranulph I, Vicomte of the Bessin,125 son of Anschitil, Vicomte of the Bessin and Unknown,. Ranulph was born about 1017 in <Bayeux, Calvados, Normandy, France>. Another name for Ranulph was Ranulf Count of Bayeux.

Research Notes: Fought at the Battle of Val-es-Dunes in 1047

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132A-24 (Alice of Normandy)


The child from this marriage was:

+ 112 M    i. Ranulph II, Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy 126 was born about 1048 in <Normandy, France> and died after Apr 1089.

70. Guillaume I de Bourgogne 78 (Adelais, de Normandie38, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1040 in <Bourgogne, Champagne>, France and died on 12 Nov 1087 in France about age 47. Another name for Guillaume was William I "the Great" Count Palantine of Burgundy, Count of Mâcon.

Death Notes: FamilySearch has d. 11 Nov 1087

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132-24

Guillaume married Stephanie, de Longwy 127 between 1049 and 1057. Stephanie was born about 1035 in <Longwy, Meurthe-et-Moselle>, France and died after 1088. Other names for Stephanie were Etiennette of Barcelona and Stephanie of Barcelona.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132-24 (William I).

From Line 144-22 (William I): "Stephanie, parentage NN. (Note: Prof. David H. Kelley believes her parentage unproven (2003). De Vajay, in Annales de Bourgogne vol. 32 (1960) 258-261, identifies Stephanie (Etiennette) as dau. of Clemence de Foix & Albert de Longwy, Duke of Lorraine, d. 1048. Clemence is identified as dau. of Bernard I Roger, Comte de Foix, d. 1035, & Garside de Bigorre; & Bernard as son of Roger I de Carcassonne & wife Adelaide. Moriarty, cit., supplies pedigree charts for these families, but does not agree with de Vajay as to her identity. Garnier (table XXVIII) shows her as dau. of Raymond II, Count of Barcelona)."
----
FamilySearch gives her name as Stephanie (Etiennette) of Barcelona, daughter of Raimund Berenger II (III), Count of Barcelona and Mathilda (Maud) d'Apulia.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 113 M    i. Raymond, of Burgundy, Count of Amous 120 was born about 1060 in <Dijon>, France and died on 26 Mar 1107 in Grajal do Campos, Léon, Spain about age 47.

+ 114 F    ii. Ermentrude, of Burgundy 128 was born about 1060 in Burgundy, France and died after 8 Mar 1105.

+ 115 F    iii. Gisele, of Burgundy 129 was born about 1070 in <Bourgogne, Champagne, France> and died after 1133.

+ 116 F    iv. Sibylle, of Burgundy-Ivrea 113 died after 1103.


71. William the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy, King of England 61 (Robert I, Duke of Normandy39, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1028 in Falaise, Normandy, France and died on 9 Sep 1087 in Rouen, Normandy, France about age 59. Other names for William were William of Normandy and William I King of England.

Birth Notes: Wikipedia (William the Conqueror) and thepeerage.com give b. in 1027 or 1028.

William married Matilda, of Flanders,34 daughter of Baldwin V, de Lille, Count of Flanders and Adele Capet, Princess of France, in 1053 in Cathedral de Notre Dame, Normandie, France. Matilda was born about 1032 in Flanders, died on 2 Nov 1083 in Caen, Normandy, France about age 51, and was buried in Abbaye aux Dames, Caen, Normandy, France. Another name for Matilda was Maud of Flanders.

Birth Notes: Ancestral Roots gives both abt. 1031 and 1032.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots gives 1 Nov 1083 and 2 Nov 1083.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Matilda of Flanders :

Matilda of Flanders (c. 1031 - 2 November 1083) was Queen consort of the Kingdom of England and the wife of William I the Conqueror .

She was the daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders , and Adèle (1000-1078/9), daughter of Robert II of France .

At 4'2" (127 cm) tall, Matilda was England's smallest queen, according to the Guinness Book of Records . According to legend, Matilda (or "Maud") told the representative of William, Duke of Normandy (later king of England as William the Conqueror), who had come asking for her hand, that she was far too high-born (being descended from King Alfred the Great of England) to consider marrying a bastard. When that was repeated to him, William rode from Normandy to Bruges , found Matilda on her way to church, dragged her off her horse by her long braids, threw her down in the street in front of her flabbergasted attendants, and then rode off. Another version of the story states that William rode to Matilda's father's house in Lille, threw her to the ground in her room (again, by the braids), and hit her (or violently shook her) before leaving. Naturally Baldwin took offense at this but, before they drew swords, Matilda settled the matter [1] by deciding to marry him, and even a papal ban (on the grounds of consanguinity ) did not dissuade her. They were married in 1053.

There were rumours that Matilda had been in love with the English ambassador to Flanders , a Saxon named Brihtric, who declined her advances. Whatever the truth of the matter, years later when she was acting as Regent for William in England, she used her authority to confiscate Brihtric's lands and throw him into prison, where he died.

When William was preparing to invade England, Matilda outfitted a ship, the Mora, out of her own money and gave it to him. For many years it was thought that she had some involvement in the creation of the Bayeux Tapestry (commonly called La Tapisserie de la Reine Mathilde in French), but historians no longer believe that; it seems to have been commissioned by William's half-brother Odo, Bishop of Bayeux , and made by English artists in Kent .

Matilda bore William eleven children, and he was believed to have been faithful to her, at least up until the time their son Robert rebelled against his father and Matilda sided with Robert against William. After she died, in 1083 at the age of 51, William became tyrannical, and people blamed it on his having lost her. Contrary to the belief that she was buried at St. Stephen's, also called l'Abbaye-aux-Hommes in Caen , Normandy , where William was eventually buried, she is intombed at l'Abbaye aux Dames , which is the Sainte-Trinité church, also in Caen. Of particular interest is the 11th century slab, a sleek black stone decorated with her epitaph, marking her grave at the rear of the church. It is of special note since the grave marker for William was replaced as recently as the beginning of the 19th century. In 1961, their graves were opened and their bones measured, proving their physical statures. [2]

Children
Some doubt exists over how many daughters there were. This list includes some entries which are obscure.
Robert Curthose (c. 1054 - 1134), Duke of Normandy, married Sybil of Conversano , daughter of Geoffrey of Conversano
Adeliza (or Alice) (c. 1055 - ?), reportedly betrothed to Harold II of England (Her existence is in some doubt.)
Cecilia (or Cecily) (c. 1056 - 1126), Abbess of Holy Trinity, Caen
William Rufus (1056 - 1100), King of the English
Richard, Duke of Bernay (1057 - c. 1081), killed by a stag in New Forest
Adela (c. 1062 - 1138), married Stephen, Count of Blois
Agatha (c. 1064 - c. 1080), betrothed to (1) Harold of Wessex , (2) Alfonso VI of Castile
Constance (c. 1066 - 1090), married Alan IV Fergent , Duke of Brittany ; poisoned, possibly by her own servants
Matilda (very obscure, her existence is in some doubt)
Henry Beauclerc (1068-1135), King of England, married (1) Edith of Scotland , daughter of Malcolm III, King of Scotland , (2) Adeliza of Louvain
NOTE:
Gundred
(c. 1063 - 1085), wife of William de Warenne (c. 1055 - 1088), was formerly thought of as being yet another of Matilda's daughters, with speculation that she was William I's full daughter, a stepdaughter, or even a foundling or adopted daughter. However, this connection to William I has now been firmly debunked--see Gundred's discussion page for further information.
Matilda was a seventh generation direct descendent of Alfred the Great . Her marriage to William strengthened his claim to the throne. All sovereigns of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom have been descended from her, as is the present Queen Elizabeth II .


(Duplicate Line. See Person 30)

72. Adelaide, of Normandy, Countess of Aumale 80 (Robert I, Duke of Normandy39, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1030 and died between 1081 and 1090. Other names for Adelaide were Adela of Normandy, Countess of Aumale and Adeliza Countess of Aumale.

Research Notes: Sister of William I the Conqueror, also illegitimate.

Adelaide married Enguerrand II, Count of Ponthieu, son of Hugh II, Count of Pontieu and Bertha, of Aumale,. Enguerrand died in 1053 in Arques.

Death Notes: Slain at Battle of Arques

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 130-24 (Adelaide)


The child from this marriage was:

+ 117 F    i. Judith, of Lens 130 was born in 1054 in <Lens, Artois>, France.

Adelaide next married Lambert, of Boulogne, Count of Lens in Artois. Lambert died in 1054 in Lille, France.

Death Notes: Slain in the Battle of Lille

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 130-24 (Adelaide)

Adelaide next married Eudes, Count of Champagne and Aumale, Earl of Holderness 131 between 1054 and 1056.

73. Fulk V "the Young", Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem 82 (Fulk IV "le Réchin", Count of Anjou40, Ermengarde, of Anjou21, Fulk III "the Black", of Maine, Count of Anjou9, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1092 in Angers, France and died on 10 Nov 1144 in Acre, Palestine at age 52. Other names for Fulk were Fulk of Jerusalem, Fulk V Count of Anjou and King of Jerusalem.

Birth Notes: May have been born in Anjou.

Death Notes: May have died in Jerusalem.

Research Notes: From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871915 :

Count of Anjou; King of Jerusalem (1131-1143). Fulk married the only daughter of Helias, Count of Maine, thereby uniting Anjou and Maine. In 1120 he went on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. In 1128 a delegation from Baldwin II, King of Jerusalem (RIN # 4676), arrived in France, asking Louis VII to choose one of the French nobility to marry his daughter Melisande and become heir to the throne of Jerusalem. Fulk, by then a widower, was chosen. He married Melisande in 1129 and succeeded as King of Jerusalem in 1131. To defend the holy city from the Muslim champion, Zengi, Fulk allied with the emir of Damascus and the emperor of Constantinople during the early 1130's. Turkish raiders took him prisoner in 1137, but then freed him.
!The Plantagenet Chronicles: 19,37-9,46-8,60-1

----
From Wikipedia - Fulk of Jerusalem :

Fulk (1089/1092 in Angers - November 13, 1143 in Acre ), also known as Fulk the Younger, was Count of Anjou (as Fulk V) from 1109 to 1129, and King of Jerusalem from 1131 to his death. He was also the paternal grandfather of Henry II of England .

Count of Anjou
Fulk was born in Angers between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort . In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France .

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. In that year, he married Erembourg of Maine , cementing Angevin control over the County of Maine .

He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France , but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou . Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and became a close friend of the Knights Templar . After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

Crusader and King
By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem . Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter's inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.

However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk's fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffery and left for Jerusalem , where he married Melisende on June 2, 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende's position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III , born in 1130.

Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II's death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende's sister Alice of Antioch , exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.

In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These "natives" focused on Melisende's cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset , count of Jaffa , who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and it did not help matters when Hugh's own stepson accused him of disloyalty. In 1134, in order to expose Hugh, Fulk accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest. Hugh secured himself to Jaffa, and allied himself with the Muslims of Ascalon . He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.

However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen's party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk's supporters "went in terror of their lives" in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk "he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende's) consent". The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.

Securing the borders
Jerusalem's northern border was of great concern. Fulk had been appointed regent of the Principality of Antioch by Baldwin II. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance of Antioch , daughter of Bohemund II and Alice of Antioch , and niece to Melisende. However, the greatest concern during Fulk's reign was the rise of Atabeg Zengi of Mosul .

In 1137 Fulk was defeated in battle near Barin but allied with Mu'in ad-Din Unur , the vizier of Damascus . Damascus was also threatened by Zengi. Fulk captured the fort of Banias , to the north of Lake Tiberias and thus secured the northern frontier.

Fulk also strengthened the kingdom's southern border. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea , and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea , Fulk had Blanche Garde , Ibelin , and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon. This city was a base from which the Egyptian Fatimids launched frequent raids on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Fulk sought to neutralise this threat.

In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the crusader states . John's arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet the emperor in Jerusalem.

Death
In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre , Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle, "and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils", as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.

According to William, Fulk was "a ruddy man, like David... faithful and gentle, affable and kind... an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs." His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk did not adequately attend to the defense of the crusader states to the north. Ibn al-Qalanisi (who calls him al-Kund Anjur, an Arabic rendering of "Count of Anjou") says that "he was not sound in his judgment nor was he successful in his administration." The Zengids continued their march on the crusader states, culminating in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, which led to the Second Crusade (see Siege of Edessa ).

Family
In 1110, Fulk married Ermengarde of Maine (died 1126), the daughter of Elias I of Maine . Their four children were:
Geoffrey V of Anjou , father of Henry II of England .
Sibylla of Anjou (1112-1165, Bethlehem ), married in 1123 William Clito (div. 1124), married in 1134 Thierry, Count of Flanders .
Alice (or Isabella ) (1107-1154, Fontevrault), married William Adelin ; after his death in the White Ship she became a nun and later Abbess of Fontevrault .
Elias II of Maine (died 1151)

His second wife was Melisende , Queen of Jerusalem
Baldwin III of Jerusalem
Amalric I of Jerusalem

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Anjou: 1109-1129.

• King of Jerusalem: 1131-1144.

Fulk married Erembourg, Countess of Maine,132 daughter of Hélie de la Flêche, Count of Maine and Matilda, of Château-du-Loire, in 1110. Erembourg died in 1126. Other names for Erembourg were Eremburg of Maine, Eremburga of La Flêche, Ermengarde of Maine, and Erembourg de la Flêche.

Marriage Notes: May have been married in 1109.

Research Notes: First wife of Fulk V. Only daughter of Helie de la Flêche.

From Wikipedia - Ermengarde of Maine :

Ermengarde or Erembourg of Maine, also known as Erembourg de la Flèche (died 1126 ), was Countess of Maine and the Lady of Château-du-Loir from 1110 to 1126 . She was the daughter of Elias I of Maine , Count of Maine, and Mathilda of Château-du-Loire.

In 1109 she married Fulk V of Anjou , thereby finally bringing Maine under Angevin control. She gave birth to:
Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou (d. 1151 )
Elias II of Maine (d. 1151 )
Matilda of Anjou (d. 1119 ), who married William Adelin , the son and heir to Henry I of England
Sibylla of Anjou (d. 1119 ), married in 1121 to William Clito , and then (after an annulment in 1124) to Thierry, Count of Flanders

She died in 1126 , on either the 15th January or the 12 October. After her death, Fulk left his lands to their son Geoffrey, and set out for the Holy Land , where he married Melisende of Jerusalem and became King of Jerusalem .

Noted events in her life were:

• Countess of Maine: 1110-1126.

• Lady of Château-du-Loire: 1110-1126.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 118 F    i. Sybil, of Anjou 133 was born about 1112 in <Anjou, France> and died in 1165 about age 53.

+ 119 M    ii. Geoffrey V Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy 134 was born on 24 Aug 1113 in Anjou, France, died on 7 Sep 1151 at age 38, and was buried in Le Mans, France.

Fulk next married Melisende de Rethel 135 on 2 Jun 1129. Melisende died on 11 Sep 1161.

Research Notes: Second wife of Fulk V. Eldest daughter of Baldwin II, Count of Rethel.

74. William III, Count of Angoulême 85 (Foulques "Taillefer", Comté d'Angoulême41, Geoffroy d'Angoulême22, Gerberge, d'Anjou10, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1084, died in 1120 in Deutz about age 36, and was buried in 1120 in Deutz St. Heribert. Another name for William was Guillaume d'Angoulême.

Death Notes: May have died in 1118.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - William III, Count of Angoulême :

William III of Angoulême was the twelfth count of Angoulême .
William III was a fifth generation descendant of Count Arnold I . He was born in 1084, the son of Count Fulk of Angoulême and the grandson of Geoffrey of Angoulême and Petronille De Archiac . William III's reign lasted from 1089 until 1118. In 1108 he married Vitapoy De Benauges . Their son, Wulgrin II of Angoulême , was born in 1108 and succeeded William III as the thirteenth count of Angoulême .

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Angoulême: 1089-1118.

William married Vitapoi, de Bezaume,136 daughter of Guillaume Amanieu, Vicomté de Bezaume and Unknown, in 1108. Another name for Vitapoi was Vitapoy de Benauges.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/4377.htm :
Web Reference: Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands, Vitapoi de Bezuaume .
Vitapoi's married to Guillaume V, comté d'Angoulême is recorded in the Historia Pontificum et Comitum Engolismensis which states "filia Amani seu Amaniei Gasconis . . . Vitapoi"


The child from this marriage was:

+ 120 M    i. Vulgrin II, Comté d'Angoulême 137 was born about 1108 in Angoulême, died on 16 Sep 1140 in Château de Bounteville, (France) about age 32, and was buried in Saint-Eparchius.

75. Sir Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester and Count of Meulan 86 (Adeline, of Meulan42, Waleran I, Count of Meulan23, Alix de Vexin11, Gauthier II Vexin, Count of Vexin6, Adèle, d'Anjou3, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1049 in Pont-Audemer, Beaumont, Normandy, France, died on 5 Jun 1118 in Leicestershire, England about age 69, and was buried in Preaux, Normandy, France. Another name for Robert was Robert de Meulan.

Research Notes: First husband of Isabel de Vermandois.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), Line 50-24 (Isabel de Vermandois) has "b. abt 1049, d. 5 Jun 1118, Lord of Beaumont, Pont-Audemer and Brionne, Count of Meulan, cr. 1st Earl of Leicester, Companion of William the Conqueror at Hastings 1066, son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline (or Adelise), dau. of Waleran, Count of Meulan..."

From Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester and Count of Meulan (1049 - June 5 , 1118 ) was a powerful English and French nobleman, revered as one of the wisest men of his age. Chroniclers speak highly of his eloquence, his learning, and three kings of England valued his counsel.
He accompanied William the Conqueror to England in 1066 , where his service earned him more than 91 lordships and manors. When his mother died in 1081 , Robert inherited the title of Count of Meulan in Normandy , also the title of Viscount Ivry and Lord of Norton. He did homage to Philip I of France for these estates and sat as French Peer in the Parliament held at Poissy .

At the Battle of Hastings Robert was appointed leader of the infantry on the right wing of the army.

He and his brother Henry were members of the Royal hunting party in the New Forest , when William Rufus received his mysterious death wound, 2 August 1100 . He then pledged alligience to William Rufus' brother, Henry I of England , who created him Earl of Leicester in 1107.

On the death of William Rufus, William, Count of Evreux and Ralph de Conches made an incursion into Robert's Norman estates, on the pretence that they had suffered injury through some advice that Robert had given to the King; their raid was very successful for they collected a vast booty.
According to Henry of Huntingdon , Robert died of shame after "a certain earl carried off the lady he had espoused, either by some intrigue or by force and stratagem." His wife Isabella remarried in 1118 to William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey .


Family and children
He was the eldest son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan , daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan , and an older brother of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick .

In 1096 he married (Isabel) Elizabeth de Vermandois , daughter of Hugh Magnus and a scion of the French royal family. Their children were:
Emma de Beaumont (born 1102 )
Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (born 1104 )
Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan (born 1104 )
Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (born c. 1106 )
Adeline de Beaumont, married two times:
Hugh IV of Montfort-sur-Risle ;
Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)
Aubree de Beaumont, married Hugh II of Château-neuf-Thimerais.
Maud de Beaumont, married William Lovel. (b. c. 1102)
Isabel de Beaumont, a mistress of King Henry I of England . Married two times:
Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke ;
Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland

Sources
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 50-24, 50-25, 53-24, 53-25, 66-25, 114-29, 140-24, 184-4, 215-24, 215-25
Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.

Robert married Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester,58 daughter of Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France and Adelaide de Vermandois, Countess of Vermandois and Valois, between 1096 and 1101. The marriage ended in divorce. Isabel was born about 1081 in <Valois, Île-de-France, France>, died on 13 Feb 1131 in England about age 50, and was buried in Lewes, Sussex, England. Other names for Isabel were Elizabeth de Vermandois, Isabella de Vermandois, and Isabel de Vermandois.

Marriage Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 53-24 has m. 1096. Wikipedia has m. abt. 1101.

Noted events in their marriage were:

• Betrothal: to Robert de Meulan, 1096.

Birth Notes: FamilySearch has b. abt 1085 in Valois, France

Research Notes: From: Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

Elizabeth de Vermandois, or Elisabeth or Isabel de Vermandois (c. 1081 -13 February 1131 ), is a fascinating figure about whose descendants and ancestry much is known and about whose character and life relatively little is known. She was twice married to influential Anglo-Norman magnates, and had several children (among whose descendants are numbered many kings and some queens of England and Scotland). Her Capetian and Carolingian ancestry was a source of much pride for some of these descendants (who included these arms as quarterings in their coats-of-arms[1] ). However, the lady herself led a somewhat controversial life.

Family
Elizabeth de Vermandois was the third daughter of Hugh Magnus and Adele of Vermandois. Her paternal grandparents were Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev . Her maternal grandparents were Herbert IV of Vermandois and Adele of Vexin .
Her mother was the heiress of the county of Vermandois, and descendant of a junior patrilineal line of descent from Charlemagne . The first Count of Vermandois was Pepin of Vermandois . He was a son of Bernard of Italy , grandson of Pippin of Italy and great-grandson of Charlemagne and Hildegard .

As such, Elizabeth had distinguished ancestry and connections. Her father was a younger brother of Philip I of France and her mother was among the last Carolingians . She was also distantly related to the Kings of England , the Dukes of Normandy , the Counts of Flanders and through her Carolingian ancestors to practically every major nobleman in Western Europe .

Countess of Leicester
In 1096, while under age (and probably aged 9 or 11), Elizabeth married Robert de Meulan, 1st Earl of Leicester . Meulan was over 35 years her senior, which was an unusual age difference even for this time period. He was a nobleman of some significance in France, having inherited lands from his maternal uncle Henry, Count of Meulan, and had fought bravely and with distinction at his first battle, the Battle of Hastings in 1066 then aged only 16. His parents Roger de Beaumont , Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemar and Adeline of Meulan , heiress of Meulan had died long before; Roger had been a kinsman and close associate of William the Conqueror . Meulan had inherited lands in Normandy after his father died circa 1089, and had also been given lands in the Kingdom of England after his participation in the Norman conquest of England . However, at the time of the marriage, he held no earldom in England while his younger brother was already styled Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick .

Planche states that the bride (Elizabeth) agreed willingly to the marriage, although this means little in the context. Despite the immense age difference, this was a good marriage for its times. Meulan was a respected advisor to three reigning monarchs: William II of England ), Robert Curthose of Normandy and Philip I of France .

According to Middle Ages custom, brides were often betrothed young - 8 being the legal age for betrothal and 12 for marriage (for women). The young betrothed wife would often go to her husband's castle to be raised by his parents or other relatives and to learn the customs and ways of her husband's family. The actual wedding would not take place until much later. Some genealogists speculate that the usual age at which a noble bride could expect the marriage to be consummated would be 14. This is consistent with the date of birth of Elizabeth's first child Emma in 1102 when she would be about 15 to 17.

The marriage produced several children, including most notably two sons who were twins (born 1104 ), and thus remarkable in both surviving and both becoming important noblemen. They are better known to historians of this period as the Beaumont twins, or as Waleran de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and his younger twin Robert Bossu (the Humpback) or Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester . (Readers of Ellis Peters' Cadfael historical mystery series will find both twins mentioned frequently).

Another notable child of this marriage was Elisabeth or Isabel de Beaumont, one of the youngest mistresses of Henry I of England and later mother (by her first marriage) of Richard Strongbow .

Some contemporaries were surprised that the aging Count of Meulan (b circa 1049/1050) was able to father so many children, given how busy he was with turmoil in England and Normandy from 1102 to 1110 (or later) and acting as Henry I's unofficial minister. One explanation is offered below; another might simply be an indication of his good health and energy (expended mostly in dashing from one troublespot in Normandy to England back to Normandy).

William II of England died suddenly in a purported hunting accident, and was hastily succeeded not by the expected heir but by the youngest brother Henry . This seizure of the throne led to an abortive invasion by the older brother Duke Robert of Normandy, followed by an uneasy truce between the brothers, followed by trouble in both England and Normandy for some time (stirred up by Duke Robert, and by an exiled nobleman Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury ). Finally, Henry invaded Normandy and in the Battle of Tinchebray (September 28 , 1106 ) destroyed organized opposition to his takeover of Normandy and imprisoned his ineffectual older brother for his lifetime. Meulan and his brother Warwick were apparently supporters of Henry during this entire period, and Meulan was rewarded with the earldom of Leicester in 1103 . By 1107, Meulan was in possession of substantial lands in three domains. In 1111, he was able to revenge himself on the attack on his seat Meulan by Louis VI of France . He avenged himself by harrying Paris .

Countess of Surrey
Elizabeth, Countess of Meulan apparently tired of her aging husband at some point during the marriage. The historian Planche says (1874) that the Countess was seduced by or fell in love with a younger nobleman, William de Warenne (c. 1071 -11 May 1138 ) himself the thwarted suitor of Edith of Scotland , Queen consort of Henry I of England. Warenne, whose mother Gundred has been alleged (in modern times) to be the Conqueror's daughter and stepdaughter by some genealogists, was said to want a royal bride, and Elizabeth fitted his requirements, even though she was also another man's wife.

In 1115, the Countess was apparently carried off or abducted by Warenne, which abduction apparently concealed a long-standing affair. There was some kind of separation or divorce between Meulan and his wife, which however did not permit her to marry her lover. The elderly Count of Meulan died, supposedly of chagrin and mortification in being thus publicly humiliated, in the Abbey of Preaux, Normandy on 5 June 1118 , leaving his properties to his two elder sons whom he had carefully educated.

Elizabeth married, secondly, William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey , sometime after the death of her first husband. By him, it is alleged, she already had several children (all born during her marriage to Meulan). She also had at least one daughter born while she was living out of wedlock with Warenne (1115-1118). It is unclear whether this daughter was Ada de Warenne, wife of Henry of Scotland or Gundrede de Warenne, wife of Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick (her half-brothers' first cousin).

The later life of Elizabeth de Vermandois is not known. Her sons by her first marriage appear to have a good relationship with their half-brother William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey although on opposing sides for much of the wars between Stephen and Matilda . Her eldest son Waleran, Count of Meulan was active in supporting the disinherited heir William Clito , son of Robert Curthose until captured by King Henry. He was not released until Clito's death without issue in 1128. Her second son Robert inherited his father's English estates and the earldom of Leicester and married the heiress of the Fitzosbern counts of Breteuil. Her daughter Isabel however became a king's concubine or mistress at a young age; it is unclear whether her mother's own life or her eldest brother's political and personal travails in this period played any part in this decision. Before her mother died, Isabel had become wife of Gilbert de Clare , later (1147) Earl of Pembroke, so had adopted a more conventional life like her mother.

There are no known biographies of Elizabeth de Vermandois, nor any known fictional treatments of her life.

Children and descendants
During her first marriage (1096-1115) to Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan (d 5 June 1118), Elizabeth had 3 sons (including twin elder sons) and 6 daughters:
Emma de Beaumont (born 1102 ) whose fate is unknown. She was betrothed as an infant to Aumari, nephew of William, Count of Evreux, but the marriage never took place. She probably died young, or entered a convent.[2]
Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan (born 1104 ) married and left issue.
Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (born 1104 ) married and left issue (his granddaughter Hawisa or Isabella of Gloucester was the unfortunate first wife of King John .
Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (born c. 1106 ) lost his earldom, left issue
Adeline de Beaumont (b ca 1107), married two times:
Hugh IV, 4th Lord of Montfort-sur-Risle to whom she was married firstly by her brother Waleran;
Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)
Aubree (or Alberee) de Beaumont (b ca 1109), married by her brother Waleran to Hugh II of Châteauneuf-en-Thimerais (possibly son of Hugh I of Châteauneuf-en-Thimerais and his wife Mabille de Montgomerie, 2nd daughter of Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury )
Maud de Beaumont (b ca 1111), married by her brother Waleran to William Lovel, or Louvel or Lupel, son of Ascelin Goel, Lord of Ivri.
Isabel de Beaumont (b Aft. 1102), a mistress of King Henry I of England . Married two times:
Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke by whom she was mother of Richard Strongbow , who invaded Ireland 1170 ;
Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland (this marriage is not conclusively proven)
In her second marriage, to William de Warenne, Elizabeth had three sons and two daughters (for a total of fourteen children - nine during her first marriage, and five during her second):
William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne (b. 1119 dspm 1147) whose daughter Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey married 1stly
William, Count of Boulogne (dsp), yr son of King Stephen, and married 2ndly
Hamelin Plantagenet , an illegitimate half-brother of King Henry II of England by whom she had issue, later earls of Surrey and Warenne.
Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy. He married Adeline, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William, whose daughter and sole heir Beatrice married first Dodo, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh;
Ralph de Warenne (dsp)
Gundrada de Warenne , (Gundred) who married first
Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick and had issue; second (as his 2nd wife)
William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Warenne and Surrey and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle; and they had issue.

Ada de Warenne (d. ca. 1178 ), who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon , younger son of King David I of Scotland , Earl of Huntingdon by his marriage to the heiress Matilda or Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon (herself great-niece of William I of England ) and had issue. They were parents to Malcolm IV of Scotland and William I of Scotland and their youngest son became David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon . All Kings of Scotland since 1292 were the descendants of Huntingdon.

The second earl had married Isabella, daughter of Hugh, Count of Vermandois, widow of Robert de Beaumont, earl of Leicester. The arms of Warenne "checky or and azure" were adopted from the Vermandois coat after this marriage.

The original Vermandois arms were "checky or and sable" but there was no black tincture in early medieval heraldry until sable was discovered, being the crushed fur of this animal. A very deep indigo was used instead which faded into blue so the Vermandois arms becams "checky argent and or".
The Vermandois arms were inherited by the earls of Warenne and Surrey, the Newburgh earls of Warwick, the Beauchamp earls of Warwick and Worcester and the Clifford earls of Cumberland.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 45)

76. Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick 87 (Adeline, of Meulan42, Waleran I, Count of Meulan23, Alix de Vexin11, Gauthier II Vexin, Count of Vexin6, Adèle, d'Anjou3, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1046, died on 20 Jun 1123 about age 77, and was buried in Preaux Abbey, Preaux, Normandy, France. Other names for Henry were Henry de Newburgh and Henry de Neubourg.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots has d. 1119 (Line 151-24, Margaret de Perche); Wikipedia has d. 20 Jun 1123.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick :

Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick (? - 20 June 1123 ) was a Norman nobleman. He is also known as Henry de Neubourg or Henry de Newburgh, from the castle of Newburg near Louviers , in Normandy where he was born.

Henry was the younger son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan , daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan . He inherited the modest lordship of La Neubourg, in central Normandy, but acquired a much greater holding in England, when, in reward for help in suppressing the Rebellion of 1088 , William II of England made him Earl of Warwick .

His name is included in the roll of the knights who came over with the William the Conqueror , but he does not appear to have been present at the Battle of Hastings . He spent the greater part of his life in Normandy , his name is not found in the Domesday Book . He took a leading role in reconciling the Conqueror with his eldest son Robert Curthose in 1081 and he stood high in the Conqueror's favour. He was the companion and friend of Henry I , and when in 1100 a division took place amongst the barons who had gathered together to choose a successor to William II, it was mainly owing to his advice that Henry was selected and when in the following year most of the barons were openly or secretly disloyal and favoured the attempt of Duke Robert to gain the Crown, he and his brother were amongst the few that remained faithful to the King.

He had many honours conferred upon him, in 1068 he was made Constable of Warwick Castle and shortly afterwards King William gave it to him together with the borough and manor. The Castle was enlarged and strengthened during the long succession of powerful lords, and it eventually became one of the most renowned of English fortresses and it remains even to-day the glory of the midland shires. The Bear and Ragged Staff was the badge of Guy the great opponent of the Danes, and Henry on his elevation to the Earldom in 1076 by William I, assumed it, and it has ever since been used by successive Earls. Odericus tells us that "he earned this honour by his valour and loyalty" and Wace speaks of him as "a brave man". He was made a Councillor by the King in 1079 and a Baron of the Exchequer in Normandy 12 April 1080 .

In 1099 he fought against the Welsh and built a castle at Abertawy , near Swansea , which was unsuccessfully attacked by the Welsh in 1113 ; he also captured the Gower Peninsula in the south of Glamorganshire . He built other castles at Penrhys , Llandhidian and Swansea in ll20 , together with the others at Oystermouth and Aberllychor , the only remains of the latter are a mound and a keep.

Some time between 1106 and 1116 he was granted the lordship of Gower in Wales .

Henry was by disposition quiet and retiring, and was overshadowed by his elder brother Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester , reputedly one of the most brilliant men in England.

He died 20 June 1123 and was buried in the Abbey at Preaux .

Family and children
He married before 1100 Marguerite, daughter of Geoffrey II of Perche and Beatrix of Montdidier , and had children:
Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick , who succeeded him as earl;
Henry de Neubourg, probably inherited Dorset and Devon estates.
Robert de Neubourg , who inherited Henry's Norman lands, and was Chief Justiciar of Normandy;
Rotrou (died 27 November 1183 ), who was Bishop of Évreux and then Archbishop of Rouen , and who was Chief Justiciar and Steward of Normandy.
Geoffroy.

Noted events in his life were:

• 1st Earl of Warwick: 1090.

• Granted: Lordship of Gower in Wales, 1107.

Henry married Margaret de Perche,138 daughter of Geoffroy II, Count of Mortagne, 1st Count de Perche and Béatrix de Mondidier, before 1100. Margaret died after 1156. Another name for Margaret was Marguerite de Perche.

Noted events in her life were:

• Living: 1156.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 121 M    i. Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick 139 was born about 1102 and died on 12 Jun 1153 about age 51.

77. William de Beaumont (Adeline, of Meulan42, Waleran I, Count of Meulan23, Alix de Vexin11, Gauthier II Vexin, Count of Vexin6, Adèle, d'Anjou3, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Roger de Beaumont

78. Alberee de Beaumont, Abess of Eton (Adeline, of Meulan42, Waleran I, Count of Meulan23, Alix de Vexin11, Gauthier II Vexin, Count of Vexin6, Adèle, d'Anjou3, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Roger de Beaumont


previous  Eighth Generation  Next



79. Ermengarde, de Nevers 89 (Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre44, William I, Count of Nevers24, Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1073 in <Courtenay, Loiret>, France and died in 1095 in France about age 22.

Ermengarde married Milo, Sire de Courtenay,140 son of Jocelin de Courtenay and Isabel de Montlhéry, about 1095 in France. Milo was born about 1075 in <Courtenay, Loiret>, France, died after 1127, and was buried in Abbey of Fontain Jean, France. Other names for Milo were Miles Sire de Courtenay, Miles de Courtenay, and Milo de Courtenay.

Birth Notes: FamilySearch has b. abt 1069


The child from this marriage was:

+ 122 M    i. Renaud de Courtenay, Sire de Courtenay 141 was born about 1125 in <Courtenay, Loiret>, France and died about 1190 about age 65.

80. Isabel de Beaumont 91 (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born between 1100 and 1107 and died after 1172. Another name for Isabel was Isabella of Meulan.

Research Notes: From thepeerage.com:
Isabella of Meulan was born between 1102 and 1107.1 She was the daughter of Robert de Meulan, 1st Earl of Leicester and Elizabeth de Vermandois.2 She married Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke, son of Gilbert fitz Richard and Adeliza de Clermont . She died after 1172.2
As a result of her marriage, Isabella of Meulan was styled as Countess of Pembroke.
-----------

From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

Isabel de Beaumont (b Aft. 1102), a mistress of King Henry I of England . Married two times:
Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke by whom she was mother of Richard Strongbow , who invaded Ireland 1170 ;
Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland (this marriage is not conclusively proven)

Isabel married Gilbert FitzGilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke,142 son of Gilbert FitzRichard, de Clare and Adelaide de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis,. Gilbert was born about 1100 and died on 6 Jan 1148 about age 48. Another name for Gilbert was Gilbert de Clare 1st Earl of Pembroke.

Research Notes: From thepeerage.com:
Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke also went by the nick-name of Gilbert 'Strongbow'. He was also known as Gilbert FitzGilbert.2 He was created 1st Earl of Pembroke [England] circa 1138.

81. Emma de Beaumont (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1102.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :
Emma de Beaumont (born 1102 ) whose fate is unknown. She was betrothed as an infant to Aumari, nephew of William, Count of Evreux, but the marriage never took place. She probably died young, or entered a convent.[2]

82. Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester 92 (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1104 in <Leicester>, Leicestershire, England, died on 5 Apr 1168 in England at age 64, and was buried in Leicester Abbey, Leicester, Leicestershire, England. Another name for Robert was Robert "Bossu" de Beaumont 2nd Earl of Leicester.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois -
Younger twin of Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan. Nicknamed Robert Bossu (the Humpback).

From Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester :

Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (1104 - 5 April 1168 ) was Justiciar of England 1155-1168.
The surname "de Beaumont" is given him by genealogists. The only known contemporary surname applied to him is "Robert son of Count Robert". Henry Knighton, the fourteenth-century chronicler notes him as Robert "Le Bossu" (meaning "Robert the Hunchback" in French ).

Early Life and Education
Robert was an English nobleman of Norman-French ancestry. He was the son of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and 1st Earl of Leicester and Elizabeth de Vermandois . He was the twin brother of Waleran de Beaumont . There is no knowing whether they were identical or fraternal twins, but the fact that they are remarked on by contemporaries as twins indicates that they probably were in fact identical.

The two brothers, Robert and Waleran, were adopted into the royal household shortly after their father's death in June 1118 (upon which Robert inherited his father's second titles of Earl of Leicester). Their lands on either side of the Channel were committed to a group of guardians, led by their stepfather, William earl of Warenne or Surrey . They accompanied King Henry I to Normandy , to meet with Pope Callixtus II in 1119 , when the king incited them to debate philosophy with the cardinals . Both twins were literate, and Abingdon Abbey later claimed to have been Robert's school, but though this is possible, its account is not entirely trustworthy. A surviving treatise on astronomy (British Library ms Royal E xxv) carries a dedication "to Earl Robert of Leicester, that man of affairs and profound learning, most accomplished in matters of law" who can only be this Robert. On his death he left his own psalter to the abbey he founded at Leicester, which was still in its library in the late fifteenth century. The existence of this indicates that like many noblemen of his day, Robert followed the canonical hours in his chapel.

Career at the Norman Court
In 1120 Robert was declared of age and inherited most of his father's lands in England, while his twin brother took the French lands. However in 1121 , royal favour brought Robert the great Norman honors of Breteuil and Pacy-sur-Eure , with his marriage to Amice de Montfort , daughter of a Breton intruder the king had forced on the honor after the forfeiture of the Breteuil family in 1119 . Robert spent a good deal of his time and resources over the next decade integrating the troublesome and independent barons of Breteuil into the greater complex of his estates. He did not join in his brother's great Norman rebellion against King Henry I in 1123 -. He appears fitfully at the royal court despite his brother's imprisonment until 1129 . Thereafter the twins were frequently to be found together at Henry I's court.

Robert held lands throughout the country. In the 1120s and 1130s he tried to rationalise his estates in Leicestershire. Leicestershire estates of the See of Lincoln and the Earl of Chester were seized by force. This enhanced the integrity of Robert's block of estates in the central midlands, bounded by Nuneaton , Loughborough , Melton Mowbray and Market Harborough .

In 1135 , the twins were present at King Henry's deathbed. Robert's actions in the succession period are unknown, but he clearly supported his brother's decision to join the court of the new king Stephen before Easter 1136 . During the first two years of the reign Robert is found in Normandy fighting rival claimants for his honor of Breteuil. Military action allowed him to add the castle of Pont St-Pierre to his Norman estates in June 1136 at the expense of one of his rivals. From the end of 1137 Robert and his brother were increasingly caught up in the politics of the court of King Stephen in England, where Waleran secured an ascendancy which lasted till the beginning of 1141. Robert participated in his brother's political coup against the king's justiciar, Roger of Salisbury (the Bishop of Salisbury ).

...
Family and children
He married after 1120 Amice de Montfort , daughter of Ralph, senior of Gael or Montfort . They had four children:
Hawise, who married William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester ;
Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester ;
Isabel, who married with:
Simon II of St Liz, 4th Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton ;
Gervase Paynel of Dudley.
Margaret, who married Ralph V de Toeni

Literary references
He is a minor character in The Holy Thief, one of the Brother Cadfael series by Ellis Peters .

Notes
^ a b c Powicke Handbook of British Chronology p. 69

References
D. Crouch, The Beaumont Twins: the Roots and Branches of Power in the Twelfth Century (Cambridge, 1986).
D. Crouch, The Reign of King Stephen, 1135-1154 (London, 2000).
E. King, "Mountsorrel and its region in King Stephen's Reign", Huntington Library Quarterly, 44 (1980), 1-10.
Leicester Abbey, ed. J. Storey, J. Bourne and R. Buckley (Leicester, 2006).
Powicke, F. Maurice and E. B. Fryde Handbook of British Chronology 2nd. ed. London:Royal Historical Society 1961
British Library ms Royal E xxv.

Noted events in his life were:

• Knighted: 1122.

• Justiciar of England: 1155-1168.

Robert married Amice de Gael de Montfort,143 daughter of Ralph de Gael de Montfort and Unknown, after 1120. Amice was born about 1108 and died 31 Aug 1168 or 1169 about age 60. Other names for Amice were Amice de Gael, Amicia, and Amice de Montfort.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 123 M    i. Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester 144 was born about 1121 in Beaumont, France and died on 31 Aug 1190 in Durazzo, West Albania about age 69.

+ 124 F    ii. Hawise de Beaumont, of Leicester died on 24 Apr 1197.

+ 125 F    iii. Isabel de Beaumont .

+ 126 F    iv. Margaret de Beaumont .

83. Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan 93 (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1104 in <Meulan, Île-de-France>, France, died on 10 Apr 1166 in Preaux Abbey, Preaux, Normandy, France at age 62, and was buried in Preaux Abbey, Preaux, Normandy, France.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois
Younger twin. Twin brother was Robert de Beaumont (aka Robert Bossu).

Waleran married Agnes de Montfort,145 daughter of Amaury de Montfort and Agnes de Garlende, about 1141 in Normandy, France. Agnes was born about 1123 in <Montfort-de-Risle, Eure>, France and died on 15 Dec 1181 about age 58. Another name for Agnes was Elizabeth de Montfort.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 127 M    i. Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan 145 was born about 1140 in Meulan, Normandy, France and died in Oct 1207 in Palestine about age 67.

84. Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1106.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois

85. Adeline de Beaumont 94 (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1107.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

Adeline de Beaumont (b ca 1107), married two times:
Hugh IV, 4th Lord of Montfort-sur-Risle to whom she was married firstly by her brother Waleran;
Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)

86. Aubree de Beaumont 94 (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1109.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

Aubree (or Alberee) de Beaumont (b ca 1109), married by her brother Waleran to Hugh II of Châteauneuf-en-Thimerais (possibly son of Hugh I of Châteauneuf-en-Thimerais and his wife Mabille de Montgomerie, 2nd daughter of Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury )

87. Maud de Beaumont (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1111.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

Maud de Beaumont (b ca 1111), married by her brother Waleran to William Lovel, or Louvel or Lupel, son of Ascelin Goel, Lord of Ivri.

88. Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester 92 (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1104 in <Leicester>, Leicestershire, England, died on 5 Apr 1168 in England at age 64, and was buried in Leicester Abbey, Leicester, Leicestershire, England. Another name for Robert was Robert "Bossu" de Beaumont 2nd Earl of Leicester.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois -
Younger twin of Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan. Nicknamed Robert Bossu (the Humpback).

From Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester :

Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (1104 - 5 April 1168 ) was Justiciar of England 1155-1168.
The surname "de Beaumont" is given him by genealogists. The only known contemporary surname applied to him is "Robert son of Count Robert". Henry Knighton, the fourteenth-century chronicler notes him as Robert "Le Bossu" (meaning "Robert the Hunchback" in French ).

Early Life and Education
Robert was an English nobleman of Norman-French ancestry. He was the son of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and 1st Earl of Leicester and Elizabeth de Vermandois . He was the twin brother of Waleran de Beaumont . There is no knowing whether they were identical or fraternal twins, but the fact that they are remarked on by contemporaries as twins indicates that they probably were in fact identical.

The two brothers, Robert and Waleran, were adopted into the royal household shortly after their father's death in June 1118 (upon which Robert inherited his father's second titles of Earl of Leicester). Their lands on either side of the Channel were committed to a group of guardians, led by their stepfather, William earl of Warenne or Surrey . They accompanied King Henry I to Normandy , to meet with Pope Callixtus II in 1119 , when the king incited them to debate philosophy with the cardinals . Both twins were literate, and Abingdon Abbey later claimed to have been Robert's school, but though this is possible, its account is not entirely trustworthy. A surviving treatise on astronomy (British Library ms Royal E xxv) carries a dedication "to Earl Robert of Leicester, that man of affairs and profound learning, most accomplished in matters of law" who can only be this Robert. On his death he left his own psalter to the abbey he founded at Leicester, which was still in its library in the late fifteenth century. The existence of this indicates that like many noblemen of his day, Robert followed the canonical hours in his chapel.

Career at the Norman Court
In 1120 Robert was declared of age and inherited most of his father's lands in England, while his twin brother took the French lands. However in 1121 , royal favour brought Robert the great Norman honors of Breteuil and Pacy-sur-Eure , with his marriage to Amice de Montfort , daughter of a Breton intruder the king had forced on the honor after the forfeiture of the Breteuil family in 1119 . Robert spent a good deal of his time and resources over the next decade integrating the troublesome and independent barons of Breteuil into the greater complex of his estates. He did not join in his brother's great Norman rebellion against King Henry I in 1123 -. He appears fitfully at the royal court despite his brother's imprisonment until 1129 . Thereafter the twins were frequently to be found together at Henry I's court.

Robert held lands throughout the country. In the 1120s and 1130s he tried to rationalise his estates in Leicestershire. Leicestershire estates of the See of Lincoln and the Earl of Chester were seized by force. This enhanced the integrity of Robert's block of estates in the central midlands, bounded by Nuneaton , Loughborough , Melton Mowbray and Market Harborough .

In 1135 , the twins were present at King Henry's deathbed. Robert's actions in the succession period are unknown, but he clearly supported his brother's decision to join the court of the new king Stephen before Easter 1136 . During the first two years of the reign Robert is found in Normandy fighting rival claimants for his honor of Breteuil. Military action allowed him to add the castle of Pont St-Pierre to his Norman estates in June 1136 at the expense of one of his rivals. From the end of 1137 Robert and his brother were increasingly caught up in the politics of the court of King Stephen in England, where Waleran secured an ascendancy which lasted till the beginning of 1141. Robert participated in his brother's political coup against the king's justiciar, Roger of Salisbury (the Bishop of Salisbury ).

...
Family and children
He married after 1120 Amice de Montfort , daughter of Ralph, senior of Gael or Montfort . They had four children:
Hawise, who married William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester ;
Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester ;
Isabel, who married with:
Simon II of St Liz, 4th Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton ;
Gervase Paynel of Dudley.
Margaret, who married Ralph V de Toeni

Literary references
He is a minor character in The Holy Thief, one of the Brother Cadfael series by Ellis Peters .

Notes
^ a b c Powicke Handbook of British Chronology p. 69

References
D. Crouch, The Beaumont Twins: the Roots and Branches of Power in the Twelfth Century (Cambridge, 1986).
D. Crouch, The Reign of King Stephen, 1135-1154 (London, 2000).
E. King, "Mountsorrel and its region in King Stephen's Reign", Huntington Library Quarterly, 44 (1980), 1-10.
Leicester Abbey, ed. J. Storey, J. Bourne and R. Buckley (Leicester, 2006).
Powicke, F. Maurice and E. B. Fryde Handbook of British Chronology 2nd. ed. London:Royal Historical Society 1961
British Library ms Royal E xxv.

Noted events in his life were:

• Knighted: 1122.

• Justiciar of England: 1155-1168.

Robert married Amice de Gael de Montfort,143 daughter of Ralph de Gael de Montfort and Unknown, after 1120. Amice was born about 1108 and died 31 Aug 1168 or 1169 about age 60. Other names for Amice were Amice de Gael, Amicia, and Amice de Montfort.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 82)

89. Gundred de Warenne 96 (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1117 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, died after 1167 in Warwickshire, England, and was buried in Kelso, Roxburgh, Scotland. Another name for Gundred was Gundrada de Warenne.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey:

Gundrada de Warenne , who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick , and second William, lord of Kendal , and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen 's garrison from Warwick Castle ;
---
From http://cybergata.com/roots/3164.htm :
Family. 157
William de Warren, earl of surrey was born about 1017. He married, Isabel or Elizabeth Vermandois, One of their children was named Gundred or Gundreda, who married, first Roger, earl of Warrick, and then to William Fitz Gilbert, who assumed the name "of Lancaster." Gundreda and William Fitz Gilbert had a son named William de Lancaster.

~A Genealogy of the Southworths (Southards)..., pg. 431-432
• Background Information. 747
The second husband of Gundreda, Countess of Warwick, was William, surnamed Lancaster, Baron of Kendal. She was the daughter of William de Warrene, the second Earl of Surrey, by Isabel de Vermandois and consequently, granddaughter to Gundreda, the fifth daughter of William, Duke of Normandy.

~Observations on the Parentage of Gundreda, p. 321
• Background Information. 141
Roger
, Earl of Warwick, married Gundred, elder daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, by Isabel/Elizabeth, widow of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan & 1st Earl of Leicester, daughter of Hugh de Crépy, Count of Vermandos. Roger died in 1153. His widow, Gundred, married, as his 2nd wife, William de Lancaster, Lord of Kendal. Gundred was living in 1166.

~ Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, Vol. XIIB, (Warwick), p. 362

Noted events in her life were:

• Living: 1166.

Gundred married Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick,139 son of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick and Margaret de Perche, before 1130. Roger was born about 1102 and died on 12 Jun 1153 about age 51.

Research Notes: Elder son of Henry de Beaumont.

From Wikipedia - Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick :

Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick (1102 - 12 June 1153 ), was the elder son of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick and Marguerite, daughter of Geoffrey II of Perche and Beatrix of Montdidier . He was also known as Roger de Newburg.

He was generally considered to have been a devout and pious man; a chronicle of the period, the Gesta Regis Stephani , speaks of him as a "man of gentle disposition". The borough of Warwick remembers him as the founder of the Hospital of S. Michael for lepers which he endowed with the tithes of Wedgnock , and other property; he also endowed the House of the Templars beyond the bridge. In the reign of Stephen he founded a priory dedicated to S. Kenned at Llangennilth, Co. Glamorgan and he attached it as a cell to the Abbey of S. Taurinus at Evreux in Normandy .


Family and children
He married 1130 Gundred de Warenne, daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois and had children:
William de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Warwick .
Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick (1153 - 12 December 1204).
Henry de Beaumont, was Dean of Salisbury in 1205.
Agnes de Beaumont, married Geoffrey de Clinton, Chamberlain to the King and son of Geoffrey de Clinton , the founder of Kenilworth Castle and Priory.
Margaret de Beaumont.
Gundred de Beaumont (c.1135-1200), married:
Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk ;
Roger de Glanville.

Noted events in his life were:

• Crusader:

The child from this marriage was:

+ 128 M    i. Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick 146 was born before 1153 and died on 24 Dec 1204.

Gundred next married William I de Lancaster, 5th Baron of Kendal of Workington,147 son of Gilbert de Lancaster and Godith, after 1153. William was born about 1100 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England and died in 1170 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England about age 70. Another name for William was William de Lancaster.

Birth Notes: May have been born in Kendal, Westmoreland, England.

Research Notes: Name of his first wife is unknown. His second wife was Gundred de Warenne, widow of Roger de Beaumont.
---
From http://cybergata.com/roots/3162.htm :
It appears that William de Lancaster I had been in high favor with William, Count of Boulogne and Mortain, Earl of Warren and Lord of Lancaster, who acquired the Earldom of Warren by his marriage with Isabel, the only daughter and heiress of William, third Earl of Warren, and the Honor of Lancaster by confirmation of King, as his rightful inheritance. Earl William, or Henry II, married William de Lancaster to Gundreda, sister of William, third Earl of Warren and widow of Roger, Earl of Warwick. It appears that at the same time, William was enfeoffed of one knight's fee in Ulverston, Warton and Garstang, and important estate of thirty six and one-half carucates of land. It was doubtless that at this time he assumed the surname of Lancaster, with the licence of the his chief lord and the King.

~Farrer, The Chartulary of Cockersand Abbey, Vol. I, Part II, p.307-308

Noted events in his life were:

• Castellan: of William Fitz Duncan's castle of Egremont, 1138.

• Governor: of Castle of Lancaster.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 129 F    i. Avice de Lancaster 148 was born about 1155 in Cumberland, England and died on 1 Jan 1191 about age 36.

+ 130 M    ii. William II de Lancaster 149 died in 1184 in Kendal, Westmoreland, England and was buried in Furness Abbey, England.

90. William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne 97 (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1118 and died in 1148 at age 30.

Research Notes: First husband of Ela (Talvas).

From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :
In her second marriage, to William de Warenne, Elizabeth had three sons and two daughters (for a total of fourteen children - nine during her first marriage, and five during her second):
William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne (b. 1119 dspm 1147) whose daughter Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey married 1stly
William, Count of Boulogne (dsp), yr son of King Stephen, and married 2ndly
Hamelin Plantagenet , an illegitimate half-brother of King Henry II of England by whom she had issue, later earls of Surrey and Warenne.

William married Ela Talvas, of Alençon and Ponthieu,150 daughter of William III Talvas, Count of Alençon & Ponthieu and Hélie, of Burgundy,. Ela was born about 1124 in <Alençon, Normandy>, France, died on 10 Oct 1174 in Bradenstoke Priory, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England about age 50, and was buried on 4 Dec 1174. Other names for Ela were Adela Talvaise and Ida Talvaise.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 131 F    i. Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey 151 died on 13 Jul 1199.

91. Ada de Warenne 98 (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died about 1178. Another name for Ada was Adeline de Warren.

Research Notes: Widow of Conale Petit, Earl of Brittany and Richmond. Sister of William the Lion, King of Scots.

From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

Ada de Warenne (d. ca. 1178 ), who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon , younger son of King David I of Scotland , Earl of Huntingdon by his marriage to the heiress Matilda or Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon (herself great-niece of William I of England ) and had issue. They were parents to Malcolm IV of Scotland and William I of Scotland and their youngest son became David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon . All Kings of Scotland since 1292 were the descendants of Huntingdon.

Ada married Henry, of Huntingdon, Earl of Northumberland & Huntingdon,152 son of David I "The Saint", King of Scots and Maud, of Huntingdon, in 1139. Henry was born in 1114 and died on 12 Jun 1152 at age 38. Another name for Henry was Henry Prince of Scotland.

Research Notes: Eldest son of David I, King of Scots.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 170-23


The child from this marriage was:

+ 132 F    i. Margaret, of Huntingdon 153 died in 1201.

92. Reginald de Warenne (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy. He married Adeline, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William, whose daughter and sole heir Beatrice married first Dodo, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh;

93. Ralph de Warenne (Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois

94. Thierry I, of Lorraine, Count of Flanders 100 (Gertrude, of Flanders54, Robert I, Count of Flanders29, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1099 and died on 17 Jan 1168 about age 69. Other names for Thierry were Dietrich I of Lorraine, Count of Alsace, Thierry of Alsace, and Thierry Count of Flanders.

Research Notes: Youngest son of Thierry II, Duke of Lorraine.

From Wikipedia - Thierry, Count of Flanders :

Thierry of Alsace (Dietrich) (c. 1099 - January 17 , 1168 ), in Flanders known as Diederik van den Elzas, was count of Flanders from 1128 to 1168. He was the youngest son of Duke Thierry II of Lorraine and Gertrude of Flanders (daughter of Robert I of Flanders ). With a record of four campaigns in the Levant and Africa (including participation in the Second Crusade , the failed 1157-1158 siege of the Syrian city Shaizar , and the 1164 invasion of Egypt ), he had a rare and distinguished record of commitment to crusading.

Life
After the murder of his cousin Charles the Good in 1127, Thierry claimed the county of Flanders as grandson of Robert I, but William Clito became count instead with the support of King Louis VI of France . William's politics and attitude towards the autonomy of Flanders made him unpopular, and by the end of the year Bruges , Ghent , Lille , and Saint-Omer recognized Thierry as a rival count. Thierry's supporters came from the Imperial faction of Flanders, and upon his arrival he engaged in battle against William.

Louis VI had Raymond of Martigné , the Archbishop of Reims , excommunicate him, and Louis himself then besieged Lille, but was forced to retire when Henry I of England , William's uncle, transferred his support to Thierry. However, Thierry was defeated at Tielt and Oostkamp and fled to Brugge. He was forced to flee Brugge as well, and went to Aalst , where he was soon under siege from William, Godfrey I of Leuven , and Louis VI. The city was about to be captured when William was found dead on July 27 , 1128 , leaving Thierry as the only claimant to the county.

Thierry set up his government in Ghent and was recognized by all the Flemish cities as well as King Henry, who had his Flemish lords in England swear fealty to him. Thierry himself swore homage to Louis VI after 1132, in order to gain the French king's support against Baldwin IV, Count of Hainaut , who had advanced his own claim on Flanders.

In 1132 his wife, Suanhilde, died, leaving only a daughter. In 1139 then went on pilgrimage to the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem , and married Sibylla of Anjou , daughter of King Fulk of Jerusalem and widow of William Clito; a very prestigious marriage.

This was the first of Thierry's four pilgrimages to the Holy Land . While there he also led a victorious expedition against Caesarea Phillippi , and fought alongside his father-in-law in an invasion of Gilead . He soon returned to Flanders to put down a revolt in the Duchy of Lower Lotharingia , ruled at the time by Godfrey III of Leuven .

Thierry went on crusade a second time in 1147 during the Second Crusade . He led the crossing of the Maeander River in Anatolia and fought at the Battla of Attalya in 1148, and after arriving in the crusader Kingdom he participated in the Council of Acre , where the ill-fated decision to attack Damascus was made.

He participated in the Siege of Damascus , led by his wife's half-brother Baldwin III of Jerusalem , and with the support of Baldwin, Louis VII of France , and Conrad III of Germany , he lay claim to Damascus; the native crusader barons preferred one of their own nobles, Guy Brisebarre, lord of Beirut , but in any case the siege was a failure and all parties returned home.

During his absence, Baldwin IV of Hainaut invaded Flanders and pillaged Artois ; Sibylla reacted strongly and had Hainaut pillaged in response. The Archbishop of Reims intervened and a treaty was signed. When Thierry returned in 1150, he took vengeance on Baldwin IV at Bouchain , with the aid of Henry I, Count of Namur and Henry II of Leez , Bishop of Liège . In the subsequent peace negotiations, Thierry gave his daughter Marguerite in marriage to Baldwin IV's son, the future Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut .

In 1156 Thierry had his eldest son married to Elizabeth of Vermandois , daughter and heiress of Raoul I of Vermandois . In 1156 he returned to the Holy Land, this time with his wife accompanying him. He participated in Baldwin III's siege of Shaizar , but the fortress remained in Muslim hands when a dispute arose between Thierry and Raynald of Chatillon over who would possess it should it be captured. He returned to Flanders 1159 without Sibylla, who remained behind to become a nun at the convent of St. Lazarus in Bethany . Their son Philip had ruled the county in their absence, and he remained co-count after Thierry's return.

In 1164 Thierry returned once more to the Holy Land. He accompanied King Amalric I , another half-brother of Sibylla, to Antioch and Tripoli . He returned home in 1166, and adopted a date palm as his seal, with a crown of laurels on the reverse.

He died on February 4, 1168, and was buried in the Abbey of Watten , between Saint-Omer and Gravelines . His rule had been moderate and peaceful; the highly developed administration of the county in later centuries first began during these years. There had also been great economic and agricultural development, and new commercial enterprises were established; Flanders' greatest territorial expansion occurred under Thierry.

Family
His first wife, Suanhilde, died in 1132, leaving only one daughter:
Laurette of Flanders , who married four times: Iwain, Count of Aalst ; Henry II, Duke of Limburg ; Raoul I of Vermandois , Count of Vermandois ; Henry IV of Luxembourg . Laurette finally retired to a nunnery, where she died in 1170.
Thierry secondly married Sibylla of Anjou , daughter of Fulk V of Anjou and Ermengarde of Maine , and widow of William Clito . Their children were:
Philip of Flanders (died 1191)
Matthew of Alsace (died 1173), married Countess Marie of Boulogne
Margaret I of Flanders (died 1194), married Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut
Gertrude of Flanders (died 1186), married Humbert III of Savoy
Matilda of Flanders, abbess of Fontevrault
Peter of Flanders (died 1176), Bishop of Cambrai

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Flanders: 1128-1168.

Thierry married Sybil, of Anjou,133 daughter of Fulk V "the Young", Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem and Erembourg, Countess of Maine, in 1131. Sybil was born about 1112 in <Anjou, France> and died in 1165 about age 53. Another name for Sybil was Sibylla of Anjou.

Research Notes: Second wife of Thierry I of Lorraine (also known as Dietrich I, Count of Alsace).

From Wikipedia - Sibylla of Anjou :

Sibylla of Anjou (c. 1112-1165) was a daughter of Fulk V of Anjou and Ermengarde of Maine , and wife of William Clito and Thierry, Count of Flanders .

In 1123 Sibylla married William Clito, son of the Norman Robert Curthose and future Count of Flanders . Sibylla brought the County of Maine to this marriage, which was annulled in 1124 on grounds of consanguinity . The annulment was made by Pope Honorius II upon request from Henry I of England , William's uncle; Fulk opposed it and did not consent until Honorius excommunicated him and placed an interdict over Anjou . Sibylla then accompanied her widower father to the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem , where he married Melisende , the heiress of the kingdom, and became king himself in 1131. In 1139 she married Thierry, Count of Flanders , who had arrived on his first pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

She returned to Flanders with her new husband, and during his absence on the Second Crusade the pregnant Sibylla acted as regent of the county. Baldwin IV, Count of Hainaut took the opportunity to attack Flanders, but Sibylla led a counter-attack and pillaged Hainaut . In response Baldwin ravaged Artois . The archbishop of Reims intervened and a truce was signed, but Thierry took vengeance on Baldwin when he returned in 1149.

In 1157 she travelled with Thierry on his third pilgrimage, but after arriving in Jerusalem she separated from her husband and refused to return home with him. She became a nun at the convent of St. Lazarus in Bethany , where her step-aunt, Ioveta of Bethany , was abbess. Ioveta and Sibylla supported Queen Melisende and held some influence over the church, and supported the election of Amalric of Nesle as Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem over a number of other candidates. Sibylla died in Bethany in 1165.

With Thierry she had six children:
Philip , Count of Flanders
Matthew , Count of Boulogne , married Marie of Boulogne
Margaret , Countess of Flanders and Hainaut, married Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut
Gertrude
Matilda
Peter


Children from this marriage were:

+ 133 M    i. Matthew, of Alsace, Count of Boulogne .154

+ 134 F    ii. Margarite, of Lorraine 155 was born between 1140 and 1145 and died on 17 Dec 1195.

+ 135 F    iii. Margaret I, of Flanders 156 died on 15 Nov 1194.

95. Stephen, of Blois, King of England 102 (Adela, of Normandy55, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1096 in Blois, Loire-et-Cher, France, died on 25 Oct 1154 in Dover Priory, Dover, England about age 58, and was buried in Faversham Abbey. Another name for Stephen was Stephen of England.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Stephen of England :

Stephen often known as Stephen of Blois (c. 1096 - 25 October 1154) was a grandson of William the Conqueror . He was the last Norman King of England , from 1135 to his death, and also the Count of Boulogne jure uxoris . His reign was marked by civil war with his rival the Empress Matilda and general chaos, known as The Anarchy . He was succeeded by Matilda's son, Henry II , the first of the Angevin or Plantagenet kings.

Early life
Stephen was born at Blois in France, son of Stephen , Count of Blois , and Adela of England, (daughter of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders ). One of ten children, his surviving brothers were Count Theobald II of Champagne , Henry of Blois , Bishop of Winchester , and William of Sully . He also had four sisters, including Eléonore of Blois .

Stephen was sent to be raised at the English court of his uncle, King Henry I , in 1106. He became Count of Mortain in about 1115, and married Matilda , daughter of the Count of Boulogne , in about 1125, who became Countess of Boulogne. Their marriage was a happy one and his wife was an important supporter during the struggle for the English crown. Stephen became joint ruler of Boulogne in 1128.

Reign

King of England
There were several principal contenders for the succession to Henry I . The least popular was the Empress Matilda , Henry I's only legitimate surviving child, not simply because she was a woman, but because her husband Geoffrey, Count of Anjou was an enemy of the Normans . The other contenders were Robert, Earl of Gloucester , illegitimate son of Henry I, Stephen, and Stephen's older brother, Theobald, Count of Blois . However, Theobald did not want the kingdom, at least not enough to fight for it.[1] Before his death in 1135, Henry I named his daughter Matilda his heir and made the barons of England swear allegiance to her. Stephen was the first baron to do so. However, upon King Henry's death, Stephen claimed the throne, saying Henry had changed his mind on his deathbed and named Stephen as his heir. Once crowned, Stephen gained the support of the majority of the barons as well as Pope Innocent II and the first few years of his reign were peaceful, notwithstanding insurgences by the Welsh, King David I of Scotland , and Baldwin de Redvers.

The Anarchy: War with Matilda
By 1139, Stephen had lost much support and the country sank into a civil war , commonly called The Anarchy . Stephen faced the forces of Empress Matilda at several locations including the Battle of Beverston Castle and the Battle of Lincoln . Bad omens haunted him before the Battle of Lincoln where Stephen faced Matilda's illegitimate brother Robert and Ranulph, Earl of Chester . According to chroniclers, Stephen fought bravely but was captured by a knight named William de Cahaignes (a relative of Ranulph, ancestor of the Keynes family ). Stephen was defeated and brought before his cousin Matilda. He was imprisoned at Bristol .

Stephen's wife rallied support amongst the people from London and the barons. Matilda was, in turn, forced out of London. With the capture of her most able lieutenant, her half-brother the Earl of Gloucester, she was obliged to trade Stephen for him, and Stephen was restored to the throne in November the same year.

In December 1142, the Empress was besieged at Oxford , but managed to escape, dressed in white, across the snow to Wallingford Castle , held by her supporter Brien FitzCount .

In 1147, Empress Matilda's teenage son, the future King Henry II of England , decided to assist in the war effort by raising a small army of mercenaries and invading England. Rumours of this army's size terrified Stephen's retainers, although in truth the force was very small. Having been defeated twice in battle, and with no money to pay his mercenaries, young Henry appealed to his uncle Robert for aid but was turned away. Desperately, and in secret, the boy asked Stephen for help. According to the Gesta Stephani , "On receiving the message, the king...hearkened to the young man..." and bestowed upon him money and other support.

Reconciliation and death
Stephen maintained his precarious hold on the throne for the remainder of his lifetime. However, after a military standoff at Wallingford with Henry, and following the death of his son and heir, Eustace , in 1153, he was persuaded to reach a compromise with Matilda (known as the Treaty of Wallingford or Winchester), whereby Stephen's son William of Blois would be passed over for the English throne, and instead Matilda's son Henry would succeed Stephen.

Stephen died in Dover , at Dover Priory , and was buried in Faversham Abbey , which he had founded with Countess Matilda in 1148.

Besides Eustace, Stephen and Queen Matilda had two other sons, Baldwin (d. before 1135), and William of Blois (Count of Mortain and Boulogne, and Earl of Surrey or Warenne). They also had two daughters, Matilda and Marie of Boulogne . In addition to these children, Stephen fathered at least three illegitimate children , one of whom, Gervase, became Abbot of Westminster .

English royal descendants
Philippa of Hainault , the wife of Edward III , was a descendant of Stephen, and he was thus ancestor of all subsequent kings of England.[3]

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Mortain: 1115-1154.

• King of England: 1135-1154.

Stephen married Matilda, of Boulogne,157 daughter of Eustace III, Count of Boulogne and Lens and Mary, of Scotland, about 1119. Matilda was born about 1105 in Boulogne, France, died on 3 Jul 1151 in Hedingham Castle about age 46, and was buried in Faversham Abbey. Other names for Matilda were Matilda I of Boulogne and Maud of Boulogne.

Death Notes: Wikipedia has d. 3 May 1152.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Matilda of Boulogne :

Matilda I or Maud (1105? - 3 May, 1152), was suo jure Countess of Boulogne . She was also wife of King Stephen of England and Queen of England .

History
She was born in Boulogne , France , the daughter of Eustace III, Count of Boulogne and his wife Mary of Scotland, daughter of King Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret of Scotland . Matilda was first cousin of her husband's rival, Empress Matilda . Through her maternal grandmother, Matilda was descended from the pre-Conquest English kings.

In 1125, Matilda married Stephen of Blois , Count of Mortain, who possessed a large honour in England. When Matilda's father abdicated and retired to a monastery the same year, this was joined with Boulogne and the similarly large English honour Matilda inherited. On Eustace III's death, Matilda and her husband became joint rulers of Boulogne. Two children, a son and a daughter, were born to the Countess and Count of Boulogne during the reign of King Henry I , who had granted Stephen and Matilda a residence in London. [1] The son was named Baldwin, after Matilda's uncle, King Baldwin I of Jerusalem . [2] The daughter was named Matilda. Baldwin died in early childhood and the young Matilda is thought to have died during childhood too, although some scholars state that she lived long enough to be espoused to the count of Milan. [3]

On the death of Henry I of England in 1135, Stephen rushed to England, taking advantage of Boulogne's control of the closest seaports, and was crowned king, beating his rival, the Empress Matilda . Matilda was heavily pregnant at that time and crossed the Channel after gaving birth to a son, Eustace , who would one day succeed her as Count of Boulogne. Matilda was crowned queen at Easter - March 22, 1136. [4]

In the civil war that followed, known as the Anarchy , Matilda proved to be her husband's strongest supporter. After he was captured at the Battle of Lincoln she rallied the king's partisans, and raised an army with the help of William of Ypres . Empress Matilda was besieging Stephen's brother Henry of Blois , but she, in turn, besieged the Empress, driving her away and capturing the Empress's brother, Robert of Gloucester .

Around 1125, her father died and she succeeded as Countess of Boulogne. She ruled this area jointly with her husband until 1150, when she reigned alone until 1151, when the County was given to her eldest son Eustace, then her surviving son William inherited it, and then her daughter Marie.

Matilda died of a fever at Hedingham Castle , Essex , England and is buried at Faversham Abbey , which was founded by her and her husband. [5]

Issue
Stephen and Matilda had three sons:
Eustace IV, Count of Boulogne
Baldwin of Boulogne (d. before 1135)
William of Blois , Count of Mortain and Boulogne and Earl of Surrey
They also had two daughters:
Matilda of Boulogne
Marie of Boulogne


The child from this marriage was:

+ 136 F    i. Marie, of Blois, Countess of Boulogne 158 was born in 1136 and died in 1182 at age 46.

96. Lithuaise 103 (Adela, of Normandy55, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Sister of Stephen of Blois, King of England.

Lithuaise married Milon I "le Grand", Seigneur Montlhéry and de Bray.103

The child from this marriage was:

+ 137 F    i. Isabel de Montlhéry, Viscomtessa de Troyes .103

97. EmpressMatilda, Countess of Anjou 104 (Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 7 Feb 1102 and died on 10 Sep 1167 about age 65. Other names for Matilda were Mathilda of England, Empress Maud Countess of Anjou, and Maude of England.

Birth Notes: Ancestral Roots Line 1-23 has b. abt. 1102-1104; Line 118-25 has b. 1104.
Some other source has b. Feb 1101

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Empress Matilda :

Empress Matilda, also known as Matilda of England or Maude (c. 7 February 1102 - 10 September 1167) was the daughter and heir of King Henry I of England . Matilda and her younger brother, William Adelin , were the only legitimate children of King Henry. Her brother died young in the White ship disaster , leaving Matilda as the last heir from the paternal line of her grandfather William the Conqueror .

As a child, Matilda was betrothed and later married to Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor . From her marriage to Henry, she acquired the title Empress. The couple had no known children. When widowed, she was married to the much younger Geoffrey of Anjou , by whom she became the mother of three sons, the eldest of whom became King Henry II of England .

Matilda was the first female ruler of the Kingdom of England . However the length of her effective rule was quite brief - a few months in 1141 - and she was never crowned and failed to consolidate her rule (legally and politically). Because of this she is normally excluded from lists of English monarchs, and her rival (and cousin) Stephen of Blois is routinely listed as monarch for the period 1135-1154. Their warring rivalry for the throne led to years of unrest and civil war in England that have been called The Anarchy . She did secure her inheritance of the Duchy of Normandy - through the military feats of her husband Geoffrey - and she campaigned unstintingly for her oldest son's inheritance, living to see him ascend the throne in 1154.

(In Latin texts Matilda was sometimes called Maude . This is a modernised spelling of the Norman-French form of her name, Mahaut.)

Early life
Matilda was the firstborn of two children to Henry I of England and his wife Matilda of Scotland (also known as Edith). Her maternal grandparents were Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret of Scotland . Margaret was daughter of Edward the Exile and granddaughter of Edmund II of England . (Most historians believe Matilda was born at Winchester , but one, John Fletcher (1990), argues for the possibility of the royal palace at Sutton Courtenay in Oxfordshire .)

First marriage: Holy Roman Empress
When she was seven years old, Matilda was betrothed to Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor ; at nine, she was sent to the Holy Roman Empire (Germany) to begin training for the life of Empress consort . The royal couple were married at Worms on January 7, 1114, and Matilda accompanied her husband on tours to Rome and Tuscany . After time, the young wife of the Emperor acted as regent , mainly in Italy, in his absence[1]. Emperor Henry died in 1125. The imperial couple had no surviving offspring, but Herman of Tournai states that Matilda bore a son who lived only a short while.

Despite being popularly known by the title "Empress " from her first marriage, Matilda's right to the title was dubious. She was never crowned Holy Roman Empress by a legitimate Pope - which ceremony was normally required to achieve the title; indeed, in later years she encouraged chroniclers to believe she had been crowned by the Pope. Contemporary, she was called German Queen by her husband's bishops, while her formal title was recorded as "Queen of the Romans". Still, "Empress" was arguably an appropriate courtesy title for the wife of an Emperor who had been crowned by the Pope.

In 1120 her brother William Adelin was drowned in the disastrous wreck of the White Ship , which left Matilda as the only legitimate child of her father King Henry . Like Matilda, her cousin Stephen of Blois was a grandchild of William (the Conqueror) of Normandy ; but her paternal line made her senior in right of succession to his maternal line.

Second marriage: Countess of Anjou
Matilda returned to England a young widow, age 23, and dowager "Empress" - a status of considerable pride to her. There Henry named her his heir to both the English throne and his Duchy of Normandy . Henry saw to it that the Anglo-Norman barons (including Stephen of Blois ) were sworn (several times) to accept Matilda as ruler if Henry died without a male heir.

Henry then arranged a second marriage for Matilda; as he aimed to achieve peace between the fractious barons of Normandy and Anjou. On 17 June 1128, Matilda, aged 26, was married to Geoffrey of Anjou , aged 15, who also was Count of Maine and heir apparent to (his father) the Count of Anjou - which title he soon acquired, and by which Matilda became Countess of Anjou. It was a title she rarely used. Geoffrey called himself "Plantagenet " from the broom flower (planta genista) he adopted as his personal emblem. So Plantagenet became the dynastic name of that powerful line of English kings who descended from Matilda and Geoffrey.

Matilda's marriage with Geoffrey was troubled; there were frequent long separations, but they had three sons and she survived him. The eldest son, Henry , was born on 5 March 1133. In 1134, she nearly died in childbirth, following the birth of her second son, Geoffrey, Count of Nantes . A third son, William X, Count of Poitou , was born in 1136.

When her father died in Normandy, on 1 December 1135, Matilda was with her husband, in Anjou ; and, crucially, too far away from events rapidly unfolding in England and Normandy. Stephen of Blois rushed to England upon learning of Henry's death; in London he moved quickly to grasp the crown of England from its appointed heir.

But Matilda was game to contest Stephen in both realms; she and her husband Geoffrey entered Normandy and began military campaigns to claim her inheritance. Progress was uneven at first, but she persevered; even so, it was not until 1139 that Matilda felt secure enough in Normandy to turn her attentions to invading England and fighting Stephen directly.
In Normandy, Geoffrey secured all fiefdoms west and south of the Seine by 1143; in January 1144, he crossed the Seine and took Rouen without resistance. He assumed the title Duke of Normandy , and Matilda became Duchess of Normandy. Geoffrey and Matilda held the duchy conjointly until 1149, then ceded it to their son, Henry, which event was soon ratified by King Louis VII of France .

Struggle for throne of England
On the death of her father, Henry I, in 1135, Matilda expected to succeed to the throne of England , but her cousin, Stephen of Blois , a nephew of Henry I, usurped the throne with the support of most of the barons, breaking the oath he had previously made to defend her rights. The civil war which followed was bitter and prolonged, with neither side gaining the ascendancy for long, but it was not until 1139 that Matilda could command the military strength necessary to challenge Stephen within his own realm. Stephen's wife, the Countess of Boulogne who was also named Matilda , was the Empress's maternal cousin. During the war, Matilda's most loyal and capable supporter was her illegitimate half-brother, Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester .

Matilda's greatest triumph came in April 1141, when her forces defeated and captured King Stephen at the Battle of Lincoln . He was made a prisoner and effectively deposed.

Her advantage lasted only a few months. When she marched on London , the city was ready to welcome her and support her coronation . She used the title of Lady of the English and planned to assume the title of queen upon coronation (the custom which was followed by her grandsons, Richard and John ).[2] However, she refused the citizens' request to have their taxes halved and, because of her own arrogance [2], she found the gates of London shut and the civil war reignited on 24 June 1141. By November, Stephen was free, having been exchanged for the captured Robert of Gloucester, and a year later, the tables were turned when Matilda was besieged at Oxford but escaped to Wallingford , supposedly by fleeing across the snow-covered land in a white cape. In 1141 she had escaped Devizes in a similarly clever manner, by disguising herself as a corpse and being carried out for burial. In 1148, Matilda and Henry returned to Normandy , following the death of Robert of Gloucester, and the reconquest of that county by her husband. Upon their arrival, Geoffrey turned Normandy over to his son, and retired to his own county of Anjou .

Later life
Matilda's first son, Henry , was showing signs of becoming a successful leader. Although the civil war had been decided in Stephen's favour, his reign was troubled. In 1153, the death of his son Eustace, combined with the arrival of a military expedition led by Henry, led him to acknowledge the latter as his heir by the Treaty of Wallingford .

Matilda retired to Rouen in Normandy during her last years, where she maintained her own court and presided over the government of the duchy in the absence of Henry. She intervened in the quarrels between her eldest son Henry and her second son Geoffrey, but peace between the brothers was brief. Geoffrey rebelled against Henry twice before his sudden death in 1158. Relations between Henry and his youngest brother, William X, Count of Poitou , were more cordial, and William was given vast estates in England. Archbishop Thomas Becket refused to allow William to marry the Countess of Surrey and the young man fled to Matilda's court at Rouen. William, who was his mother's favourite child, died there in January 1164, reportedly of disappointment and sorrow. She attempted to mediate in the quarrel between her son Henry and Becket, but was unsuccessful.

Although she gave up hope of being crowned in 1141, her name always preceded that of her son Henry, even after he became king. Matilda died at Notre Dame du Pré near Rouen and was buried in the Abbey church of Bec-Hellouin, Normandy. Her body was transferred to the Rouen Cathedral in 1847; her epitaph reads: "Great by Birth, Greater by Marriage, Greatest in her Offspring: Here lies Matilda, the daughter, wife, and mother of Henry."

Matilda married Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor, son of Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor and Bertha, of Savoy, on 7 Jan 1114 in Worms, (Rhine-Palatinate, Germany). Henry was born on 8 Jan 1086 and died on 23 May 1125 at age 39.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Bertha of Savoy

Matilda next married Geoffrey V Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy,134 son of Fulk V "the Young", Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem and Erembourg, Countess of Maine, on 22 May 1128 in Le Mans, France. Geoffrey was born on 24 Aug 1113 in Anjou, France, died on 7 Sep 1151 at age 38, and was buried in Le Mans, France. Other names for Geoffrey were Geoffrey V Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy and Geoffrey 'the Fair' Plantagenet Count of Anjou.

Marriage Notes: Marriage date may have been 3 April 1127 (Ancestral Roots Line 1-23). Line 118-25 (Geoffrey V) has m. 22 May 1127.

Research Notes: Second husband of Matilda.

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871913 :
'The Fair' Count of Anjou (1129-1151); founder of the Plantagenet dynasty. Geoffey's nickname derived from his physical appearance - he was said to be tall, handsome, graceful and strong. He was also known as Geoffrey Plantagenet, appearantly from the sprig of broom (genet) he wore in his hat. In 1127, aged 14, he was married to Matilda, daughter and heiress of Henry I of England and the widow of the Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. They disliked each other, but maintained an uneasy political alliance and produces three sons, Henry (the future Henry II of England), Geoffrey and William. An illegitimate son, Hamelin became the Duke of Salisbury. Geoffrey spent much of his youth imposing order on his unruly vassals, including his own brother Helias II, Count of Maine, who rebelled against him in 1131; Geoffrey captured Helias and held him prisoner in Tours, Helias died soon after his release from a disease contracted in prison. In 1135 Henry I of England died, and Matilda's cousin Stephen of Blois (RIN # 1643) seized the English throne, together with Normandy, traditionally coveted by the counts of Anjou. Geoffrey laid claim to the duchy in his wife's right. Between 1135-1138 Geoffrey launched four expeditions into Normandy, none of which achieved great success. The expedition in 1137 was striken by dysentery, and forced to return swiftly to Anjou. In 1139 Matilda invaded England, seeking to press her claim to the English throne, and Geoffrey remained in Anjou to continue the war against Normandy. The Morman barons opposed Geoffrey, not through loyalty to Stephen, who had only visited Normandy once, but out of hatred of their traditional enemy, Anjou. However, Norman morale was weakened when Matilda captured Stephen at Lincoln in 1141, and many castles surrendered to Geoffrey, leaving him in control of most of the lands between Bayeux and the Seine. In 1142 he took the Avranchin and Mortain, and in 1143 moved east of the Seine, overunning the Cotentin. He was invested as Duke of Normandy in 144 after the fall of Rouen, and Arques, the last castle opposing him, capitulated in 1145, leaving him unchallenged master of Normandy. After the conquest of Normandy, Geoffrey joined Louis VII of France in the abortive Second Crusade (1147-9), returning in 1149. In 1150 he ceded Normandy to his son Henry, who also inhereted the family claim to the English throne. Geoffrey died in 1151, and was buried in Le Mans Cathedral; founder of a great dynasty of kings through his son, Henry II of England. For more on the Second Crusade, see RIN # 1618.
!The Plantagenet Chronicles: 38-63,80,102,140,154

----

From Wikipedia - Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou :

Geoffrey (24 August 1113 - 7 September 1151), called the Handsome (French : le Bel) and Plantagenet, was the Count of Anjou , Touraine , and Maine by inheritance from 1129 and then Duke of Normandy by conquest from 1144. By his marriage to the Empress Matilda , daughter and heiress of Henry I of England , Geoffrey had a son, Henry Curtmantle , who succeeded to the English throne and founded the Plantagenet dynasty to which Geoffrey gave his nickname.

Biography
Geoffrey was the elder son of Fulk V of Anjou and Eremburga of La Flèche , heiress of Elias I of Maine . Geoffrey received his nickname for the yellow sprig of broom blossom (genêt is the French name for the genista, or broom shrub) he wore in his hat as a badge. King Henry I of England, having heard good reports on Geoffrey's talents and prowess, sent his royal legates to Anjou to negotiate a marriage between Geoffrey and his own daughter, Matilda. Consent was obtained from both parties, and on 10 June 1128 the fifteen-year-old Geoffrey was knighted in Rouen by King Henry in preparation for the wedding. Interestingly, there was no opposition to the marriage from the Church, despite the fact that Geoffrey's sister was the widow of Matilda's brother (only son of King Henry) which fact had been used to annul the marriage of another of Geoffrey's sisters to the Norman pretender William Clito .

On 17 June 1128 Geoffrey married Empress Matilda, the daughter and heiress of King Henry I of England by his first wife Edith of Scotland , and widow of Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor . The marriage was meant to seal a peace between England/Normandy and Anjou. She was eleven years older than Geoffrey, very proud of her status as an Empress (as opposed to being a mere Countess). Their marriage was a stormy one with frequent long separations, but she bore him three sons and survived him.

The year after the marriage Geoffrey's father left for Jerusalem (where he was to become king ), leaving Geoffrey behind as count of Anjou. John of Marmoutier describes Geoffrey as handsome, red-headed, jovial, and a great warrior; however, Ralph of Diceto alleges that his charm concealed his cold and selfish character.

When King Henry I died in 1135, Matilda at once entered Normandy to claim her inheritance. The border districts submitted to her, but England chose her cousin Stephen of Blois for its king, and Normandy soon followed suit. The following year, Geoffrey gave Ambrieres, Gorron, and Chatilon-sur-Colmont to Juhel de Mayenne, on condition that he help obtain the inheritance of Geoffrey's wife. In 1139 Matilda landed in England with 140 knights, where she was besieged at Arundel Castle by King Stephen. In the "Anarchy" which ensued, Stephen was captured at Lincoln in February, 1141, and imprisoned at Bristol. A legatine council of the English church held at Winchester in April 1141 declared Stephen deposed and proclaimed Matilda "Lady of the English". Stephen was subsequently released from prison and had himself recrowned on the anniversary of his first coronation.

During 1142 and 1143, Geoffrey secured all of Normandy west and south of the Seine, and, on 14 January 1144, he crossed the Seine and entered Rouen. He assumed the title of Duke of Normandy in the summer of 1144. In 1144, he founded an Augustine priory at Chateau-l'Ermitage in Anjou. Geoffrey held the duchy until 1149, when he and Matilda conjointly ceded it to their son, Henry, which cession was formally ratified by King Louis VII of France the following year.

Geoffrey also put down three baronial rebellions in Anjou, in 1129, 1135, and 1145-1151. He was often at odds with his younger brother, Elias , whom he had imprisoned until 1151. The threat of rebellion slowed his progress in Normandy, and is one reason he could not intervene in England. In 1153, the Treaty of Westminster allowed Stephen should remain King of England for life and that Henry, the son of Geoffrey and Matilda should succeed him.

Geoffrey died suddenly on September 7, 1151. According to John of Marmoutier, Geoffrey was returning from a royal council when he was stricken with fever. He arrived at Château-du-Loir , collapsed on a couch, made bequests of gifts and charities, and died. He was buried at St. Julien's Cathedral in Le Mans France. Geoffrey and Matilda's children were:
Henry II of England (1133-1189)
Geoffrey, Count of Nantes (1 June 1134 Rouen - 26 July 1158 Nantes ) died unmarried and was buried in Nantes
William X, Count of Poitou (1136-1164) died unmarried

Geoffrey also had illegitimate children by an unknown mistress (or mistresses): Hamelin ; Emme, who married Dafydd Ab Owain Gwynedd , Prince of North Wales ; and Mary, who became a nun and Abbess of Shaftesbury and who may be the poetess Marie de France . Adelaide of Angers is sometimes sourced as being the mother of Hamelin.

The first reference to Norman heraldry was in 1128, when Henry I of England knighted his son-in-law Geoffrey and granted him a badge of gold lions (or leopards ) on a blue background. (A gold lion may already have been Henry's own badge.) Henry II used two gold lions and two lions on a red background are still part of the arms of Normandy. Henry's son, Richard I , added a third lion to distinguish the arms of England.

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Anjou, Touraine and Maine: 1129-1151.

• Duke of Normandy: 1144-1151.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 138 M    i. Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England was born on 5 Mar 1132 in Le Mans, France, died on 6 Jul 1189 at age 57, and was buried in Fontévrault Abbey, France.

98. William Adelin, Duke of Normandy 105 (Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1103 and died on 25 Nov 1120 at age 17. Other names for William were William Ætheling Duke of Normandy and William III Duke of Normandy.

Death Notes: Died in the White Ship tragedy.

99. Maud, Princess of England 106 (Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1091 in England.

Research Notes: Illegitimate daughter of Henry I.

Maud married Conan III "le Gros", Duke of Bretagne,106 son of Alan IV Fergent and Hermengarde, Countess of Bretagne, in Mar 1113 in England. Conan was born about 1096 in <Bretagne, France> and died on 17 Sep 1148 about age 52.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 139 F    i. Constance, Princess of Bretagne 106 was born about 1118 in <Bretagne, France>.

100. Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester 109 (Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1090 in <Caen, Normandy, France>, died on 31 Oct 1147 in Bristol, Gloucestershire, England about age 57, and was buried in St. James Priory, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England. Other names for Robert were Robert "the King's son" de Caen Earl of Gloucester, Robert de Caen "the Consul and" Earl of Glouchester.

Research Notes: Natural son of Henry I. Half-brother of Empress Matilda.

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 123-26:
"ROBERT DE CAEN, Earl of Gloucester, 1122-1147 (natural son of Henry I, prob. by a NN dau. of the Gay or Gayt family of N. Oxfordshire... b. abt 1090, d. Bristol, 31 Oct. 1147, called 'the Consul'; m. Maud Fitz Hamon, dau. and h. of Robert Fitz Hamon, d. 1107, seigneur of Crelly in Calvados, Normandy, Lord of Thoringni, etc., and Sybil de Montgomery, dau. of Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Shrewsbury."

Also line 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont)
--------
From Wikipedia - Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester :

Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (c. 1090 - October 31 , 1147 ) was an illegitimate son of King Henry I of England , and one of the dominant figures of the period of English history sometimes called The Anarchy . He is also known as Robert of Caen, and Robert "the Consul", though both names are used by later historians and have little contemporary justification, other than the fact that Robert's clerks made a practice of using the Latin word consul rather than the more common comes for his title of 'Earl'.

Early life
Robert was the eldest of Henry's many illegitimate children. He was born well before his father's accession to the English throne, probably in the late 1080s, as he had himself had a son by 1104. There are numerous references noting him to have been the son of Sybil Corbet , heiress to Robert Corbet, Lord of Alcester, whose family had land in both England and Normandy. He was born in Caen, Normandy and was the first of several children between Henry and his Mistress Sybil Corbet. [1]

Robert was acknowledged at birth, though in view of the vicissitudes of his father's career between 1087 and 1096 it is unlikely he was raised in his household. He was educated to a high standard, was literate in Latin and had a serious interest in both history and philosophy, which indicates that he was at least partly raised in a clerical household, a suggestion made all the more likely as his first known child, born around 1104, was born to a daughter of Samson, Bishop of Worcester (died 1112) who up till 1096 had been a Royal Chaplain and Treasurer of Bayeux . It may be significant that his next brother Richard was brought up in an episcopal household, that of Robert Bloet , bishop of Lincoln . Robert later received dedications from both Geoffrey of Monmouth and William of Malmesbury . William's 'Historia Novella' contains a flattering portrait of the Earl.

Robert appears at court in Normandy in 1113, and in 1107 he had married Mabel, eldest daughter and heir of Robert Fitzhamon , who brought him the substantial honour of Gloucester in England, Glamorgan in Wales and the honours of Sainte-Scholasse-sur-Sarthe and Évrecy in Normandy, as well as Creully . In 1121 or 1122 his father created him Earl of Gloucester . Through his marriage to Mabel he became second Lord of Glamorgan, and gained possession of Cardiff Castle , and was responsible for the building of the stone keep there, which remains as the best preserved Norman shell keep in Wales, and one of the best in the British Isles. Robert had considerable authority and autonomy, to the extent that he even minted his own coinage, today preserved in the British Museum .

Family and children
He married, around 1107, Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester (died 1156), daughter of Robert Fitzhamon and Sibyl de Montgomery . Their children were:
William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester , died 1183. He married Hawise (died 1197) daughter of Robert II, Earl of Leicester.
Roger , Bishop of Worcester , (died 9 August 1179 , Tours ).
Hamon, killed at the siege of Toulouse in 1159.
Robert. (died before 1157) Also called Robert of Ilchester in documents. He married Hawise, (died after 1210) daughter of Baldwin de Redvers and Adeliz. Their daughter Mabel married Jordan de Cambernon .
Maud , (died 1190), wife of Ranulph de Gernon, 2nd Earl of Chester .
Philip, Castellan of Cricklade , (died after 1147). He took part in the Second Crusade .

Earl Robert had an illegitimate son, Richard, bishop of Bayeux (1135-1142), by Isabel de Douvres , sister of Richard de Douvres , bishop of Bayeux (1107-1133).

Noted events in his life were:

• 2nd Lord of Glamorgan: by right of his wife

• Created: 1st Earl of Gloucester, Aug 1122.

Robert married Mabel FitzHamon, of Gloucester,159 daughter of Robert FitzHamon, Sieur de Creully and Sybil Montgomery, in 1107. Mabel was born in 1090 in Gloucestershire, England and died on 29 Sep 1157 in Bristol, Gloucestershire, England at age 67. Other names for Mabel were Maud FitzHammon and Maud FitzHamon.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont)
-----
From Wikipedia - Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester :

Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester, Countess of Gloucester (1090- 29 September 1157[1]), was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman, and a wealthy heiress who brought the lordship of Gloucester , among other prestigious honours to her husband, Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester upon their marriage. He was the illegitimate son of King Henry I of England . Her father was Robert Fitzhamon , Lord of Gloucester and Glamorgan . As she was the eldest daughter of four, and her younger sisters had become nuns, Mabel inherited all of his honours and properties upon his death in 1107.


Family
Mabel was born in Gloucestershire , England in 1090, the eldest of the three daughters of Robert FitzHamon, Lord of Glamorgan, and Gloucester, and his wife, Sybil de Montgomery. Her three younger sisters, Hawise, Cecile and Amice[2] all became nuns, making Mabel the sole heiress to her father's lordships and vast estates in England, Wales, and Normandy.

Her paternal grandfather was Hamon, Sheriff of Kent . Her maternal grandparents were Roger de Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and Mabel Talvas of Belleme.

In March 1107, her father died in Normandy , leaving his lordships and estates to Mabel. Her mother married secondly Jean, Sire de Raimes.[3]



Marriage and children
In 1107, Mabel married Robert of Caen, an illegitimate son of King Henry I by his mistress Sybil Corbet. Their marriage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis who also names her parents.[4] He would later become an important figure during the turbulent period in English history known as The Anarchy which occurred in the reign of King Stephen of England . Throughout the civil war , he was a loyal supporter of his half-sister Empress Matilda who would make him the chief commander of her army. He had originally sworn fealty to King Stephen, but after quarrelling with him in 1137, his English and Welsh possessions were forfeited, and thus he joined forces with Matilda.[5]

Mabel brought to her husband, the honours of Gloucester in England, Glamorgan in Wales, Sainte-Scholasse-sur-Sarthe, Evrecy and Creully in Normandy. By right of his wife, he became the 2nd Lord of Glamorgan, and gained possession of her father's castle of Cardiff in Wales. In August 1122, he was created 1st Earl of Gloucester; henceforth, Mabel was styled as Countess of Gloucester.

Together Robert and Mabel had at least eight children:

William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester (23 November 1112- 23 November 1183), married Hawise de Beaumont by whom he had five children, including Isabella of Gloucester , the first wife of King John of England , and Amice FitzRobert, Countess of Gloucester.
Roger, Bishop of Worcester (died 9 August 1179)
Hamon FitzRobert, (died 1159), killed in the Siege of Toulouse.
Robert FitzRobert of Ilchester (died before 1157), married Hawise de Redvers, by whom he had a daughter Mabel who in her turn married Jordan de Cambernon.
Richard FitzRobert, Sire de Creully (died 1175), inherited the seigneury of Creully from Mabel, and became the ancestor of the Sires de Creully. He married the daughter of Hughes de Montfort by whom he had five children.
Philip FitzRobert, (died after 1147), Castellan of Cricklade . He took part in the Second Crusade .
Maud FitzRobert (died 29 July 1190), married Ranulf de Gernon , 4th Earl of Chester by whom she had three children.
Mabel FitzRobert, married Aubrey de Vere

Robert also sired an illegitimate son, Richard, Bishop of Bayeux by Isabel de Douvres.

Mabel's husband died on 31 October 1147. Mabel herself died on 29 September 1157 in Bristol at the age of sixty-seven years.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 140 F    i. Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester 160 was born about 1120 in Glouchestershire, England and died on 29 Jul 1190 in Chester, Cheshire, England about age 70.

+ 141 M    ii. William FitzRobert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester was born about 1128 and died on 23 Nov 1183 about age 55.

Robert next married Elizabeth.

Research Notes: Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Robert next married Maud.

Research Notes: Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

101. Elizabeth, Princess of England 111 (Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1095 in <Talby, Yorkshire, England>. Another name for Elizabeth was Isabel.

Research Notes: Probably the mother of Gunnild of Dunbar. Youngest illegitimate daughter of Henry I.

Elizabeth married Fergus, Lord of Galloway 161 in 1124 in Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland. Fergus was born about 1090 in <Galloway, Scotland>, died in 1161 in Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh, Edinburghshire, Scotland about age 71, and was buried on 12 May 1161 in Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh, Edinburghshire, Scotland.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 142 M    i. Uchtred, Lord of Galloway 161 was born about 1118 in <Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland> and died on 22 Sep 1174 about age 56.

102. Judith, of Bavaria (Henry I, Duke of Bavaria57, Judith, of Normandy31, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1100 and died in 1130 at age 30.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 166-25.

Judith married Frederick II, of Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia,162 son of Frederick I von Büren, of Hohenstaufen, Duke of Alsace and Swabia and Agnes, of Germany, in 1121. Frederick was born in 1090 and died on 6 Apr 1147 at age 57. Another name for Frederick was Frederick II Duke of Swabia.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 45-25.

From Wikipedia - Frederick II, Duke of Swabia :

Frederick II (1090 - 6 April 1147 ), called the One-Eyed, was the second Hohenstaufen duke of Swabia from 1105. He was the eldest son of Frederick I and Agnes .

He succeeded his father in 1105. In 1121 he married Judith of Bavaria, a member of the powerful House of Guelph . On the death of Emperor Henry V , his uncle, Frederick stood for election as King of the Romans with the support of his younger brother Conrad , duke of Franconia and several houses. However, he lost this election of 1125 to Lothar III , crowned Emperor later in 1133.

A conflict erupted between Frederick and his supporters, and Lothar. Encouraged by Albert, Archbishop of Mainz , who loathed the supporters of the late Emperor Henry V, Lothar besieged Nuremberg in 1127. Frederick relieved the siege of Nuremberg in 1127 and occupied Speyer in 1128. The attempt of Henry the Proud , duke of Bavaria, to capture Frederick during negotiations failed (1129). However, afterwards supporters of Lothar won a number of victories both in Germany and in Italy. Speyer (1129), Nuremberg (1130) and Ulm (1134) were captured and in October 1134 Frederick submitted to the emperor. In 1135 both Frederick and Conrad were finally reconciled with Lothar. After Lothar's death (1137) and election of Conrad as King of the Romans (1138) Frederick supported his brother in the struggle with Guelphs . According to Otto of Freising , Frederick was "so faithful a knight to his sovereign and so helpful a friend to his uncle that by valor he supported the tottering honor of the realm, fighting manfully against its foes..."

Frederick's second wife, Agnes, was the niece of his old enemy Albert of Mainz.

Children
With Judith of Bavaria (d. 1130 or 1131), daughter of Henry IX, Duke of Bavaria :
Frederick III Barbarossa (1122-1190), duke of Swabia and Holy Roman Emperor as Frederick I
Bertha (1123-1195), married Matthias I, Duke of Lorraine
With Agnes of Saarbrücken (d.~1147):
Conrad of Hohenstaufen (also called Konrad) (1134/1136-1195), Count Palatine of the Rhine
Judith (1135-1191), married Louis II, Landgrave of Thuringia


The child from this marriage was:

+ 143 M    i. Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor was born in 1122, died on 10 Jun 1190 at age 68, and was buried in Holy Land.

103. Hélie, of Burgundy 114 (Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy59, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1080 and died on 28 Feb 1141 in Abbey of Perseigne about age 61. Other names for Hélie were Alix of Burgundy, Ela of Burgundy, Alix de Bourgogne, and Helia Countess Burgundy.

Death Notes: May have died on 28 Feb 1142.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Helie of Burgundy :

Helie of Burgundy (c.1080 - 28 February 1141 ) was the daughter of Eudes I and Sibylla of Burgundy.

In June 1095, she married Bertrand of Toulouse , as his second wife. The two had one son, Pons of Tripoli (c.1098-1137).
Bertrand succeeded his father as Count of Toulouse in 1105, and in 1108, he set out for Outremer to claim his father's rights as Count of Tripoli . Helie accompanied him on this expedition, which resulted in the capture of Tripoli in 1109; shortly after, their nephew, William-Jordan died of wounds, giving Bertrand an undisputed claim to Tripoli.

Bertrand died in 1112, and Pons succeeded him in Tripoli. Helie returned to France, where she married William III of Ponthieu in 1115. They had twelve children, including two named Robert, two named William, and two named Enguerrand:
Guy II of Ponthieu (d. 1147)
William (d. aft. 1166)
Robert
Robert de Garennes (d. aft. 1171), a monk
William
Enguerrand
Enguerrand
Mabile
John I, Count of Alençon (d. 1191)
Clemence (d. bef. 1189), married Juhel, Sire de Mayenne
Philippa (d. bef. 1149)
Ela (d. 10 October 1174 ), married first William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey , and second Patrick of Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury

Helie died on 28 February 1141 , in the Abbey de Perseigne.

Hélie married William III Talvas, Count of Alençon & Ponthieu,163 son of Robert II de Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury and Agnes, about 1115. William was born about 1095 and died on 30 Jun 1172 about age 77. Other names for William were William III of Ponthieu, William Talvas Montgomery le Despencer, and William Talvas Montgomery le Despencer.

Death Notes: May have been 20 June 1172 or 30 June 1171.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - William III, Count of Ponthieu :

William III of Ponthieu (c. 1095-20 June 1172), son of Robert II of Bellême and Agnes of Ponthieu . He is also called William (II; III) Talvas.

He assumed the county of Ponthieu some time before 1111, upon the death of his mother. His father escaped capture at the battle of Tinchebrai (1106); but later, as envoy for King Louis of France , he went to the English court and was arrested by King Henry of England and was never released from prison. William was naturally driven by this to oppose King Henry, and his allegiance to count Geoffrey of Anjou caused Henry to seize certain of William's castles in Normandy.

Family
His wife was Helie of Burgundy , daughter of Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy . The Gesta Normannorum Ducum says that they had five children, three sons and two daughters: Guy II is called "the eldest son", but the editors doubt this; he assumed the county of Ponthieu during his father Talvas' lifetime, but preceded him in death (Guy II died 1147; William Talvas died 1171); his daughters married Juhel, son of Walter of Mayenne , and William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey .


Children from this marriage were:

+ 144 M    i. Guy II, of Ponthieu 164 was born about 1120 and died in 1147 about age 27.

+ 145 F    ii. Ela Talvas, of Alençon and Ponthieu 150 was born about 1124 in <Alençon, Normandy>, France, died on 10 Oct 1174 in Bradenstoke Priory, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England about age 50, and was buried on 4 Dec 1174.

+ 146 M    iii. Thurston le Despencer 165 was born in 1122 in London, England.

Hélie next married Bertrand, Count of Toulouse 166 in 1095. Bertrand died in 1112.

104. Alix de Bourgogne 116 (Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy59, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1094 in Burgundy, France and died on 28 Feb 1142 at age 48. Other names for Alix were Alix de Bourgogne, Helia de Burgogne, and Alice Countess Burgundy.

Birth Notes: May have been born around 1104.

Alix married William Talvas Montgomery le Despencer.167 William was born in 1090 in Normandy, (France) and died on 29 Jun 1172 at age 82. Other names for William were William Talvas Montgomery le Despencer and William Talvas Montgomery le Despencer.

Birth Notes: May have been born around 1100 in Elington, Lincolnshire, England.

105. Adélarde de Vignory 118 (Beatrice, of Burgundy61, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died after 1140. Another name for Adélarde was Hodiarde de Vignory.

Adélarde married Roger I de Joinville, Seigneur de Joinville, son of Geoffroi de Joinville, Seigneur de Joinville and Blanche, of Reynel,. Roger died after 1137.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 71A-26


The child from this marriage was:

+ 147 M    i. Geoffroi III de Joinville, Sénéchal of Champagne and of Bar-sur-Seine 168 was born before 1127 and died in 1188.


106. Afonso I, King of Portugal 119 (Henry, of Burgundy, Count of Portugal63, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 25 Jul 1109 in Viseu, Viseu, Portugal, died on 6 Dec 1185 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal at age 76, and was buried in Santa Cruz Monastery, Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal. Other names for Afonso were Affonso I "the Conqueror" King of Portugal and the Algarves, Afonso Henriques King of Portugal, Alfonso I King of Portugal, and Henriquez I King of Portugal.

Research Notes: First king of Portugal.

From Wikipedia - Afonso I of Portugal :

Afonso I (English Alphonzo or Alphonse), more commonly known as Afonso Henriques (pronounced [?'fõsu ?'?ik??] ), or also Affonso (Archaic Portuguese), Alfonso or Alphonso (Portuguese-Galician ) or Alphonsus (Latin version), (Viseu , 1109 , traditionally July 25 - Coimbra , 1185 December 6 ), also known as the Conqueror (Port. o Conquistador), was the first King of Portugal , declaring his independence from León .


Life
Afonso I was the son of Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal and Teresa of León , the illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of Castile and León . He was proclaimed King on July 26 , 1139 , immediately after the Battle of Ourique , and died on December 6 , 1185 in Coimbra .

At the end of the 11th century , the Iberian Peninsula political agenda was mostly concerned with the Reconquista , the driving out of the Muslim successor-states to the Caliphate of Cordoba after its collapse. With European military aristocracies focused on the Crusades , Alfonso VI called for the help of the French nobility to deal with the Moors . In exchange, he was to give the hands of his daughters in wedlock to the leaders of the expedition and bestow royal privileges to the others. Thus, the royal heiress Urraca of Castile wedded Raymond of Burgundy , younger son of the Count of Burgundy , and her half-sister, princess Teresa of León , wedded his cousin, another French crusader, Henry of Burgundy , younger brother of the Duke of Burgundy . Henry was made Count of Portugal, a burdensome county south of Galicia , where Moorish incursions and attacks were to be expected. With his wife Teresa as co-ruler of Portugal, Henry withstood the ordeal and held the lands for his father-in-law.

From this wedlock several sons were born, but only one, Afonso Henriques (meaning "Afonso son of Henry") thrived. The boy, probably born around 1109, followed his father as Count of Portugal in 1112 , under the tutelage of his mother. The relations between Teresa and her son Afonso proved difficult. Only eleven years old, Afonso already had his own political ideas, greatly different from his mother's. In 1120 , the young prince took the side of the archbishop of Braga , a political foe of Teresa, and both were exiled by her orders. Afonso spent the next years away from his own county , under the watch of the bishop. In 1122 Afonso became fourteen, the adult age in the 12th century . He made himself a knight on his own account in the Cathedral of Zamora , raised an army , and proceeded to take control of his lands. Near Guimarães , at the Battle of São Mamede (1128 ) he overcame the troops under his mother's lover and ally Count Fernando Peres de Trava of Galicia , making her his prisoner and exiling her forever to a monastery in León . Thus the possibility of incorporating Portugal into a Kingdom of Galicia was eliminated and Afonso become sole ruler (Duke of Portugal) after demands for independence from the county's people, church and nobles. He also vanquished Alfonso VII of Castile and León , another of his mother's allies, and thus freed the county from political dependence on the crown of León and Castile . On April 6 , 1129 , Afonso Henriques dictated the writ in which he proclaimed himself Prince of Portugal.

...In 1169 , Afonso was disabled in an engagement near Badajoz by a fall from his horse , and made prisoner by the soldiers of the king of León. Portugal was obliged to surrender as his ransom almost all the conquests Afonso had made in Galicia in the previous years.

In 1179 the privileges and favours given to the Roman Catholic Church were compensated. In the papal bull Manifestis Probatum , Pope Alexander III acknowledged Afonso as King and Portugal as an independent land with the right to conquer lands from the Moors. With this papal blessing, Portugal was at last secured as a country and safe from any Castilian attempts at annexation.

In 1184 , in spite of his great age, he still had sufficient energy to relieve his son Sancho, who was besieged in Santarém by the Moors. He died shortly after, on December 6 , 1185 .

The Portuguese revere him as a hero, both on account of his personal character and as the founder of their nation . There are stories that it would take 10 men to carry his sword, and that Afonso would want to engage other monarchs in personal combat, but no one would dare accept his challenge.



Afonso married Maud, of Savoy,169 daughter of Amadeus III, Count of Savoy, Maurienne and Turin and Mathilde, Comtesse d'Albon, before Jun 1146 in Chambéry, Savoie, France. Maud was born in 1125 in <Chambéry, Savoie>, France, died on 4 Nov 1158 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal at age 33, and was buried in Igreja Santa Cruz, Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal. Other names for Maud were Mafalda of Savoy, Mahaut of Savoy, Mathilda of Savoy, and Matilde Countess of Savoy.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots has d. 1157

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Maud of Savoy :

Maud of Savoy (1125 -1158 ), also known as Mafalda, Mahaut or Matilda (in Portuguese always as Mafalda),was the first queen of Portugal. She was Queen consort of Portugal through her marriage to King Afonso I of Portugal (of the House of Burgundy ; first king of Portugal ) in 1146 .
She was the second or third daughter of Amadeus III of Savoy , Count of Savoy and Maurienne , and Mahaut of Albon (the sister of Guigues IV, Comte d'Albon , "le Dauphin").


Afonso's and Maud descendants
Henrique (died 1147 ).
Mafalda, Princess of Portugal (1148 -c.1160 ).
Urraca, princess of Portugal (1151 -1188 ), married to King Ferdinand II of León .
Sancho I, King of Portugal (1154 -1212 ), married to Dulce Berenguer of Barcelona , Princess of Aragon (daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona and Queen Petronila of Aragon ).
Teresa, Princess of Portugal (1157 -1218 ), married to Philip I of Flanders and next to Eudes III of Burgundy .
João (?-?).
Sancha (?-?).


Children from this marriage were:

+ 148 F    i. Urraca, of Portugal 170 was born about 1150 in <Coimbra, Coimbra>, Portugal and died on 16 Oct 1188 in Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain about age 38.

+ 149 M    ii. Sancho I, King of Portugal was born on 11 Nov 1154 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal and died on 26 Mar 1212 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal at age 57.

107. InfantaSancha (Urraca, of Castile, Queen of Castile and Léon65, Constance, of Burgundy33, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born before 1095.

108. Alfonso VII, King of Castile and Léon 121 (Urraca, of Castile, Queen of Castile and Léon65, Constance, of Burgundy33, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 1 Mar 1105 in Toledo, Castile, Spain, died on 21 Aug 1157 in La Fresneda, Teruel, Aragon, Spain at age 52, and was buried in Catedral De Toledo, Toledo, Castile. Other names for Alfonso were Alfonso Raimundez, Alfonso VII of Léon and Castile, Alfonso VII Emperor of Spain, and Alfonso VII "Pierre-Raimund" King of Castile and Leon and Galicia.

Death Notes: FamilySearch has d. in La Fresneda, Teruel, Aragon. Wikipedia (?) has Sierra Morena.

Research Notes: Second husband of Berenguela of Barcelona.

From Wikipedia - Alfonso VII of León and Castile :
Alfonso VII (1 March 1105 - 21 August 1157 ), called the Emperor, became the King of Galicia in 1111 and King of León and Castile in 1126. He was crowned "Emperor of All the Spains " in 1135. He was the son of Urraca of León and Raymond of Burgundy , the first of the House of Burgundy to rule in Hispania .

Alfonso was a dignified and somewhat enigmatic figure. His rule was characterised by the renewed supremacy of the western kingdoms of Christian Hispania over the eastern (Navarre and Aragón ) after the reign of Alfonso the Battler . He also sought to make the imperial title meaningful in practice, though his attempts to rule over both Christian and Muslim populations was even less successful. His hegemonic intentions never saw fruition, however. During his tenure, Portugal became de facto independent, in 1128, and was recognized as de jure independent, in 1143. He was a patron of poets, including, probably, the troubadour Marcabru .

Succession to three kingdoms
In 1111, Diego Gelmírez , Bishop of Compostela , and the count of Traba crowned Alfonso King of Galicia in the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela . He was but a child at the time, but his mother had already (1109) succeeded to the united throne of León-Castile-Galicia and desired to assure her son's prospects and groom him for his eventual succession. By 1125 he had inherited the formerly Muslim Kingdom of Toledo . On 10 March 1126 , after the death of his mother, he was crowned in León and immediately began the recovery of the Kingdom of Castile , which was then under the domination of Alfonso the Battler. By the Peace of Támara of 1127, the Battler recognised Alfonso VII of Castile. The territory in the far east of his dominion, however, had gained much independence during the rule of his mother and experienced many rebellions. After his recognition in Castile, Alfonso fought to curb the autonomy of the local barons.

When Alfonso the Battler, King of Navarre and Aragón , died without descendants in 1134, he willed his kingdom to the military orders . The aristocracy of both kingdoms did not accept this and García Ramírez , Count of Monzón was elected in Navarre while Alfonso pretended to the throne of Aragón. The nobles chose another candidate in the dead king's brother, Ramiro II . Alfonso responded by occupying La Rioja , conquering Zaragoza , and governing both realms in unison. From this point, the arms of Zaragoza began to appear in those of León.

In several skirmishes, he defeated the joint Navarro-Aragonese army and put the kingdoms to vassalage. He had the strong support of the lords north of the Pyrenees , who held lands as far as the River Rhône . In the end, however, the combined forces of the Navarre and Aragón were too much for his control. At this time, he helped Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona , in his wars with the other Catalan counties to unite the old Marca Hispanica .

Imperial rule
A vague tradition had always assigned the title of emperor to the sovereign who held León. Sancho the Great considered the city the imperiale culmen and minted coins with the inscription Imperator totius Hispaniae after being crowned in it. Such a sovereign was considered the most direct representative of the Visigothic kings, who had been themselves the representatives of the Roman Empire . But though appearing in charters, and claimed by Alfonso VI of León and Alfonso the Battler , the title had been little more than a flourish of rhetoric.

In 1135, Alfonso was crowned "Emperor of All the Spains" in the Cathedral of León . By this, he probably wished to assert his authority over the entire peninsula and his absolute leadership of the Reconquista . He appears to have striven for the formation of a national unity which Hispania had never possessed since the fall of the Visigothic kingdom. The elements he had to deal with could not be welded together. The weakness of Aragon enabled him to make his superiority effective, although Afonso I of Portugal never recognised him as liege , thereby affirming Portugal's independence. In 1143, he himself recognised this status quo and consented to the marriage of Petronila of Aragon with Ramon Berenguer IV , a union which combined Aragon and Catalonia into the Crown of Aragon .

Family
In November 1128, he married Berenguela , daughter of Ramon Berenguer III. She died in 1149. Their children were:
Sancho III of Castile (1134-1158)
Ramon, living 1136, died in infancy
Ferdinand II of León (1137-1188)
Constance (c.1138-1160), married Louis VII of France
Sancha (c.1139-1179), married Sancho VI of Navarre
García (c.1142-1145/6)
Alfonso (c.1144-by 1149)
In 1152, Alfonso married Richeza of Poland , the daughter of Ladislaus II the Exile . They had:
Ferdinand, (1153-1157)
Sancha (1155-1208), the wife of Alfonso II of Aragón .

Alfonso also had two mistresses, having children by both. By an Asturian noblewoman named Guntroda Pérez , he had an illegitimate daughter, Urraca (1132-1164), who married García Ramírez of Navarre , the mother retiring to a convent in 1133. Later in his reign, he formed a liaison with Urraca Fernández, widow of count Rodrigo Martínez and daughter of Fernando García of Hita, an apparent grandson of García Sánchez III of Navarre , having a daughter Stephanie 'the Unfortunate' (1148-1180), who was killed by her jealous husband, Fernan Ruiz de Castro.

Noted events in his life were:

• King of Galicia: 1111-1157, Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela.

• King of León and Castile: 10 Mar 1126-21 Aug 1157.

• Emperor of All the Spains: 1135-1157, Cathedral of Léon.

Alfonso married Berenguela, of Barcelona,171 daughter of Raymond III Berenger, Count of Barcelona and Dulce Aldonza Milhaud, in Nov 1128. Berenguela was born about 1116 in <Barcelona, Aragon>, Spain and died on 3 Feb 1149 in Palencia, Léon, Spain about age 33. Another name for Berenguela was Berenguela Raimundo de Barcelona.

Death Notes: FamilySearch has d. 2 Feb 1148/1149


Children from this marriage were:

+ 150 M    i. Sancho III, of Castile 172 was born in 1134 and died on 30 Aug 1158 at age 24.

+ 151 M    ii. Fernando II, King of Léon 173 was born in 1137 in Toledo, Castile, Spain and died on 22 Jan 1188 in Benavente, Zamora, Castile, Spain at age 51.

+ 152 F    iii. Sancha was born in 1137 and died in 1179 at age 42.

+ 153 F    iv. Constance was born in 1141 and died in 1160 at age 19.

109. Alberic I, Count of Dammartin 72 (Aelis de Dammartin66, Hugues de Dammartin, Count of Dammartin34, Constance Capet18, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1110 in <Dammartin, Seine-et-Marne>, France and died in 1183 about age 73.

Alberic married Joan Basset 41 before 1150. Joan was born about 1114 in <Wellingford, Oxfordshire>, England.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 154 M    i. Albri de Luzarches, Count of Dammartin 174 was born about 1135 in <Dammartin, Seine-et-Marne>, France, died on 19 Sep 1200 in London, Middlesex, England about age 65, and was buried in Abbaye de Jumieges, Jumieges, Seine-Maritime, France.

110. Sir Nigell FitzIvo, 1st Baron of Halton 123 (Emme, de Bretagne67, Geoffrey, de Bretagne35, Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1042 in <Cotentin, Normandy, France> and died about 1080 about age 38. Other names for Nigell were Nigel of Cotentin and Nigell of Chester.

Birth Notes: Another source has b. abt 1065

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Barons of Halton :

1 Nigel of Cotentin
(c. 1070-1080)
He was also the hereditary Constable of Chester. In 1077 he fought against the Welsh at the Battle of Rhuddlan .[2] It is almost certain that he built a motte-and-bailey castle on Halton Hill but nothing remains of it today.[3]

Noted events in his life were:

• Hereditary Constable of Chester:

• Baron of Halton: Cir 1070-1080.

• Fought: against the Welsh at the Battle of Rhuddlan, 1077.

Nigell married someone.

His children were:

+ 155 M    i. William FitzNigell, 2nd Baron of Halton 175 was born in 1085 in Halton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, died in 1153 at age 68, and was buried in Chester, Cheshire, England.

+ 156 M    ii. John FitzNigell 176 was born in 1090 in Knaresborough, West Riding, Yorkshire, England and died in 1138 at age 48.

111. Acarius Fitz Bardolph, of Rafenswad 124 (Bardolph, Lord of Ravenswath68, Eudes, Comté de Bretagne36, Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died in 1161 in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England. Another name for Acarius was Akaris of Ravensworth.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/2298.htm :
Akaris, or Acarius Fitz Bardolph, who founded the Abbey of Fors (5 Stephen, A.D. 1140) and granted the original site of Jervaulx to the Suvignian monds at York. He also gave a charter to the Priory of St. Andrews, and lands and tenths in Rafenswad (Ravenswath), to which gifts. --"Hen. fit. Hervei, and Conan d'Ask" were witnesses. [Marrig. Charters, Coll. Top. Et. Genealogy III. 114] He died in 1161 and left two sons, Herveus and Walter.

~ Irish Pedigrees: Or, the Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation,
p. 104

Acarius married someone.

His child was:

+ 157 M    i. Hervey, of Ravensworth 177 was born in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died about 1184 in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

112. Ranulph II, Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy 126 (Alice, of Normandy69, Richard III, Duke of Normandy37, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1048 in <Normandy, France> and died after Apr 1089. Other names for Ranulph were Ranulf de Briquessart, Ranulf de Gernon Viscomte de Bessin, and Ranulf de Meschines Vicomte de Bayeux.

Research Notes: Adult by 1066

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132B-25
--------
From Wikipedia - Ranulf de Briquessart :

Ranulf de Briquessart[1] or Ranulf the Viscount (died c. 1089 or soon after) was an 11th century Norman magnate and viscount . Ranulf's family were connected to the House of Normandy by marriage, and, besides Odo , bishop of Bayeux , was the most powerful magnate in the Bessin region.[2] He married Margaret, daughter of Richard Goz, viscount of the Avranchin , whose son and successor Hugh d'Avranches became Earl of Chester in England c. 1070.[3]

Ranulf is probably the "Ranulf the viscount" who witnessed a charter of William , Duke of Normandy , at Caen on 17 June 1066.[4] Ranulf helped preside over a judgement in the curia of King William (as duke) in 1076 in which a disputed mill was awarded to the Abbey of Mont St. Michael .[5] On 14 July 1080 he witnessed a charter to the Abbey of Lessay (in the diocese of Coutances ), another in the same year addressed to Remigius de Fécamp bishop of Lincoln in favour of the Abbey of Préaux .[6] and one more in the same period, 1079 x 1082, to the Abbey of St Stephen of Caen .[7] His name is attached to a memorandum in 1085, and on 24 April 1089 he witnessed a confirmation of Robert Curthose , Duke of Normandy and Count of Maine to St Mary of Bayeaux, where he appears below his son in the witness list.[8]

He probably died sometime after this. His son Ranulf le Meschin became ruler of Cumberland and later Earl of Chester.[9] The Durham Liber Vitae , c. 1098 x 1120, shows that his eldest son was one Richard, who died in youth, and that he had another son named William.[10] He also had a daughter called Agnes, who later married Robert de Grandmesnil (died 1136).[9]

Noted events in his life were:

• Adult: by 1066.

• Living: 1089.

Ranulph married Maud d'Avranches,178 daughter of Richard le Goz, Viscomte d'Avranches and Emma de Conteville, about 1069 in Avranches, Normandy, France. Maud was born about 1054 in <Avranches, Normandy, France>. Other names for Maud were Margaret d'Avranches and Maud de Abrincis.

Research Notes: Sister of Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132B-25 (Ranulph II)


Children from this marriage were:

+ 158 M    i. Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester 179 was born about 1070 in <Briquessart, Livry, France>, died on 17 Jan 1129 in Chester, Cheshire, England about age 59, and was buried in St Werburgh, Chester, Cheshire, England.

+ 159 M    ii. William le Meschin, Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire 180 was born about 1100 in <Gernon Castle, Normandy, France>.

113. Raymond, of Burgundy, Count of Amous 120 (Guillaume I de Bourgogne70, Adelais, de Normandie38, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1060 in <Dijon>, France and died on 26 Mar 1107 in Grajal do Campos, Léon, Spain about age 47. Other names for Raymond were Raimundo of Burgundy and Raymond de Bourgogne.

Birth Notes: FamilySearch has b. abt 1065

Death Notes: Wikipedia has d. September 1107. FamilySearch has d. 24 Mar 1107.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Raymond of Burgundy :

Raymond of Burgundy (Spanish and Portuguese : Raimundo) was the fourth son of William I, Count of Burgundy and was Count of Amous . He came to the Iberian Peninsula for the first time during the period 1086-1087 with Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy . He came for the second time (1090) to marry Urraca of Castile , eventual heiress of Alfonso VI of Castile , King of León and Castile .
He came with his cousin Henry of Burgundy , who married the other daughter of Alfonso VI, Teresa of León (or Portugal ). By his marriage Raymond received the County of Galicia , the County of Portugal and the County of Coimbra . The last two were later offered to Henry of Burgundy, father of the first Portuguese King Afonso I Henriques of Portugal .

He was succeeded by his son:
Alfonso VII of Castile and Leon (1104/1105-1157)

Raymond married Urraca, of Castile, Queen of Castile and Léon,71 daughter of Alfonso VI "the Brave", of Castile, King of Castile and Leon and Constance, of Burgundy, about 1087 in Toledo, Castile, Spain. Urraca was born about 1082 in <Burgos, Castile>, Spain and died on 8 Mar 1126 in Saldana, Palencia, Spain about age 44. Other names for Urraca were Urraca of Léon, Urraca I Queen of Léon and Castile, and Urraca Alfonsez of Castile and Léon.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Urraca of León and Castile :

Urraca of León (1078 - March 8 , 1126 ) was Queen of León and Castile from 1109 to her death. She was the first woman ever to reign in a western European monarchy. Urraca was the daughter of Alfonso VI of León by his second wife, Constance of Burgundy . She became heiress to her father's kingdom after her only brother was killed in the Battle of Uclés (1108) .
In childhood, she was betrothed to and later married Raymond of Burgundy who died in September 1107. They had two children: the Infante Alfonso Raimúndez (born 1104) and the Infanta Sancha (born before 1095). The widow Urraca was now ruler of Galicia, and as She her father's only surviving legitimate child, she could claim to be heiress of the reign of Castile. King Alfonso VI of León selected the king of Navarre and Aragon, Alfonso I of Aragon as her husband. They had hoped for an alliance that would safeguard the kingdom, since Alfonso was renowned as a great warrior. However, the marriage proved barren and turned exceedingly bitter. According to the chronicler Ibn al-Athir , Alfonso once remarked that "a real soldier lives with men, not with women".

Urraca and Alfonso of Aragon were also second cousins, and Bernard, Archbishop of Toledo , objected to the marriage on these grounds and condemned it as consanguineous . Nevertheless, Urraca and Alfonso were married in October 1109 in Monzón . Their inability to produce a child created a rift, and Urraca accused Alfonso of being physically abusive to her. The royal couple were soon separated. By October of 1110 or 1111, her supporters fought a battle against Alfonso's forces at Candespina , in which her premier nobleman and former aspirant to her hand, count Gómez González , was killed. A further defeat was inflicted at Viadangos , at which Pedro Froilaz de Traba was captured. Their marriage was annulled in 1114. Urraca never remarried, though she took as lover another powerful nobleman, count Pedro González de Lara.

Urraca's reign was disturbed by strife among the powerful nobles and especially by constant warfare with her husband who had seized her lands. Another thorn on her side was her brother-in-law, Henry , the husband of her half-sister Teresa of Leon . He alternatively allied with Alfonso I of Aragon , then betrayed Alfonso for a better offer from Urraca's court. After Henry's death in 1112, his widow, Teresa, still contested ownership of lands with Urraca. With the aid of her son, Alfonso Raimúndez, Urraca was able to win back much of her domain and ruled successfully for many years.
According to the Chronicon Compostellanum , Urraca died in childbirth in 1126. The supposed father was her lover, Count Pedro González of Lara. However the author of the chronicles was openly hostile to the adulterous queen, and the historian Reilly notes that a pregnancy was unlikely at the queen's age of 48. She was succeeded by her legitimate son, Alfonso VII .

Illegitimate children
Besides her two legitimate children by Raymond of Burgundy, Urraca also had an illegitimate son by her lover, Pedro González de Lara. She recognized their son, Fernando Perez Furtado , in 1123.

Noted events in her life were:

• Queen of Léon and Castile: 1109-1126.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 65)

114. Ermentrude, of Burgundy 128 (Guillaume I de Bourgogne70, Adelais, de Normandie38, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1060 in Burgundy, France and died after 8 Mar 1105.

Ermentrude married Thierry I, Count of Montbéliard & Bar-le-Duc,181 son of Louis, Count of Montbéliard and Sophia, Countess of Bar-le-Duc, in 1076. Thierry was born about 1045 in <Bar-le-Duc, Meuse>, France and died on 2 Jan 1105 about age 60. Another name for Thierry was Dietrich I Count of Montbéliard & Bar-le-Duc.

Research Notes: Count of Bar-le-Duc by right of his wife.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 160 M    i. Renaud I, Count of Mousson, Count of Bar-le-Duc 182 was born about 1077 in Bar-le-Duc, Meuse, France and died on 10 Mar 1149 about age 72.

115. Gisele, of Burgundy 129 (Guillaume I de Bourgogne70, Adelais, de Normandie38, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1070 in <Bourgogne, Champagne, France> and died after 1133. Other names for Gisele were Gille de Bourgogne and Gisela de Bourgogne.

Birth Notes: FamilySearch has b. abt 1060 in Bourgogne

Death Notes: FamilySearch has d. after 1133

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 101-24 (Louis VI) and line 274A-24 (Humbert II).

Gisele married Humbert II "Le Renforcé", Count of Maurienne and Savoy,183 son of Amadeus II, Count of Maurienne and Savoy, Margrave of Susa and Jeanne, of Geneva, about 1090. Humbert was born about 1062 in <Savoie>, France, died on 14 Oct 1103 about age 41, and was buried on 19 Oct 1103.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 274A-24 (new to 8th edition) and line 101-24 (Louis VI)

Noted events in his life were:

• Marquis of Turin:

Children from this marriage were:

+ 161 F    i. Adelaide, of Savoy 184 was born about 1092 and died on 1 Aug 1154 about age 62.

+ 162 M    ii. Amadeus III, Count of Savoy, Maurienne and Turin 185 was born about 1095 in <Savoie>, France and died on 30 Aug 1148 in Cyprus about age 53.

116. Sibylle, of Burgundy-Ivrea 113 (Guillaume I de Bourgogne70, Adelais, de Normandie38, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died after 1103. Another name for Sibylle was Matilda of Burgundy-Ivrea.

Sibylle married Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy,67 son of Henry, of Burgundy and < >, [Not Sibylle of Barcelona], in 1080. Eudes was born about 1058 and died on 23 Mar 1103 in Cilicia about age 45. Other names for Eudes were Eudes I "the Red" of Burgundy and Eudes I Borel of Burgundy.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy :

Eudes I, surnamed Borel and called the Red, (1058-23 March 1103 ) was Duke of Burgundy between 1079 and 1103. Eudes was the second son of Henry of Burgundy and grandson of Robert I . He became the duke following the abdication of his older brother, Hugh I, who retired to become a Benedictine monk. Eudes married Sibylla of Burgundy (1065 - 1101), daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy .

They had:
Florine of Burgundy 1083-1097
Helie of Burgundy 1080-1141 wife of Bertrand of Toulouse and William III of Ponthieu
Hugh II of Burgundy
Henry d.1131

An interesting incident is reported of this robber baron by an eyewitness, Eadmer , biographer of Anselm of Canterbury . While Saint Anselm was progressing through Eudes's territory on his way to Rome in 1097, the bandit, expecting great treasure in the archbishop's retinue, prepared to ambush and loot it. Coming upon the prelate's train, the duke asked for the archbishop, whom they had not found. Anselm promptly came forward and took the duke by surprise, saying "My lord duke, suffer me to embrace thee." The flabbergasted duke immediately allowed the bishop to embrace him and offered himself as Anselm's humble servant.

He was a participant in the ill-fated Crusade of 1101 .

Noted events in his life were:

• Duke of Burgundy: 1079-1103.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 59)

117. Judith, of Lens 130 (Adelaide, of Normandy, Countess of Aumale72, Robert I, Duke of Normandy39, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1054 in <Lens, Artois>, France. Another name for Judith was Judith of Boulogne.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 130-25, also 98A-23. From note for Line 148-22 (after 22. Lambert of Boulogne): "Judith of Lens (Gen. 23 in previous editions) appears to have been Adelaide's child by her first marriage to Enguerrand II. See Judith of Lens (130-25, 98A-23) for her descendants.)

Here father was previously thought to be Lambert II, Count of Lens (e.g., in Magna Charta Barons, p. 81).

Judith married Waltheof II, Earl of Northumberland,186 son of Sigurd, Earl of Northumberland and Aelfflaed, of Bernicia, in 1070 in Artois, France. Waltheof was born in 1050, died on 31 May 1076 in Winchester, (Hampshire), England at age 26, and was buried in Chapter House of Croyland Abbey, Winchester, Hampshire, England.

Death Notes: Beheaded

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria :

Waltheof (1050 -31 May 1076 ), Earl of Northumbria and last of the Anglo-Saxon earls . He was the only English aristocrat to be formally executed during the reign of William I . He was reputed for his physical strength but was weak and unreliable in character.

Early Life
He was the second son of Siward, Earl of Northumbria . His mother was Aelfflaed, daughter of Ealdred, Earl of Bernicia , son of Uhtred, Earl of Northumbria . In 1054, Waltheof's brother, Osbearn, who was much older than him, was killed in battle, making Waltheof his father's heir. Siward himself died in 1055, and Waltheof being far too young to succeed as Earl of Northumbria, King Edward appointed Tostig Godwinson to the earldom.

He was said to be devout and charitable and was probably educated for a monastic life. In fact, around 1065 he became an earl, governing Northamptonshire and Huntingdonshire . Following the Battle of Hastings he submitted to William and was allowed to keep his pre-Conquest title and possessions. He remained at William's court until 1068.

First revolt
When Sweyn II invaded Northern England in 1069 Waltheof and Edgar Ætheling joined the Danes and took part in the attack on York . He would again make a fresh submission to William after the departure of the invaders in 1070. He was restored to his earldom, and went on to marry William's niece, Judith of Lens . In 1072, he was appointed Earl of Northampton .

The Domesday Book mentions Waltheof ("Walleff"); "'In Hallam ("Halun"), one manor with its sixteen hamlets, there are twenty-nine carucates [~14 km²] to be taxed. There Earl Waltheof had an "Aula" [hall or court]. There may have been about twenty ploughs. This land Roger de Busli holds of the Countess Judith." (Hallam, or Hallamshire , is now part of the city of Sheffield .

In 1072, William expelled Gospatric from the earldom of Northumbria. Gospatric was Waltheof's cousin and had taken part in the attack on York with him, but like Waltheof, had been pardoned by William. Gospatric fled into exile and William appointed Waltheof as the new earl.

Waltheof had many enemies in the north. Amongst them were members of a family who had killed Waltheof's maternal great-grandfather, Uchtred the Bold , and his grandfather Ealdred . This was part of a long-running blood feud. In 1074, Waltheof moved against the family by sending his retainers to ambush them, succeeding in killing the two eldest of four brothers.

Second revolt and death
In 1075 Waltheof joined the Revolt of the Earls against William. His motives for taking part in the revolt are unclear, as is the depth of his involvement. However he repented, confessing his guilt first to Archbishop Lanfranc , and then in person to William, who was at the time in Normandy . He returned to England with William but was arrested, brought twice before the king's court and sentenced to death.

He spent almost a year in confinement before being beheaded on May 31 , 1076 at St. Giles's Hill , near Winchester . He was said to have spent the months of his captivity in prayer and fasting. Many people believed in his innocence and were surprised when the execution was carried out. His body was initially thrown in a ditch, but was later retrieved and was buried in the chapter house of Croyland Abbey .

Family and children
In 1070 he married Judith of Lens , daughter of Lambert II, Count of Lens and Adelaide of Normandy , Countess of Aumale . They had three daughters, the eldest of whom, Maud , brought the earldom of Huntingdon to her second husband, David I of Scotland , and another of whom, Adelise, married the Anglo-Norman noble Raoul III of Tosny .

One of Waltheof's grandsons was Waltheof (d. 1159), abbot of Melrose .

Noted events in his life were:

• Earl of Northampton:

Children from this marriage were:

+ 163 F    i. Maud, of Huntingdon 187 was born about 1074 and died in 1131 about age 57.

+ 164 F    ii. Alice Huntingdon 188 was born about 1085 in <Flamsted, Hertfordshire>, England and died after 1126.

118. Sybil, of Anjou 133 (Fulk V "the Young", Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem73, Fulk IV "le Réchin", Count of Anjou40, Ermengarde, of Anjou21, Fulk III "the Black", of Maine, Count of Anjou9, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1112 in <Anjou, France> and died in 1165 about age 53. Another name for Sybil was Sibylla of Anjou.

Research Notes: Second wife of Thierry I of Lorraine (also known as Dietrich I, Count of Alsace).

From Wikipedia - Sibylla of Anjou :

Sibylla of Anjou (c. 1112-1165) was a daughter of Fulk V of Anjou and Ermengarde of Maine , and wife of William Clito and Thierry, Count of Flanders .

In 1123 Sibylla married William Clito, son of the Norman Robert Curthose and future Count of Flanders . Sibylla brought the County of Maine to this marriage, which was annulled in 1124 on grounds of consanguinity . The annulment was made by Pope Honorius II upon request from Henry I of England , William's uncle; Fulk opposed it and did not consent until Honorius excommunicated him and placed an interdict over Anjou . Sibylla then accompanied her widower father to the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem , where he married Melisende , the heiress of the kingdom, and became king himself in 1131. In 1139 she married Thierry, Count of Flanders , who had arrived on his first pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

She returned to Flanders with her new husband, and during his absence on the Second Crusade the pregnant Sibylla acted as regent of the county. Baldwin IV, Count of Hainaut took the opportunity to attack Flanders, but Sibylla led a counter-attack and pillaged Hainaut . In response Baldwin ravaged Artois . The archbishop of Reims intervened and a truce was signed, but Thierry took vengeance on Baldwin when he returned in 1149.

In 1157 she travelled with Thierry on his third pilgrimage, but after arriving in Jerusalem she separated from her husband and refused to return home with him. She became a nun at the convent of St. Lazarus in Bethany , where her step-aunt, Ioveta of Bethany , was abbess. Ioveta and Sibylla supported Queen Melisende and held some influence over the church, and supported the election of Amalric of Nesle as Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem over a number of other candidates. Sibylla died in Bethany in 1165.

With Thierry she had six children:
Philip , Count of Flanders
Matthew , Count of Boulogne , married Marie of Boulogne
Margaret , Countess of Flanders and Hainaut, married Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut
Gertrude
Matilda
Peter

Sybil married Thierry I, of Lorraine, Count of Flanders,100 son of Thierry II, Duke of Lorraine and Gertrude, of Flanders, in 1131. Thierry was born about 1099 and died on 17 Jan 1168 about age 69. Other names for Thierry were Dietrich I of Lorraine, Count of Alsace, Thierry of Alsace, and Thierry Count of Flanders.

Research Notes: Youngest son of Thierry II, Duke of Lorraine.

From Wikipedia - Thierry, Count of Flanders :

Thierry of Alsace (Dietrich) (c. 1099 - January 17 , 1168 ), in Flanders known as Diederik van den Elzas, was count of Flanders from 1128 to 1168. He was the youngest son of Duke Thierry II of Lorraine and Gertrude of Flanders (daughter of Robert I of Flanders ). With a record of four campaigns in the Levant and Africa (including participation in the Second Crusade , the failed 1157-1158 siege of the Syrian city Shaizar , and the 1164 invasion of Egypt ), he had a rare and distinguished record of commitment to crusading.

Life
After the murder of his cousin Charles the Good in 1127, Thierry claimed the county of Flanders as grandson of Robert I, but William Clito became count instead with the support of King Louis VI of France . William's politics and attitude towards the autonomy of Flanders made him unpopular, and by the end of the year Bruges , Ghent , Lille , and Saint-Omer recognized Thierry as a rival count. Thierry's supporters came from the Imperial faction of Flanders, and upon his arrival he engaged in battle against William.

Louis VI had Raymond of Martigné , the Archbishop of Reims , excommunicate him, and Louis himself then besieged Lille, but was forced to retire when Henry I of England , William's uncle, transferred his support to Thierry. However, Thierry was defeated at Tielt and Oostkamp and fled to Brugge. He was forced to flee Brugge as well, and went to Aalst , where he was soon under siege from William, Godfrey I of Leuven , and Louis VI. The city was about to be captured when William was found dead on July 27 , 1128 , leaving Thierry as the only claimant to the county.

Thierry set up his government in Ghent and was recognized by all the Flemish cities as well as King Henry, who had his Flemish lords in England swear fealty to him. Thierry himself swore homage to Louis VI after 1132, in order to gain the French king's support against Baldwin IV, Count of Hainaut , who had advanced his own claim on Flanders.

In 1132 his wife, Suanhilde, died, leaving only a daughter. In 1139 then went on pilgrimage to the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem , and married Sibylla of Anjou , daughter of King Fulk of Jerusalem and widow of William Clito; a very prestigious marriage.

This was the first of Thierry's four pilgrimages to the Holy Land . While there he also led a victorious expedition against Caesarea Phillippi , and fought alongside his father-in-law in an invasion of Gilead . He soon returned to Flanders to put down a revolt in the Duchy of Lower Lotharingia , ruled at the time by Godfrey III of Leuven .

Thierry went on crusade a second time in 1147 during the Second Crusade . He led the crossing of the Maeander River in Anatolia and fought at the Battla of Attalya in 1148, and after arriving in the crusader Kingdom he participated in the Council of Acre , where the ill-fated decision to attack Damascus was made.

He participated in the Siege of Damascus , led by his wife's half-brother Baldwin III of Jerusalem , and with the support of Baldwin, Louis VII of France , and Conrad III of Germany , he lay claim to Damascus; the native crusader barons preferred one of their own nobles, Guy Brisebarre, lord of Beirut , but in any case the siege was a failure and all parties returned home.

During his absence, Baldwin IV of Hainaut invaded Flanders and pillaged Artois ; Sibylla reacted strongly and had Hainaut pillaged in response. The Archbishop of Reims intervened and a treaty was signed. When Thierry returned in 1150, he took vengeance on Baldwin IV at Bouchain , with the aid of Henry I, Count of Namur and Henry II of Leez , Bishop of Liège . In the subsequent peace negotiations, Thierry gave his daughter Marguerite in marriage to Baldwin IV's son, the future Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut .

In 1156 Thierry had his eldest son married to Elizabeth of Vermandois , daughter and heiress of Raoul I of Vermandois . In 1156 he returned to the Holy Land, this time with his wife accompanying him. He participated in Baldwin III's siege of Shaizar , but the fortress remained in Muslim hands when a dispute arose between Thierry and Raynald of Chatillon over who would possess it should it be captured. He returned to Flanders 1159 without Sibylla, who remained behind to become a nun at the convent of St. Lazarus in Bethany . Their son Philip had ruled the county in their absence, and he remained co-count after Thierry's return.

In 1164 Thierry returned once more to the Holy Land. He accompanied King Amalric I , another half-brother of Sibylla, to Antioch and Tripoli . He returned home in 1166, and adopted a date palm as his seal, with a crown of laurels on the reverse.

He died on February 4, 1168, and was buried in the Abbey of Watten , between Saint-Omer and Gravelines . His rule had been moderate and peaceful; the highly developed administration of the county in later centuries first began during these years. There had also been great economic and agricultural development, and new commercial enterprises were established; Flanders' greatest territorial expansion occurred under Thierry.

Family
His first wife, Suanhilde, died in 1132, leaving only one daughter:
Laurette of Flanders , who married four times: Iwain, Count of Aalst ; Henry II, Duke of Limburg ; Raoul I of Vermandois , Count of Vermandois ; Henry IV of Luxembourg . Laurette finally retired to a nunnery, where she died in 1170.
Thierry secondly married Sibylla of Anjou , daughter of Fulk V of Anjou and Ermengarde of Maine , and widow of William Clito . Their children were:
Philip of Flanders (died 1191)
Matthew of Alsace (died 1173), married Countess Marie of Boulogne
Margaret I of Flanders (died 1194), married Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut
Gertrude of Flanders (died 1186), married Humbert III of Savoy
Matilda of Flanders, abbess of Fontevrault
Peter of Flanders (died 1176), Bishop of Cambrai

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Flanders: 1128-1168.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 94)

119. Geoffrey V Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy 134 (Fulk V "the Young", Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem73, Fulk IV "le Réchin", Count of Anjou40, Ermengarde, of Anjou21, Fulk III "the Black", of Maine, Count of Anjou9, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 24 Aug 1113 in Anjou, France, died on 7 Sep 1151 at age 38, and was buried in Le Mans, France. Other names for Geoffrey were Geoffrey V Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy and Geoffrey 'the Fair' Plantagenet Count of Anjou.

Research Notes: Second husband of Matilda.

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871913 :
'The Fair' Count of Anjou (1129-1151); founder of the Plantagenet dynasty. Geoffey's nickname derived from his physical appearance - he was said to be tall, handsome, graceful and strong. He was also known as Geoffrey Plantagenet, appearantly from the sprig of broom (genet) he wore in his hat. In 1127, aged 14, he was married to Matilda, daughter and heiress of Henry I of England and the widow of the Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. They disliked each other, but maintained an uneasy political alliance and produces three sons, Henry (the future Henry II of England), Geoffrey and William. An illegitimate son, Hamelin became the Duke of Salisbury. Geoffrey spent much of his youth imposing order on his unruly vassals, including his own brother Helias II, Count of Maine, who rebelled against him in 1131; Geoffrey captured Helias and held him prisoner in Tours, Helias died soon after his release from a disease contracted in prison. In 1135 Henry I of England died, and Matilda's cousin Stephen of Blois (RIN # 1643) seized the English throne, together with Normandy, traditionally coveted by the counts of Anjou. Geoffrey laid claim to the duchy in his wife's right. Between 1135-1138 Geoffrey launched four expeditions into Normandy, none of which achieved great success. The expedition in 1137 was striken by dysentery, and forced to return swiftly to Anjou. In 1139 Matilda invaded England, seeking to press her claim to the English throne, and Geoffrey remained in Anjou to continue the war against Normandy. The Morman barons opposed Geoffrey, not through loyalty to Stephen, who had only visited Normandy once, but out of hatred of their traditional enemy, Anjou. However, Norman morale was weakened when Matilda captured Stephen at Lincoln in 1141, and many castles surrendered to Geoffrey, leaving him in control of most of the lands between Bayeux and the Seine. In 1142 he took the Avranchin and Mortain, and in 1143 moved east of the Seine, overunning the Cotentin. He was invested as Duke of Normandy in 144 after the fall of Rouen, and Arques, the last castle opposing him, capitulated in 1145, leaving him unchallenged master of Normandy. After the conquest of Normandy, Geoffrey joined Louis VII of France in the abortive Second Crusade (1147-9), returning in 1149. In 1150 he ceded Normandy to his son Henry, who also inhereted the family claim to the English throne. Geoffrey died in 1151, and was buried in Le Mans Cathedral; founder of a great dynasty of kings through his son, Henry II of England. For more on the Second Crusade, see RIN # 1618.
!The Plantagenet Chronicles: 38-63,80,102,140,154

----

From Wikipedia - Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou :

Geoffrey (24 August 1113 - 7 September 1151), called the Handsome (French : le Bel) and Plantagenet, was the Count of Anjou , Touraine , and Maine by inheritance from 1129 and then Duke of Normandy by conquest from 1144. By his marriage to the Empress Matilda , daughter and heiress of Henry I of England , Geoffrey had a son, Henry Curtmantle , who succeeded to the English throne and founded the Plantagenet dynasty to which Geoffrey gave his nickname.

Biography
Geoffrey was the elder son of Fulk V of Anjou and Eremburga of La Flèche , heiress of Elias I of Maine . Geoffrey received his nickname for the yellow sprig of broom blossom (genêt is the French name for the genista, or broom shrub) he wore in his hat as a badge. King Henry I of England, having heard good reports on Geoffrey's talents and prowess, sent his royal legates to Anjou to negotiate a marriage between Geoffrey and his own daughter, Matilda. Consent was obtained from both parties, and on 10 June 1128 the fifteen-year-old Geoffrey was knighted in Rouen by King Henry in preparation for the wedding. Interestingly, there was no opposition to the marriage from the Church, despite the fact that Geoffrey's sister was the widow of Matilda's brother (only son of King Henry) which fact had been used to annul the marriage of another of Geoffrey's sisters to the Norman pretender William Clito .

On 17 June 1128 Geoffrey married Empress Matilda, the daughter and heiress of King Henry I of England by his first wife Edith of Scotland , and widow of Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor . The marriage was meant to seal a peace between England/Normandy and Anjou. She was eleven years older than Geoffrey, very proud of her status as an Empress (as opposed to being a mere Countess). Their marriage was a stormy one with frequent long separations, but she bore him three sons and survived him.

The year after the marriage Geoffrey's father left for Jerusalem (where he was to become king ), leaving Geoffrey behind as count of Anjou. John of Marmoutier describes Geoffrey as handsome, red-headed, jovial, and a great warrior; however, Ralph of Diceto alleges that his charm concealed his cold and selfish character.

When King Henry I died in 1135, Matilda at once entered Normandy to claim her inheritance. The border districts submitted to her, but England chose her cousin Stephen of Blois for its king, and Normandy soon followed suit. The following year, Geoffrey gave Ambrieres, Gorron, and Chatilon-sur-Colmont to Juhel de Mayenne, on condition that he help obtain the inheritance of Geoffrey's wife. In 1139 Matilda landed in England with 140 knights, where she was besieged at Arundel Castle by King Stephen. In the "Anarchy" which ensued, Stephen was captured at Lincoln in February, 1141, and imprisoned at Bristol. A legatine council of the English church held at Winchester in April 1141 declared Stephen deposed and proclaimed Matilda "Lady of the English". Stephen was subsequently released from prison and had himself recrowned on the anniversary of his first coronation.

During 1142 and 1143, Geoffrey secured all of Normandy west and south of the Seine, and, on 14 January 1144, he crossed the Seine and entered Rouen. He assumed the title of Duke of Normandy in the summer of 1144. In 1144, he founded an Augustine priory at Chateau-l'Ermitage in Anjou. Geoffrey held the duchy until 1149, when he and Matilda conjointly ceded it to their son, Henry, which cession was formally ratified by King Louis VII of France the following year.

Geoffrey also put down three baronial rebellions in Anjou, in 1129, 1135, and 1145-1151. He was often at odds with his younger brother, Elias , whom he had imprisoned until 1151. The threat of rebellion slowed his progress in Normandy, and is one reason he could not intervene in England. In 1153, the Treaty of Westminster allowed Stephen should remain King of England for life and that Henry, the son of Geoffrey and Matilda should succeed him.

Geoffrey died suddenly on September 7, 1151. According to John of Marmoutier, Geoffrey was returning from a royal council when he was stricken with fever. He arrived at Château-du-Loir , collapsed on a couch, made bequests of gifts and charities, and died. He was buried at St. Julien's Cathedral in Le Mans France. Geoffrey and Matilda's children were:
Henry II of England (1133-1189)
Geoffrey, Count of Nantes (1 June 1134 Rouen - 26 July 1158 Nantes ) died unmarried and was buried in Nantes
William X, Count of Poitou (1136-1164) died unmarried

Geoffrey also had illegitimate children by an unknown mistress (or mistresses): Hamelin ; Emme, who married Dafydd Ab Owain Gwynedd , Prince of North Wales ; and Mary, who became a nun and Abbess of Shaftesbury and who may be the poetess Marie de France . Adelaide of Angers is sometimes sourced as being the mother of Hamelin.

The first reference to Norman heraldry was in 1128, when Henry I of England knighted his son-in-law Geoffrey and granted him a badge of gold lions (or leopards ) on a blue background. (A gold lion may already have been Henry's own badge.) Henry II used two gold lions and two lions on a red background are still part of the arms of Normandy. Henry's son, Richard I , added a third lion to distinguish the arms of England.

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Anjou, Touraine and Maine: 1129-1151.

• Duke of Normandy: 1144-1151.

Geoffrey married Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou,104 daughter of Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England and Matilda, of Scotland, on 22 May 1128 in Le Mans, France. Matilda was born about 7 Feb 1102 and died on 10 Sep 1167 about age 65. Other names for Matilda were Mathilda of England, Empress Maud Countess of Anjou, and Maude of England.

Marriage Notes: Marriage date may have been 3 April 1127 (Ancestral Roots Line 1-23). Line 118-25 (Geoffrey V) has m. 22 May 1127.

Birth Notes: Ancestral Roots Line 1-23 has b. abt. 1102-1104; Line 118-25 has b. 1104.
Some other source has b. Feb 1101

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Empress Matilda :

Empress Matilda, also known as Matilda of England or Maude (c. 7 February 1102 - 10 September 1167) was the daughter and heir of King Henry I of England . Matilda and her younger brother, William Adelin , were the only legitimate children of King Henry. Her brother died young in the White ship disaster , leaving Matilda as the last heir from the paternal line of her grandfather William the Conqueror .

As a child, Matilda was betrothed and later married to Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor . From her marriage to Henry, she acquired the title Empress. The couple had no known children. When widowed, she was married to the much younger Geoffrey of Anjou , by whom she became the mother of three sons, the eldest of whom became King Henry II of England .

Matilda was the first female ruler of the Kingdom of England . However the length of her effective rule was quite brief - a few months in 1141 - and she was never crowned and failed to consolidate her rule (legally and politically). Because of this she is normally excluded from lists of English monarchs, and her rival (and cousin) Stephen of Blois is routinely listed as monarch for the period 1135-1154. Their warring rivalry for the throne led to years of unrest and civil war in England that have been called The Anarchy . She did secure her inheritance of the Duchy of Normandy - through the military feats of her husband Geoffrey - and she campaigned unstintingly for her oldest son's inheritance, living to see him ascend the throne in 1154.

(In Latin texts Matilda was sometimes called Maude . This is a modernised spelling of the Norman-French form of her name, Mahaut.)

Early life
Matilda was the firstborn of two children to Henry I of England and his wife Matilda of Scotland (also known as Edith). Her maternal grandparents were Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret of Scotland . Margaret was daughter of Edward the Exile and granddaughter of Edmund II of England . (Most historians believe Matilda was born at Winchester , but one, John Fletcher (1990), argues for the possibility of the royal palace at Sutton Courtenay in Oxfordshire .)

First marriage: Holy Roman Empress
When she was seven years old, Matilda was betrothed to Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor ; at nine, she was sent to the Holy Roman Empire (Germany) to begin training for the life of Empress consort . The royal couple were married at Worms on January 7, 1114, and Matilda accompanied her husband on tours to Rome and Tuscany . After time, the young wife of the Emperor acted as regent , mainly in Italy, in his absence[1]. Emperor Henry died in 1125. The imperial couple had no surviving offspring, but Herman of Tournai states that Matilda bore a son who lived only a short while.

Despite being popularly known by the title "Empress " from her first marriage, Matilda's right to the title was dubious. She was never crowned Holy Roman Empress by a legitimate Pope - which ceremony was normally required to achieve the title; indeed, in later years she encouraged chroniclers to believe she had been crowned by the Pope. Contemporary, she was called German Queen by her husband's bishops, while her formal title was recorded as "Queen of the Romans". Still, "Empress" was arguably an appropriate courtesy title for the wife of an Emperor who had been crowned by the Pope.

In 1120 her brother William Adelin was drowned in the disastrous wreck of the White Ship , which left Matilda as the only legitimate child of her father King Henry . Like Matilda, her cousin Stephen of Blois was a grandchild of William (the Conqueror) of Normandy ; but her paternal line made her senior in right of succession to his maternal line.

Second marriage: Countess of Anjou
Matilda returned to England a young widow, age 23, and dowager "Empress" - a status of considerable pride to her. There Henry named her his heir to both the English throne and his Duchy of Normandy . Henry saw to it that the Anglo-Norman barons (including Stephen of Blois ) were sworn (several times) to accept Matilda as ruler if Henry died without a male heir.

Henry then arranged a second marriage for Matilda; as he aimed to achieve peace between the fractious barons of Normandy and Anjou. On 17 June 1128, Matilda, aged 26, was married to Geoffrey of Anjou , aged 15, who also was Count of Maine and heir apparent to (his father) the Count of Anjou - which title he soon acquired, and by which Matilda became Countess of Anjou. It was a title she rarely used. Geoffrey called himself "Plantagenet " from the broom flower (planta genista) he adopted as his personal emblem. So Plantagenet became the dynastic name of that powerful line of English kings who descended from Matilda and Geoffrey.

Matilda's marriage with Geoffrey was troubled; there were frequent long separations, but they had three sons and she survived him. The eldest son, Henry , was born on 5 March 1133. In 1134, she nearly died in childbirth, following the birth of her second son, Geoffrey, Count of Nantes . A third son, William X, Count of Poitou , was born in 1136.

When her father died in Normandy, on 1 December 1135, Matilda was with her husband, in Anjou ; and, crucially, too far away from events rapidly unfolding in England and Normandy. Stephen of Blois rushed to England upon learning of Henry's death; in London he moved quickly to grasp the crown of England from its appointed heir.

But Matilda was game to contest Stephen in both realms; she and her husband Geoffrey entered Normandy and began military campaigns to claim her inheritance. Progress was uneven at first, but she persevered; even so, it was not until 1139 that Matilda felt secure enough in Normandy to turn her attentions to invading England and fighting Stephen directly.
In Normandy, Geoffrey secured all fiefdoms west and south of the Seine by 1143; in January 1144, he crossed the Seine and took Rouen without resistance. He assumed the title Duke of Normandy , and Matilda became Duchess of Normandy. Geoffrey and Matilda held the duchy conjointly until 1149, then ceded it to their son, Henry, which event was soon ratified by King Louis VII of France .

Struggle for throne of England
On the death of her father, Henry I, in 1135, Matilda expected to succeed to the throne of England , but her cousin, Stephen of Blois , a nephew of Henry I, usurped the throne with the support of most of the barons, breaking the oath he had previously made to defend her rights. The civil war which followed was bitter and prolonged, with neither side gaining the ascendancy for long, but it was not until 1139 that Matilda could command the military strength necessary to challenge Stephen within his own realm. Stephen's wife, the Countess of Boulogne who was also named Matilda , was the Empress's maternal cousin. During the war, Matilda's most loyal and capable supporter was her illegitimate half-brother, Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester .

Matilda's greatest triumph came in April 1141, when her forces defeated and captured King Stephen at the Battle of Lincoln . He was made a prisoner and effectively deposed.

Her advantage lasted only a few months. When she marched on London , the city was ready to welcome her and support her coronation . She used the title of Lady of the English and planned to assume the title of queen upon coronation (the custom which was followed by her grandsons, Richard and John ).[2] However, she refused the citizens' request to have their taxes halved and, because of her own arrogance [2], she found the gates of London shut and the civil war reignited on 24 June 1141. By November, Stephen was free, having been exchanged for the captured Robert of Gloucester, and a year later, the tables were turned when Matilda was besieged at Oxford but escaped to Wallingford , supposedly by fleeing across the snow-covered land in a white cape. In 1141 she had escaped Devizes in a similarly clever manner, by disguising herself as a corpse and being carried out for burial. In 1148, Matilda and Henry returned to Normandy , following the death of Robert of Gloucester, and the reconquest of that county by her husband. Upon their arrival, Geoffrey turned Normandy over to his son, and retired to his own county of Anjou .

Later life
Matilda's first son, Henry , was showing signs of becoming a successful leader. Although the civil war had been decided in Stephen's favour, his reign was troubled. In 1153, the death of his son Eustace, combined with the arrival of a military expedition led by Henry, led him to acknowledge the latter as his heir by the Treaty of Wallingford .

Matilda retired to Rouen in Normandy during her last years, where she maintained her own court and presided over the government of the duchy in the absence of Henry. She intervened in the quarrels between her eldest son Henry and her second son Geoffrey, but peace between the brothers was brief. Geoffrey rebelled against Henry twice before his sudden death in 1158. Relations between Henry and his youngest brother, William X, Count of Poitou , were more cordial, and William was given vast estates in England. Archbishop Thomas Becket refused to allow William to marry the Countess of Surrey and the young man fled to Matilda's court at Rouen. William, who was his mother's favourite child, died there in January 1164, reportedly of disappointment and sorrow. She attempted to mediate in the quarrel between her son Henry and Becket, but was unsuccessful.

Although she gave up hope of being crowned in 1141, her name always preceded that of her son Henry, even after he became king. Matilda died at Notre Dame du Pré near Rouen and was buried in the Abbey church of Bec-Hellouin, Normandy. Her body was transferred to the Rouen Cathedral in 1847; her epitaph reads: "Great by Birth, Greater by Marriage, Greatest in her Offspring: Here lies Matilda, the daughter, wife, and mother of Henry."

(Duplicate Line. See Person 97)

Geoffrey had a relationship with < >. This couple did not marry.

Their child was:

+ 165 M    i. Hamelin Plantagenet, 5th Earl of Surrey 189 was born about 1129, died on 7 May 1202 about age 73, and was buried in Chapter House, Lewes Priory, Surrey, England.

120. Vulgrin II, Comté d'Angoulême 137 (William III, Count of Angoulême74, Foulques "Taillefer", Comté d'Angoulême41, Geoffroy d'Angoulême22, Gerberge, d'Anjou10, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1108 in Angoulême, died on 16 Sep 1140 in Château de Bounteville, (France) about age 32, and was buried in Saint-Eparchius. Other names for Vulgrin were Wulgrin II Count of Angoulême and Ponce de la Marche and Bougrin Taillifer.

Birth Notes: May have been born about 1089 in Angouleme.

Death Notes: May have died on 16 Nov 1140 (burial date?).

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Wulgrin II, Count of Angoulême :

Wulgrin II (also Vulgrin or Bougrin), called Taillifer or Rudel, was the Count of Angoulême from 1120 to his death on 16 November 1140.[1] He was a son of Count William III and he married Pontia de la Marche, daughter of Roger the Poitevin and Almodis, the daughter of count Aldebert II of La Marche. They had only one son, William IV of Angoulême . After the death of his first wife, Wulgrin remarried to Amable de Châtellerault and had three children: Fulk, Geoffrey "Martel" and an unnamed daughter.

He retook Blaye from William X of Aquitaine in 1127 and reconstructed the castle there in 1140.[2]

The troubadour Jaufré Rudel may be possibly his son or his son-in-law.[2]

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Angoulême: 1118-1140.

Vulgrin married Pontia de la Marche,190 daughter of Roger "the Poitevin" Montgomery and Almodis, Countess of La Marche,. Another name for Pontia was Pontia de la Marche.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 166 M    i. William IV Taillifer, Count of Angoulême 191 died on 7 Aug 1179 in Messina, Sicily.

121. Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick 139 (Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick76, Adeline, of Meulan42, Waleran I, Count of Meulan23, Alix de Vexin11, Gauthier II Vexin, Count of Vexin6, Adèle, d'Anjou3, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1102 and died on 12 Jun 1153 about age 51.

Research Notes: Elder son of Henry de Beaumont.

From Wikipedia - Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick :

Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick (1102 - 12 June 1153 ), was the elder son of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick and Marguerite, daughter of Geoffrey II of Perche and Beatrix of Montdidier . He was also known as Roger de Newburg.

He was generally considered to have been a devout and pious man; a chronicle of the period, the Gesta Regis Stephani , speaks of him as a "man of gentle disposition". The borough of Warwick remembers him as the founder of the Hospital of S. Michael for lepers which he endowed with the tithes of Wedgnock , and other property; he also endowed the House of the Templars beyond the bridge. In the reign of Stephen he founded a priory dedicated to S. Kenned at Llangennilth, Co. Glamorgan and he attached it as a cell to the Abbey of S. Taurinus at Evreux in Normandy .


Family and children
He married 1130 Gundred de Warenne, daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois and had children:
William de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Warwick .
Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick (1153 - 12 December 1204).
Henry de Beaumont, was Dean of Salisbury in 1205.
Agnes de Beaumont, married Geoffrey de Clinton, Chamberlain to the King and son of Geoffrey de Clinton , the founder of Kenilworth Castle and Priory.
Margaret de Beaumont.
Gundred de Beaumont (c.1135-1200), married:
Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk ;
Roger de Glanville.

Noted events in his life were:

• Crusader:

Roger married Gundred de Warenne,96 daughter of William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester, before 1130. Gundred was born about 1117 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, died after 1167 in Warwickshire, England, and was buried in Kelso, Roxburgh, Scotland. Another name for Gundred was Gundrada de Warenne.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey:

Gundrada de Warenne , who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick , and second William, lord of Kendal , and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen 's garrison from Warwick Castle ;
---
From http://cybergata.com/roots/3164.htm :
Family. 157
William de Warren, earl of surrey was born about 1017. He married, Isabel or Elizabeth Vermandois, One of their children was named Gundred or Gundreda, who married, first Roger, earl of Warrick, and then to William Fitz Gilbert, who assumed the name "of Lancaster." Gundreda and William Fitz Gilbert had a son named William de Lancaster.

~A Genealogy of the Southworths (Southards)..., pg. 431-432
• Background Information. 747
The second husband of Gundreda, Countess of Warwick, was William, surnamed Lancaster, Baron of Kendal. She was the daughter of William de Warrene, the second Earl of Surrey, by Isabel de Vermandois and consequently, granddaughter to Gundreda, the fifth daughter of William, Duke of Normandy.

~Observations on the Parentage of Gundreda, p. 321
• Background Information. 141
Roger
, Earl of Warwick, married Gundred, elder daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, by Isabel/Elizabeth, widow of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan & 1st Earl of Leicester, daughter of Hugh de Crépy, Count of Vermandos. Roger died in 1153. His widow, Gundred, married, as his 2nd wife, William de Lancaster, Lord of Kendal. Gundred was living in 1166.

~ Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, Vol. XIIB, (Warwick), p. 362

Noted events in her life were:

• Living: 1166.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 89)

previous  Ninth Generation  Next



122. Renaud de Courtenay, Sire de Courtenay 141 (Ermengarde, de Nevers79, Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre44, William I, Count of Nevers24, Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1125 in <Courtenay, Loiret>, France and died about 1190 about age 65.

Renaud married Helvis, du Donjon and Corbeil.192

Research Notes: First wife of Renaud de Courtenay (the elder). Sister of Frederick (or Guy) du Donjon and Corbeil


Children from this marriage were:

+ 167 F    i. Elizabeth de Courtenay, Dame de Courtenay was born before 1150 and died after 1205.

+ 168 M    ii. Renaud de Courtenay 193 was born about 1150, died on 27 Sep 1194 about age 44, and was buried in Ford Abbey, Devonshire, England.

+ 169 F    iii. Egelina de Courtenay 194 was born about 1155 in <Colston, Nottinghamshire>, England and died about 1214 about age 59.

123. Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester 144 (Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1121 in Beaumont, France and died on 31 Aug 1190 in Durazzo, West Albania about age 69. Another name for Robert was Robert "Blanchemains" de Harcourt 3rd Earl of Leicester.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester

Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester (died 1190 ) was an English nobleman, one of the principal followers of Henry the Young King in the Revolt of 1173-1174 against his father Henry II . He is also called Robert Blanchemains (meaning "White Hands" in French ).

He was the son of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester , a staunch supporter of Henry II, and he inherited from his father large estates in England and Normandy .

When the revolt of the younger Henry broke out in April 1173 , Robert went to his castle at Breteuil in Normandy . The rebels' aim was to take control of the duchy, but Henry II himself led an army to besiege the castle; Robert fled, and the Breteuil was taken on September 25 or 26.

Robert apparently went to Flanders , where he raised a large force of mercenaries, and landed at Walton, Suffolk , on September 29 , 1173. He joined forces with Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk , and the two marched west, aiming to cut England in two across the Midlands and to relieve the king's siege of Robert's castle at Leicester . However, they were intercepted by the king's supporters and defeated in battle at Fornham , near Bury St Edmunds , on October 17 . Robert, along with his wife and many others, was taken prisoner. Henry II took away the earl's lands and titles as well.

He remained in captivity until January 1177 , well after most of the other prisoners had been released. The king was in a strong position and could afford to be merciful; not long after his release Robert's lands and titles were restored, but not his castles. All but two of his castles had been destroyed, and those two (Montsorrel in Leicestershire and Pacy in Normandy) remained in the king's hands.

Robert had little influence in the remaining years of Henry II's reign, but was restored to favor by Richard I . He carried one of the swords of state at Richard's coronation in 1189 . In 1190 Robert went on pilgrimage to Palestine , but he died in Greece on his return journey.

Family
Robert married Pernelle[1], who was either a granddaughter or great-granddaughter of Hugh de Grandmesnil . They had five children:
Robert , who succeeded his father as Earl of Leicester ;
Roger , who became Bishop of St Andrews in 1189;
William, who was a leper;
Amicia, who married Simon III de Montfort , and whose son Simon subsequently became Earl of Leicester;
Margaret, who married Saer de Quincy , later 1st Earl of Winchester .

Noted events in his life were:

• Crusader: 1179.

Robert married Petronilla de Grandmesnil,195 daughter of Hugh de Grandmesnil and Alice Beaumont, about 1155. Petronilla was born about 1134 in <Leicestershire>, England and died on 1 Apr 1212 in Leicester, Leicestershire, England about age 78. Other names for Petronilla were Pernelle de Grandmesnil, Petronella de Grentemaisnil, and Petronille de Grentmesnil.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester


Children from this marriage were:

+ 170 F    i. Margaret de Beaumont 196 was born about 1156 in <Hampshire>, England and died about 12 Jan 1235 about age 79.

+ 171 M    ii. Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester 197 died about 21 Oct 1204.

+ 172 M    iii. Roger de Beaumont, Bishop of St Andrews .

+ 173 M    iv. William de Beaumont .

+ 174 F    v. Amicia de Beaumont .

124. Hawise de Beaumont, of Leicester (Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died on 24 Apr 1197.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester

Also Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 63-26

Hawise married William FitzRobert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester, son of Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester and Mabel FitzHamon, of Gloucester, about 1150. William was born about 1128 and died on 23 Nov 1183 about age 55.

Research Notes: 2nd Earl of Gloucester, Lord of Tewkesbury and Glamorgan
2nd Earl of Gloucester, Lord of the manor of Glamorgan and of Cardiff Castle

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 123-27.
Also line 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont)


The child from this marriage was:

+ 175 F    i. Amice FitzWilliam, Countess of Gloucester 198 was born about 1160 and died on 1 Jan 1225 about age 65.

125. Isabel de Beaumont (Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester

126. Margaret de Beaumont (Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester

127. Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan 145 (Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan83, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1140 in Meulan, Normandy, France and died in Oct 1207 in Palestine about age 67.

Robert married Maud de Dunstanville,145 daughter of Rainald de Dunstanville and Beatrice FitzWilliam, in 1165 in Cornwall, England. Maud was born about 1143 in Dunstanville, Kent, England.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 176 F    i. Mabel de Beaumont 145 was born about 1168 in <Meulan, Normandy>, France and died after 1 May 1204.

128. Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick 146 (Gundred de Warenne89, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born before 1153 and died on 24 Dec 1204. Another name for Waleran was Walerian de Newburg.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots, Line 84-26, has: "d. 24 Dec. 1203 or bef. 13 Oct. 1204"

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick :

Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick (1153 - 12 December 1204 ) was the younger son of Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick and Gundred de Warrenne , daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois . He was also known as Walerian de Newburg.

After his brother 's death an impostor arose, claiming to be the deceased Earl; he gave Waleran a great deal of trouble in maintaining his claim. He does not appear to have been a great soldier, for he paid scutage money to escape military service in Wales . His position in the Court is attested by his bearing the right hand Sword of State at the Coronation of King John , 27 May 1199 .

He liberally supported the hospital of St. Michael's Hospital, Warwick and gave to the nuns of Pinley land at Claverdon , and land at Brailes to the nuns at Wroxall, Warwickshire .


Family and children
He married first to Margery, daughter of Henry d'Oily and Maud de Bohun and had children:
Henry de Beaumont, 5th Earl of Warwick , his heir.
Waleran de Beaumont of Gretham and Cotismore .
Gundred de Beaumont. She and her cousin Mabel became nuns at the Abbey of Pinley .

His second wife was Alice de Harcourt, widow of John de Limesy, Lord of Cavendish, daughter of Robert de Harcourt and had one child:
Alice de Beaumont (died before 1263), married William de Maudit , Baron of Hanslape , Chamberlain to the King. They children were:
William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick ;
Isabel de Maudit , married William de Beauchamp , Baron Emley. Their son was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick .

Waleran married Margery d'Oilly.199

Research Notes: First wife of Waleran de Beaumont

Waleran next married Alice de Harcourt,200 daughter of Robert de Harcourt, of Stanton-Harcourt, Oxfordshire and Isabel de Camville, about 1196. Alice died after 1212.

Research Notes: 2nd wife of Waleran de Beaumont; Waleran de Beaumont was her 2nd husband.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 177 F    i. Alice de Beaumont 201 died between 1246 and 1263.

129. Avice de Lancaster 148 (Gundred de Warenne89, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1155 in Cumberland, England and died on 1 Jan 1191 about age 36. Another name for Avice was Avicia de Lancaster.

Avice married Richard de Morville, of Lauder in Lauderdale,202 son of Hugh de Morville and Beatrice de Beauchamp,. Richard was born about 1143 in <Burgh-by-Sands, Cumberland, England> and died in 1189 about age 46.

Noted events in his life were:

• Constable of Scotland:

Children from this marriage were:

+ 178 F    i. Elena de Morville 202 was born about 1172 in <Kirkoswald, Cumberland, England>, died on 11 Jun 1217 about age 45, and was buried in Abbey of Dundrennan, Kirkcudbright, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland.

+ 179 M    ii. William de Morville 203 died in 1196.

130. William II de Lancaster 149 (Gundred de Warenne89, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in 1184 in Kendal, Westmoreland, England and was buried in Furness Abbey, England.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/2049.htm :
Background Information.
William de Lancaster, the second, was Steward to Henry II. He married Helewise de Stutevill, daughter of Robert de Suteville.

~Fenwick Allied Ancestry, pg. 124, Pedigree 89 726

William de Lancaster II succeeded to the barony after his father died sometime around 1170. This William died in 1184, leaving issue by Hawise, daughter of Robert de Stutvill of Lazenby, and only daughter, Hawise, who was given in marriage, by King Richard at Rouen, 20 Jul 1189, [Benedict, ii. f. 73] to Gilbert, son of Roger fitz Reinfred.

~Farrer, The Chartulary of Cockersand Abbey, Vol. I, Part II, p. 308 908

131. Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey 151 (William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne90, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died on 13 Jul 1199. Another name for Isabelle was Isabel de Warenne Countess of Surrey.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

In [Elizabeth's] second marriage, to William de Warenne, Elizabeth had three sons and two daughters (for a total of fourteen children - nine during her first marriage, and five during her second):
William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne (b. 1119 dspm 1147) whose daughter Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey married 1stly
William, Count of Boulogne (dsp), yr son of King Stephen, and married 2ndly
Hamelin Plantagenet , an illegitimate half-brother of King Henry II of England by whom she had issue, later earls of Surrey and Warenne.

Isabelle married William, of Blois, Count of Boulogne. William died in 1159.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois

Also Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 83-26 (Isabel de Warenne)

Isabelle next married Hamelin Plantagenet, 5th Earl of Surrey,189 son of Geoffrey V Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy and < >, in Apr 1164. Hamelin was born about 1129, died on 7 May 1202 about age 73, and was buried in Chapter House, Lewes Priory, Surrey, England. Other names for Hamelin were Hamelin Earl of Surrey and Hamelin de Warenne 5th Earl of Surrey.

Research Notes: Natural son of Geoffrey V (Plantagenet). Second husband of Isabel de Warenne.

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872178 :

Earl of Surrey, Count of Anjou and Maine, Viscount of Touraine and [illegitimate] half-brother of Henry II, King of England. Hamelin supported Henry II against the rebellion by his sons in 1173. In 1176, he escorted Henry's daughter Joan for her marriage to the King of Sicily. Hamelin was present at the Coronation of Richard I and was opposed to the rule of John while Richard was on crusade and later, imprisoned. In 1193, Hamelin was one of the Treasurers for the ransom of the King. Hamelin also attended the Coronation of King John in 1199. Hamelin was the benefactor of quite a number of Abbeys, Priorys and other religious communities in both England and France.
------------
From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois:

Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey married 1stly
William, Count of Boulogne (dsp), yr son of King Stephen, and married 2ndly
Hamelin Plantagenet , an illegitimate half-brother of King Henry II of England by whom she had issue, later earls of Surrey and Warenne.

From Wikipedia - Hamelin de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey :
Hamelin de Warenne[citation needed ] (Plantagenet) 1129 - May 7 , 1202 ) was an English nobleman who was prominent at the courts of the Angevin kings of England , Henry II , Richard I , and John .

He was an illegitimate son of Geoffrey of Anjou , and thus a half-brother of King Henry II , and an uncle of Richard the Lionheart and King John . His half-brother Henry gave him one of the wealthiest heiresses in England, Isabella de Warenne , in her own right Countess of Surrey. She was the widow of William of Blois . Hamelin and Isabella married in April 1164, and after the marriage he was recognized as Comte de Warenne, that being the customary designation for what more technically should be Earl of Surrey . In consequence of the marriage Hamelin took the de Warenne toponymic, as did his descendants. He and Isabella would have four children.

Warenne land in England centered around Conisbrough in Yorkshire , a location in which Hamelin built a powerful castle. He also possessed the third penny (entitlement to one third of the fines levied in the county courts) of County Surrey and held the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Normandy .

Hamelin joined in the denunciations of Thomas Becket in 1164, although after Becket's death he became a great believer in Becket's sainthood, having, the story goes, been cured of blindness by the saint's help. In 1176, he escorted his niece Joan of England to Sicily for her marriage.

He remained loyal to Henry through all the problems of the later part of the king's reign when many nobles deserted him, and continued as a close supporter of his nephew Richard I. During Richard's absence on the Third Crusade , he took the side of the regent William Longchamp . Hamelin appeared in the 2nd coronation of King Richard in 1194 and at King John's coronation in 1199.

He died in 1202 and was buried at the Chapter House at Lewes Priory , in Sussex . He was succeeded by his son William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey . A daughter, named Adela, was the mistress of her cousin King John of England, and by him the mother of Richard Fitz Roy .


Children from this marriage were:

+ 180 F    i. Maud de Warenne 204 was born about 1162 and died before 13 Dec 1228.

+ 181 M    ii. William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey was born about 1174 in Surrey, England, died on 27 May 1240 in London, England about age 66, and was buried in Lewes Priory, Lewes, Sussex, England.

132. Margaret, of Huntingdon 153 (Ada de Warenne91, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in 1201.

Research Notes: Second wife of Alan, Lord of Galloway.

Margaret married Humphrey IV de Bohun, Baron de Bohun, Lord of Hereford,205 son of Humphrey III de Bohun, Baron de Bohun, Lord of Hereford and Margaret, of Hereford, in 1175. Humphrey died about 1182.

Research Notes: Second husband of Margaret of Huntingdon.

From Magna Charta Barons, p. 81:

Humphrey de Bohun, who was Earl of Hereford and lord high constable of England, in right of is mother. He m. Margaret, daughter of Henry, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland, d. v. p. 1152 (and widow of Conale Petit, Earl of Brittany and Richmond, and sister of William the Lion, king of Scots), eldes son of David I., King of Scots, by his wife Matilda, widow of Simon de St. Liz, and daughter of Waltheof, Earl of Northumberland and Northampton, beheaded in 1075, and his wife, a niece of William the conqueror. Lady Margaret's mother, m. 1139, d. 1178, was Ada de Warren, daughter of William, second Earl of Surrey (by his wife, Isabel, or Elizabeth, d. 1131, widow of Robert, Earl of Mellent, and daughter of Hugh the Great, Count de Vermandois, son of Henry I., King of France), the son of William de Warren, Earl of Surrey, by his wife, Gundreda, the reputed daughter of William the Conqueror, or the daughter of his consort, Queen Maud, or Matilda, of Flanders, by Gherbod, advocate of the Abbey of St. Bestin, at St. Omer, before her marriage to William of Normandy. Humphrey de Bohun and Lady Margaret had: Henry de Bohun, eldest son and heir...

Noted events in his life were:

• Hereditary Constable of England:

The child from this marriage was:

+ 182 M    i. Henry de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford 206 was born in 1176 and died on 1 Jun 1220 at age 44.

Margaret next married Alan, Lord of Galloway,207 son of Roland, Lord of Galloway and Elena de Morville, in 1209. Alan was born about 1186 in <Galloway, Wigtownshire, Scotland>, died in 1234 about age 48, and was buried in Abbey of Dundrennan, Kirkcudbright, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland. Another name for Alan was Alan de Galloway.

Research Notes: Per Ancestral Roots, "A descendant of the English and Scottish Kings."

Noted events in his life were:

• Constable of Scotland: 1215-1234.

• Named: in the Magna Charta.

133. Matthew, of Alsace, Count of Boulogne 154 (Thierry I, of Lorraine, Count of Flanders94, Gertrude, of Flanders54, Robert I, Count of Flanders29, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Matthew married Marie, of Blois, Countess of Boulogne,158 daughter of Stephen, of Blois, King of England and Matilda, of Boulogne,. Marie was born in 1136 and died in 1182 at age 46. Another name for Marie was Mary of Blois.

Research Notes: Countess of Boulogne in her own right.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 183 F    i. Mathilde, of Flanders 208 died between 1210 and 1211.

134. Margarite, of Lorraine 155 (Thierry I, of Lorraine, Count of Flanders94, Gertrude, of Flanders54, Robert I, Count of Flanders29, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born between 1140 and 1145 and died on 17 Dec 1195.

Noted events in her life were:

• Heiress of Flanders:

135. Margaret I, of Flanders 156 (Thierry I, of Lorraine, Count of Flanders94, Gertrude, of Flanders54, Robert I, Count of Flanders29, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died on 15 Nov 1194. Another name for Margaret was Margaret I of Alsace.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Margaret I, Countess of Flanders :

Margaret I of Alsace (died 15 November 1194 ) was countess of Flanders from 1191 to her death.

History
She was the daughter of Thierry, Count of Flanders and Sibylla of Anjou , and the heiress of her childless brother, Philip of Flanders .

Family
In 1169 she married Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut , who became her co-ruler. They had the following issue:
Isabelle of Hainaut (Valenciennes , April 1170 - 15 March 1190 , Paris ), married king Philip II of France
Baldwin VI of Hainaut (1171-1205), also count of Flanders and Latin Emperor
Yolanda of Flanders (1175-1219), married Peter of Courtenay , Latin Emperor
Philip I, Marquis of Namur (1175-1212)
Henry of Flanders (1176-1216), Latin Emperor
Sybille (1179 - 9 January 1217 ), married c. 1197 Guichard IV, Sire de Beaujeu (d. 1216). They had a daughter, Agnes of Beaujeu .
Eustace of Hainault (d. 1219), regent of the Kingdom of Thessalonica
Godfrey of Hainault

Noted events in her life were:

• Countess of Flanders: 1191-1194.

Margaret married Baldwin V, of Hainaut 209 in 1169. Baldwin was born in 1150 and died on 17 Dec 1195 at age 45. Other names for Baldwin were Baldwin I Margrave of Namur, Baldwin V Count of Hainaut, and Baldwin VIII Count of Flanders.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut :

Baldwin V of Hainaut (1150 - December 17 , 1195 ) was count of Hainaut (1171-1195), count of Flanders as Baldwin VIII (1191-1195) and margrave of Namur as Baldwin I (1189-1195).

History
He was the son of Baldwin IV, Count of Hainaut . Flanders was acquired via his marriage to Margaret I of Flanders in 1169. Namur was acquired from his mother Alice of Namur .

Family
With Margaret, Baldwin had the following issue:
Isabelle of Hainaut (Valenciennes , April 1170 - March 15 , 1190 , Paris ), married king Philip II of France
Baldwin VI of Hainaut (1171-1205), also count of Flanders and Latin Emperor
Yolanda of Flanders (1175-1219), married Peter II of Courtenay , Latin Emperor
Philip I, Marquis of Namur (1175-1212)
Henry of Flanders (1176-1216), Latin Emperor
Sybille of Hainault (1179 - January 9 , 1217 ), married c. 1197 Guichard IV, Sire de Beaujeu (d. 1216)
Eustace of Hainault (d. 1219), regent of the Kingdom of Thessalonica
Godfrey of Hainault

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Hainaut: 1171-1195.

• Margrave of Namur: 1189-1195.

• Count of Flanders: 1191-1195.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 184 F    i. Yolanda, of Flanders 210 was born in 1175 and died in 1219 at age 44.

136. Marie, of Blois, Countess of Boulogne 158 (Stephen, of Blois, King of England95, Adela, of Normandy55, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1136 and died in 1182 at age 46. Another name for Marie was Mary of Blois.

Research Notes: Countess of Boulogne in her own right.

Marie married Matthew, of Alsace, Count of Boulogne,154 son of Thierry I, of Lorraine, Count of Flanders and Sybil, of Anjou,.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 133)

137. Isabel de Montlhéry, Viscomtessa de Troyes 103 (Lithuaise96, Adela, of Normandy55, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1). Another name for Isabel was Elizabeth de Montlhéry Viscomtessa de Troyes.

Isabel married Thibaud, Seigneur de Dampierre,211 son of Gautier, de Moëlan and Unknown,. Thibaud died in 1107.

Noted events in his life were:

• Seigneur de St. Just:

• Seigneur de St. Dizier en Champagne:

The child from this marriage was:

+ 185 M    i. Guy I, Vicomte de Troyes 212 died in 1151.

138. Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England (Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 5 Mar 1132 in Le Mans, France, died on 6 Jul 1189 at age 57, and was buried in Fontévrault Abbey, France. Another name for Henry was King Henry II of England.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 1-24

Henry married Eleanor, of Aquitaine on 18 May 1152 in Bordeaux, France. Eleanor was born about 1124, died on 31 Mar 1204 in Fontevrault about age 80, and was buried in Fontévrault Abbey, France.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 110-26


Children from this marriage were:

+ 186 F    i. Eleanor, of England 213 was born on 13 Oct 1162 in Domfront, Normandy and died on 31 Oct 1214 at age 52.

+ 187 M    ii. KingJohn "Lackland", of England 214 was born on 24 Dec 1167 in Beaumont Palace, Oxford, England, died on 19 Oct 1216 in Newark Castle, Lincolnshire, England at age 48, and was buried in Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Worcestershire, England.

Henry had a relationship with Ida de Tosny.215 This couple did not marry. Another name for Ida was Ida de Toesny.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk :

Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of a young son William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury ) (b c. 1176 -March 7 , 1226 ). Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king's youngest son made Beaumont's daughter his mistress. Ida's ancestry was unknown for many years, but a charter by her eldest (illegitimate) son refers to his mother as the "Countess Ida" which pins her down to the wife of Roger Bigod. For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century


Their child was:

+ 188 M    i. William Longspée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury 216 was born about 1176 in England, died on 7 Mar 1226 in Salisbury Castle, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England about age 50, and was buried in Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

139. Constance, Princess of Bretagne 106 (Maud, Princess of England99, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1118 in <Bretagne, France>.

Constance married Alan La Zouche 106 about 1123. Alan was born about 1093 in <Rohan, Brittany, France>.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 189 M    i. Geoffrey I de Porhoët 217 was born about 1126 in <Rohan, Brittany, France>.

140. Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester 160 (Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1120 in Glouchestershire, England and died on 29 Jul 1190 in Chester, Cheshire, England about age 70. Another name for Maud was Maud de Caen of Gloucester.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Maud of Gloucester

Maud of Gloucester, Countess of Chester (died 29 July 1190), also known as Maud FitzRobert, was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman, and the daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester , an illegitimate son of King Henry I of England . Her husband was Ranulf de Gernon , 4th Earl of Chester, whom she allegedly poisoned with the assistance of William Peverel of Nottingham .[1]

Family
Lady Maud FitzRobert was born on an unknown date, the daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester and Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester . She had seven siblings including William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Roger, Bishop of Worcester . She also had an illegitimate half-brother, Richard, Bishop of Bayeux, whom her father sired by Isabel de Douvres.

Her paternal grandparents were King Henry I of England and his mistress, Sybil Corbet. Her maternal grandparents were Robert FitzHamon , Lord of Gloucester and Glamorgan , and Sybil de Montgomery, daughter of Roger de Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and Mabel Talvas of Belleme.


Marriage and children
Sometime before 1141, Lady Maud married Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester. She assumed the title of Countess of Chester upon her marriage. Her husband had considerable autonomy in his palatine earldom.

Shortly after their marriage, in January 1141, Maud was besieged at Lincoln Castle by the forces of King Stephen of England . A relief army, loyal to Empress Matilda and led by her father, defeated the King in the fierce fighting which followed, which became known as the First Battle of Lincoln . In return for his help in repelling the King's troops, Maud's father compelled Ranulf to swear fealty to his half-sister Matilda. Ranulf was seized by King Stephen at court in Northampton on 29 August 1146. Stephen later granted him the castle and city of Lincoln sometime after 1151.[2]

Together Ranulf and Maud had three children:
Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester (1147- 30 June 1181), married Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux, by whom he had five children, including Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester , Maud of Chester , and Hawise of Chester, 1st Countess of Lincoln .
Richard of Chester (died 1170/1175), buried in Coventry .
Beatrice of Chester, married Raoul de Malpas
Ranulf had an illegitimate son, Robert FitzCount (died before 1166), by an unknown mistress. His date of birth was not recorded. Robert married as her second husband, Agnes FitzNeel.

On 16 December 1153, Maud allegedly poisoned her husband with the assistance of William Peverel of Nottingham. In 1172, she founded Repton Priory in Derbyshire .[3]

The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property Wadinton de feodo comitis Cestrie, held by Maud, Countess of Chester.[2]

Maud died on 29 July 1190. The Annals of Tewkesbury records the death in 1190 of Maud, Countess of Chester.[2]

Maud married Ranulf IV, de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester,218 son of Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester and Lucy, of Bolingbroke, about 1141. Ranulf was born about 1100 in Gernon Castle, Normandy, France, died on 16 Dec 1153 about age 53, and was buried in St. Werburg's, Chester, Cheshire, England. Other names for Ranulf were Ranulph de Gernon 2nd Earl of Chester, Ranulph de Gernon Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches in Normandy, Ranulf de Guernan Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches, and Ranulph "de Gernon" de Meschines Earl of Chester.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester :

Ranulf II, also known as Ranulf le Meschin or Ranulf de Gernon inherited his palatine earldom in 1128 aged 28, upon the death of his father who was descended from the Counts of Bayeux , Calvados Normandy .

2 Chronology of Ranulf's life
2.1 The loss of the Earl's northern lands to King David of Scotland (1136-1139)
2.2 Ranulf takes Lincoln (1140)
2.3 The Battle of Lincoln (2 February 1141)
2.4 The capture of Robert of Gloucester
2.5 The second siege of Lincoln (1144)
2.6 Ranulf defects to the King (1145-1146)
2.7 Agreement between King David and Earl Ranulf
2.8 Ranulf's treaty with Robert Earl of Leicester
3 Monastic foundation
3.1 The death of the Earl (1153)


Early life
Note: He is the 4th Ranulf (ie Ranulf IV) but he is the 2nd Earl of Chester.

Ranulf was born at Gernon castle , Normandy around 1100 to Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester (should be: Ranulf III, 1st Earl of Chester [of the second creation]) and Lucia Taillebois of Mercia , England. His parents were both significant landowners and he had considerable autonomy within the palatine .

[Much more available in Wikipedia]

Monastic foundation
He founded a North Welsh Cistercian Abbey in 1131 which was colonised by monks from the Norman house, the Congregation of Savigny .

[edit ] The death of the Earl (1153)
In 1153 Ranulf survived a failed attempt at murder by poison by one of his arch-enemies, William Peverel the Younger , when he was guest at Peverel's house. William had poisoned the wine that Ranulf and his men had drunk. Three of Ranulf's men died but the Earl recovered, though he suffered agonizingly, as he had drunk less than his men. William was exiled from England after Henry took the crown as he was accused of poisoning Ranulf and his retainers. The Earl died the same year (due to the poisoning?), on the 16 December 1153 . One other notable event of 1153, was that Duke Henry granted Ranulf Staffordshire . After his death, the Earl's son and heir Hugh was allowed to inherit Ranulf's lands as held in 1135, and other honours bestowed upon Ranulf were revoked.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 190 M    i. Simon III de Montfort, Count of Evreux 219 died about 1181.

+ 191 F    ii. Joanna de Meschines 220 was born about 1145 in <Chester, Cheshire>, England.

+ 192 M    iii. Hugh, of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester 221 was born in 1147 in Kevelioc, Monmouthshire, Wales and died on 30 Jun 1181 in Leek, Staffordshire, England at age 34.

141. William FitzRobert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester (Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1128 and died on 23 Nov 1183 about age 55.

Research Notes: 2nd Earl of Gloucester, Lord of Tewkesbury and Glamorgan
2nd Earl of Gloucester, Lord of the manor of Glamorgan and of Cardiff Castle

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 123-27.
Also line 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont)

William married Hawise de Beaumont, of Leicester, daughter of Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amice de Gael de Montfort, about 1150. Hawise died on 24 Apr 1197.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester

Also Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 63-26

(Duplicate Line. See Person 124)

142. Uchtred, Lord of Galloway 161 (Elizabeth, Princess of England101, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1118 in <Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland> and died on 22 Sep 1174 about age 56. Another name for Uchtred was Uchtred of Galloway.

Uchtred married Gunnild, of Dunbar,222 daughter of Waltheof, Lord of Allerdale and Sigrid, about 1156 in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland. Gunnild was born about 1134 in <Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland>.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 193 M    i. Roland, Lord of Galloway 223 was born about 1164 in <Galloway, Perthshire, Scotland>, died on 19 Dec 1200 in Northamptonshire, England about age 36, and was buried in Abbey of Saint Andrew, Northamptonshire, England.

143. Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor (Judith, of Bavaria102, Henry I, Duke of Bavaria57, Judith, of Normandy31, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1122, died on 10 Jun 1190 at age 68, and was buried in Holy Land. Other names for Frederick were Barbarossa, Frederick I "Barbarossa" Emperor of Germany and Holy Roman Emperor, Frederick III "Barbarosa" Duke of Swabia, and Friedrich I Holy Roman Emperor.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 45-26 :
FREDERICK III, Barbarossa, (Emperor of Germany 1152, as Frederick I), b. 1122, d. 10 June 1190, on the Third Crusade and was bur. somewhere in the Holy Land, Duke of Alsace and Swabia

Wikipedia has much, much more.

Frederick married Beatrix, of Burgundy, daughter of Renaud III, Count of Burgundy and Agatha, in 1156. Beatrix died 15 Nov 1184 or 1185.

Research Notes: 2nd wife of Frederick III "Barbarossa"

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 45-26 (Frederick III, Barbarossa)


The child from this marriage was:

+ 194 M    i. Philip II, of Swabia, King of Germany 224 was born in 1177 and died on 21 Jun 1208 in Bamburg, Germany at age 31.

144. Guy II, of Ponthieu 164 (Hélie, of Burgundy103, Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy59, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1120 and died in 1147 about age 27.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Guy II of Ponthieu :

Guy II of Ponthieu (c. 1120-1147), the son of William III of Ponthieu and Helie of Burgundy, succeeded his father as Count of Ponthieu during William's lifetime. He died on the Second Crusade and was succeeded by his son John I of Ponthieu .

Guy married someone.

His child was:

+ 195 M    i. Jean I, Count of Ponthieu 225 was born about 1140 and died in 1191 about age 51.

145. Ela Talvas, of Alençon and Ponthieu 150 (Hélie, of Burgundy103, Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy59, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1124 in <Alençon, Normandy>, France, died on 10 Oct 1174 in Bradenstoke Priory, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England about age 50, and was buried on 4 Dec 1174. Other names for Ela were Adela Talvaise and Ida Talvaise.

Ela married Patrick, de Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury,226 son of Walter FitzEdward, of Salisbury and Sibyl de Chaworth, about 1149. Patrick was born about 1122 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, died on 27 Mar 1168 in Poitiers, France about age 46, and was buried about 7 Apr 1168 in Abbey of Saint Hilaire, Poitiers, France.

Death Notes: Killed in an ambush by forces of Guy of Lusignan.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Patrick of Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury :

Patrick of Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury (c. 1122 - 1168) was an Anglo-Norman nobleman , and the uncle of the famous William Marshal .

His parents were Walter of Salisbury and Sibilla de Chaworth.[1] Before 1141, Patrick was constable of Salisbury , a powerful local official but not a nobleman. That year, Patrick married his sister to John fitzGilbert the Marshal , who had been a local rival of his, and transferred his allegiance from King Stephen to the Empress Matilda . This political move gained him his earldom, and the friendship of John the Marshal, who was to send his younger son William to stay with him. It was in his household where the famous Marshal first learned about knighthood.

Patrick married twice,[2] his second wife being Ela, daughter of William III Talvas , Duke of Alencon and Ponthieu , whom he married in 1149. They had a son, William in about 1150[1] and three others, including Walter and Philip.[2]
He was killed at Poitiers , France on March 27 1168 in an ambush by forces of Guy of Lusignan .[1]

Noted events in his life were:

• 1st Earl of Wiltshire: Abt 1143. Conferred by Empress Maud

The child from this marriage was:

+ 196 M    i. William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury 227 was born about 1150 in <Salisbury, Wiltshire>, England and died on 17 Apr 1196 in <Salisbury, Wiltshire>, England about age 46.

Ela next married William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne,97 son of William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester,. William was born in 1118 and died in 1148 at age 30.

Research Notes: First husband of Ela (Talvas).

From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :
In her second marriage, to William de Warenne, Elizabeth had three sons and two daughters (for a total of fourteen children - nine during her first marriage, and five during her second):
William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne (b. 1119 dspm 1147) whose daughter Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey married 1stly
William, Count of Boulogne (dsp), yr son of King Stephen, and married 2ndly
Hamelin Plantagenet , an illegitimate half-brother of King Henry II of England by whom she had issue, later earls of Surrey and Warenne.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 90)

146. Thurston le Despencer 165 (Hélie, of Burgundy103, Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy59, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1122 in London, England.

Thurston married Lucia Despencer.228 Lucia was born about 1125 in England.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 197 M    i. Sir Galfridus le Despencer 229 was born in 1155 in Stanley, Lincolnshire, England and died in 1251 in Defford, Worcestershire, England at age 96.

+ 198 M    ii. Thomas Despencer, of Elington, Lincolnshire 230 was born about 1169.

147. Geoffroi III de Joinville, Sénéchal of Champagne and of Bar-sur-Seine 168 (Adélarde de Vignory105, Beatrice, of Burgundy61, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born before 1127 and died in 1188.

Research Notes: Sénéchal of Champagne 1127-1188, and of Bar-sur-Seine

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 71A-27

Noted events in his life were:

• Sénéchal of Champagne: 1127-1188.

• Sénéchal of Bar-sur-Seine:

Geoffroi married Félicité de Brienne,231 daughter of Erard I, Count of Brienne and Alix de Rameru, Dame of Rameru, before 1141. Félicité died on 21 Jul 1178.

Research Notes: Widow of Simon de Broye, d. 1132


The child from this marriage was:

+ 199 M    i. Geoffroi IV de Joinville, Sénéchal of Champagne 232 died in Aug 1190 in Acre, Palestine.

148. Urraca, of Portugal 170 (Afonso I, King of Portugal106, Henry, of Burgundy, Count of Portugal63, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1150 in <Coimbra, Coimbra>, Portugal and died on 16 Oct 1188 in Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain about age 38. Another name for Urraca was Urraca Affonsez of Portugal.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Urraca of Portugal :

Infanta Urraca of Portugal (Coimbra , 1151 - 16 October 1188) was a Portuguese infanta (princess), daughter of Afonso I , 1st King of Portugal and his wife Maud of Savoy . She married Ferdinand II of León (c. 1165) with whom she had Alfonso IX of León . This marriage didn't prevent her father Afonso I from declaring war on his son-in-law. This short war culminated in disaster when Afonso was captured in Badajoz . Perhaps due to his marriage to Urraca, Ferdinand was generous to Afonso, and let him leave. However, the marriage of Ferdinand II and Urraca was annulled in 1175 by the Pope, using the fact that Urraca was his distant cousin as justification.

After the dissolution of her marriage, Urraca returned to the court of her father and died there, aged only 37, nine months after the death of her former husband.

Urraca married Fernando II, King of Léon,173 son of Alfonso VII, King of Castile and Léon and Berenguela, of Barcelona, about Jun 1165 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal. Marriage status: annulment in Jun 1175. Fernando was born in 1137 in Toledo, Castile, Spain and died on 22 Jan 1188 in Benavente, Zamora, Castile, Spain at age 51. Other names for Fernando were Ferdinand II King of Léon and Fernando II Alfonsez King of Léon.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Ferdinand II of León :

Ferdinand II (1137 - 22 January 1188) was King of León and Galicia from 1157 to his death.

Born in Toledo , he was the son of King Alfonso VII of Castile and León and of Berenguela , of the House of Barcelona . His father divided his kingdoms upon his death, with Ferdinand receiving León and Galicia , and another son, Sancho , receiving Castile and Toledo . Ferdinand earned the reputation of a good knight and hard fighter, but did not display political or organising faculty.

His reign of thirty years was one of strife marked by no signal success or reverse. He had to contend with his unruly nobles, several of whom he put to death. During the minority of his nephew, Alfonso VIII of Castile , he endeavoured to impose himself on the kingdom as regent . On the west he was in more or less constant strife with the Kingdom of Portugal , which had separated from León in 1139. His relations with the Portuguese House of Burgundy must have suffered by his repudiation of his wife Urraca , daughter of King Afonso I of Portugal . Though he took the King of Portugal prisoner in 1169, he made no political use of his success. He extended his dominions southward in Extremadura at the expense of the Moors .

Family

By Urraca, married, around 1165, Ferdinand had his son and successor:
Alfonso IX .

Following her repudiation, he formed a relationship with Theresa Fernández de Traba, daughter of count Fernando Pérez de Traba, and in August 1179 he married her, having:
Ferdinand (1178-1187), legitimized through his parents' subsequent marriage
child, b. and d. 6 February 1180, whose birth led to the death of its mother
H
e then formed a liaison with Urraca López de Haro, daughter of Lópe Díaz de Haro, who he married in May 1187, having:
García (1182-1184)
Alfonso, b.1184, legitimized through the subsequent marriage of his parents, died before his father.
Sancho (1186-1220), lord of Fines

Noted events in his life were:

• King of Léon: 1157-1188.

• King of Galicia: 1157-1188.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 200 M    i. Alfonso IX, King of Léon 233 was born on 15 Aug 1171 in Zamora, Léon, Spain and died on 24 Sep 1230 in Villanueva de Sarria, Lugo, Spain at age 59.


149. Sancho I, King of Portugal (Afonso I, King of Portugal106, Henry, of Burgundy, Count of Portugal63, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 11 Nov 1154 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal and died on 26 Mar 1212 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal at age 57.

Research Notes: Wikipedia - Afonso II of Portugal

From Wikipedia - Sancho I of Portugal :

Sancho I (pronounced ['s??u] ; rarely translated to Sanctius I), nicknamed the Populator (Portuguese o Povoador), second monarch of Portugal , was born on November 11 , 1154 in Coimbra and died on March 26 , 1212 in the same city. He was the second but only surviving legitimate son and fourth child of Afonso I Henriques of Portugal by his wife, Maud of Savoy . Sancho succeeded his father in 1185 . He used the title King of the Algarve and/or King of Silves between 1189 and 1191
In 1170 , Sancho was knighted by his father, King Afonso I, and from then on he became his second in command, both administratively and militarily. At this time, the independence of Portugal (declared in 1139 ) was not firmly established. The kings of León and Castile were trying to re-annex the country and the Roman Catholic Church was late in giving its blessing and approval. Due to this situation Afonso I had to search for allies within the Iberian Peninsula . Portugal made an alliance with the Kingdom of Aragon and together they fought Castile and León. To secure the agreement, Infante Sancho of Portugal married, in 1174 , Infanta Dulce Berenguer , younger sister of King Alfonso II of Aragon . Aragon was thus the first Iberian kingdom to recognize the independence of Portugal.
With the death of Afonso I in 1185 , Sancho I became the second king of Portugal. Coimbra was the centre of his kingdom; Sancho terminated the exhausting and generally pointless wars against his neighbours for control of the Galician borderlands. Instead, he turned all his attentions to the south, towards the Moorish small kingdoms (called taifas ) that still thrived. With Crusader help he took Silves in 1191 . Silves was an important city of the South, an administrative and commercial town with population estimates around 20,000 people. Sancho ordered the fortification of the city and built a castle which is today an important monument of Portuguese heritage. However, military attention soon had to be turned again to the North, where León and Castile threatened again the Portuguese borders. Silves was again lost to the Moors. It should be noted that the global Muslim population had climbed to about 6 per cent as against the Christian population of 12 per cent by 1200.
Sancho I dedicated much of his reign to political and administrative organization of the new kingdom. He accumulated a national treasure, supported new industries and the middle class of merchants. Moreover, he created several new towns and villages (like Guarda in 1199 ) and took great care in populating remote areas in the northern Christian regions of Portugal, notably with Flemings and Burgundians - hence the nickname "the Populator". The king was also known for his love of knowledge and literature. Sancho I wrote several books of poems and used the royal treasure to send Portuguese students to European universities.



Sancho married Dulce Berenguer, of Barcelona, daughter of Ramon Berenguer, IV, Count of Barcelona and Unknown, in 1174. Dulce was born in 1152 and died in 1198 at age 46.

Research Notes: Wikipedia - Afonso II of Portugal

From Wikipedia - Dulce Berenguer of Barcelona :

Dulce Berenguer, Princess of Aragon, Queen Consort of Portugal (1152 -1198 ) was first daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona and Petronila of Aragon . She was also the wife of Sancho I of Portugal .

Queen of Portugal
In 1174 she was married to then Prince Sancho as part of an arrangement to secure an alliance between Aragon and Portugal by her brother Alfonso II of Aragon . With her husband's ascent to the throne in 1185, she became Queen Consort .


The child from this marriage was:

+ 201 M    i. Afonso II, King of Portugal was born on 23 Apr 1185 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, died on 25 Mar 1223 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal at age 37, and was buried in Santa Cruz Monastery, Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

150. Sancho III, of Castile 172 (Alfonso VII, King of Castile and Léon108, Urraca, of Castile, Queen of Castile and Léon65, Constance, of Burgundy33, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1134 and died on 30 Aug 1158 at age 24. Another name for Sancho was Sancho "el Deseado" of Castile.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Sancho III of Castile :

Sancho III of Castile (1134 - 31 August 1158) was King of Castile and Toledo for one year, from 1157 to 1158. During the Reconquista , in which he took an active part, he founded the Order of Calatrava . He was called el Deseado (the Desired) due to his position as the first child of his parents, born after eight years of childless marriage.
He was the eldest son of King Alfonso VII of Castile and Berenguela of Barcelona . During his father's reign, he appears as "king of Nájera " as early as 1149. His father's will partitioned the kingdom between his two sons: Sancho inherited the kingdoms of Castile and Toledo, and Fernando inherited Leon. The two brothers had just signed a treaty when Sancho suddenly died in the summer of 1158, being buried at Toledo. He had married in 1151 to Blanca of Navarre , daughter of García Ramírez of Navarre , having two sons, his successor Alfonso VIII of Castile , and infante García, who died at birth in 1156, apparently also resulting in the death of Blanca. There may also have been an older son who died in infancy.

Noted events in his life were:

• King of Castile and Toledo: 1157-1158.

Sancho married Blanca Garcés, of Navarre,234 daughter of Garcia VII, of Navarre and Marguerite, de l'Aigle, on 30 Jan 1151 in Catahorra, Logroño. Blanca was born after 1133, died on 12 Aug 1156, and was buried in Monastery of Santa Maria la Real of Najera. Other names for Blanca were Blanca of Navarre, Blanche of Navarre, and Sancha of Navarre.

Noted events in her life were:

• Betrothal: to Sancho III, 15 Oct 1140.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 202 M    i. Alfonso VIII "the Noble", King of Castile 235 was born on 11 Nov 1155 and died on 5 Oct 1214 at age 58.

151. Fernando II, King of Léon 173 (Alfonso VII, King of Castile and Léon108, Urraca, of Castile, Queen of Castile and Léon65, Constance, of Burgundy33, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1137 in Toledo, Castile, Spain and died on 22 Jan 1188 in Benavente, Zamora, Castile, Spain at age 51. Other names for Fernando were Ferdinand II King of Léon and Fernando II Alfonsez King of Léon.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Ferdinand II of León :

Ferdinand II (1137 - 22 January 1188) was King of León and Galicia from 1157 to his death.

Born in Toledo , he was the son of King Alfonso VII of Castile and León and of Berenguela , of the House of Barcelona . His father divided his kingdoms upon his death, with Ferdinand receiving León and Galicia , and another son, Sancho , receiving Castile and Toledo . Ferdinand earned the reputation of a good knight and hard fighter, but did not display political or organising faculty.

His reign of thirty years was one of strife marked by no signal success or reverse. He had to contend with his unruly nobles, several of whom he put to death. During the minority of his nephew, Alfonso VIII of Castile , he endeavoured to impose himself on the kingdom as regent . On the west he was in more or less constant strife with the Kingdom of Portugal , which had separated from León in 1139. His relations with the Portuguese House of Burgundy must have suffered by his repudiation of his wife Urraca , daughter of King Afonso I of Portugal . Though he took the King of Portugal prisoner in 1169, he made no political use of his success. He extended his dominions southward in Extremadura at the expense of the Moors .

Family

By Urraca, married, around 1165, Ferdinand had his son and successor:
Alfonso IX .

Following her repudiation, he formed a relationship with Theresa Fernández de Traba, daughter of count Fernando Pérez de Traba, and in August 1179 he married her, having:
Ferdinand (1178-1187), legitimized through his parents' subsequent marriage
child, b. and d. 6 February 1180, whose birth led to the death of its mother
H
e then formed a liaison with Urraca López de Haro, daughter of Lópe Díaz de Haro, who he married in May 1187, having:
García (1182-1184)
Alfonso, b.1184, legitimized through the subsequent marriage of his parents, died before his father.
Sancho (1186-1220), lord of Fines

Noted events in his life were:

• King of Léon: 1157-1188.

• King of Galicia: 1157-1188.

Fernando married Urraca, of Portugal,170 daughter of Afonso I, King of Portugal and Maud, of Savoy, about Jun 1165 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal. Marriage status: annulment in Jun 1175. Urraca was born about 1150 in <Coimbra, Coimbra>, Portugal and died on 16 Oct 1188 in Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain about age 38. Another name for Urraca was Urraca Affonsez of Portugal.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Urraca of Portugal :

Infanta Urraca of Portugal (Coimbra , 1151 - 16 October 1188) was a Portuguese infanta (princess), daughter of Afonso I , 1st King of Portugal and his wife Maud of Savoy . She married Ferdinand II of León (c. 1165) with whom she had Alfonso IX of León . This marriage didn't prevent her father Afonso I from declaring war on his son-in-law. This short war culminated in disaster when Afonso was captured in Badajoz . Perhaps due to his marriage to Urraca, Ferdinand was generous to Afonso, and let him leave. However, the marriage of Ferdinand II and Urraca was annulled in 1175 by the Pope, using the fact that Urraca was his distant cousin as justification.

After the dissolution of her marriage, Urraca returned to the court of her father and died there, aged only 37, nine months after the death of her former husband.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 148)

152. Sancha (Alfonso VII, King of Castile and Léon108, Urraca, of Castile, Queen of Castile and Léon65, Constance, of Burgundy33, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1137 and died in 1179 at age 42.

153. Constance (Alfonso VII, King of Castile and Léon108, Urraca, of Castile, Queen of Castile and Léon65, Constance, of Burgundy33, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1141 and died in 1160 at age 19.

154. Albri de Luzarches, Count of Dammartin 174 (Alberic I, Count of Dammartin109, Aelis de Dammartin66, Hugues de Dammartin, Count of Dammartin34, Constance Capet18, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1135 in <Dammartin, Seine-et-Marne>, France, died on 19 Sep 1200 in London, Middlesex, England about age 65, and was buried in Abbaye de Jumieges, Jumieges, Seine-Maritime, France. Other names for Albri were Alberic II Count of Dammartin and Aubrey II Count of Dammartin.

Research Notes: Count of Dammartin by right of his wife

Noted events in his life were:

• Chamberlain of France: 1155-1160.

Albri married Mathilda, of Clermont, Ponthieu & Dammartin,236 daughter of Renaud II, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis and Clémence de Bar-le-Duc, Countess of Dammartin,. Mathilda was born about 1138 in <Pontieu, Ain>, France and died after Oct 1200. Other names for Mathilda were Mabilie of Clermont, Ponthieu & Dammartin, Mahaut de Ponthieu, Maud of Clermont, Ponthieu & Dammartin, and Maude de Clermont.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 203 F    i. Agnes de Dammartin 237 was born about 1166 in <Buckinghamshire>, England and died in 1237 about age 71.

+ 204 M    ii. Simon de Dammartin, Count of Aumale 238 died in 1239.

+ 205 F    iii. Juliane de Dammartin .239

155. William FitzNigell, 2nd Baron of Halton 175 (Sir Nigell FitzIvo, 1st Baron of Halton110, Emme, de Bretagne67, Geoffrey, de Bretagne35, Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1085 in Halton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, died in 1153 at age 68, and was buried in Chester, Cheshire, England. Other names for William were William FitzNigel 2nd Baron of Halton and William Fitz Nigell.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Barons of Halton :

2 William FitzNigel
(1080-1134)
The son of Nigel of Cotentin. He also held the honour of being the Marshal of the Earls' host, which was an important position in the Norman military hierarchy. In addition to his land in Halton, his estate included land in other parts of Cheshire and also in Normandy .[4] He married the eldest daughter of Yorfid, the baron of Widnes . Yorfid left no male heir and on his death the Lancashire manors of Widnes, Appleton, Cronton and Rainhill came to William.[1] In 1115 he established a priory of the Augustinian Order of Canons Regular in Runcorn .[5] He was buried at Chester.[6]

Noted events in his life were:

• Constable:

• Baron of Halton: 1080-1134.

• Established: Runcorn Priory, 1115.

William married Aliva,240 daughter of Yorfid, Baron of Widnes and Unknown, about 1110 in Flamborough, East Riding, Yorkshire, England. Aliva was born about 1085 in East Halton, Skipton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 206 F    i. Agnes FitzWilliam 241 was born about 1114 in East Halton, Skipton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England and died in 1166 about age 52.

+ 207 M    ii. William FitzWilliam, 3rd Baron of Halton 242 died about 1150 in Normandy, (France).

156. John FitzNigell 176 (Sir Nigell FitzIvo, 1st Baron of Halton110, Emme, de Bretagne67, Geoffrey, de Bretagne35, Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1090 in Knaresborough, West Riding, Yorkshire, England and died in 1138 at age 48. Other names for John were John Monoculus FitzNigell and John Monoculus Fitz Nigell.

John married someone.

His child was:

+ 208 M    i. Eustace FitzJohn, 4th Baron of Halton 243 was born about 1110 in Ewyas Harrold, Hereford, England and died on 3 Jul 1157 about age 47.

157. Hervey, of Ravensworth 177 (Acarius Fitz Bardolph, of Rafenswad111, Bardolph, Lord of Ravenswath68, Eudes, Comté de Bretagne36, Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died about 1184 in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/2297.htm :
Background Information. 141 <sources.htm>
Hervey was forester of the New Forest and Arkengarthale, Yorkshire, by the grant of Conan, Duke of Brittany, and son and heir of Akaris Fitz Bardof, which Bardolf was brother of Bodin, who held Ravensworth, Micleton, Romaldkirk &c according to the Domesday Survey.

~ Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, Vol. V, (Fitz Henry), pp. 416-417, footnote (d)
• Background Information. 967 <sources.htm>
Hervey Fitz Akaris, living in 1165, ob. 1182, was "a noble and good knight," who consented that Conan, Earl of Richmound should translate the abbey of charity to East Wilton, and place it on the banks of the river Jore, from which it was called Jorevaulx. He was a witness with his brother walter to a charter of Conan IV, Duke of Brittany and Earl of Richmond (11 Henry II, A.D. 11650); and about the same time he "gave his 9th sheaf of grain which grew on his lands in Lemingford, and Ravenswet to the Priory of Maryke in the Deanery of Richmond." [Burton, Monast. Ebor., p. 357]. He died, 1182, leaving three sons:
Henry Fitz Hervey
Richard
Alan

~ Irish Pedigrees: Or, the Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, pp. 104-105

Hervey married someone.

His child was:

+ 209 M    i. Henry Fitz Hervey, Lord of Ravensworth 244 was born in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died after 16 May 1212 in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

158. Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester 179 (Ranulph II, Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy112, Alice, of Normandy69, Richard III, Duke of Normandy37, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1070 in <Briquessart, Livry, France>, died on 17 Jan 1129 in Chester, Cheshire, England about age 59, and was buried in St Werburgh, Chester, Cheshire, England. Other names for Ranulf were Ranulph III le Meschin de Briquessart 3rd Earl of Chester, Ranulph le Meschin 1st Earl of Chester, Ranulf de Meschines Lord of Cumberland, and Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy.

Death Notes: Death date may be 27 Jan 1128/29.

Research Notes: From thepeerage.com:
Ranulph le Meschin, 1st Earl of Chester gained the title of Vicomte de Bayeux [Normandy].3 He was also known as Ranulph de Briquessart.3 He succeeded to the title of Vicomte d'Avranches [Normandy] on 25 November 1120.3 He was created 1st Earl of Chester [England] in 1121.3 He was Commander of the Royal forces in Normandy in 1124.


-----

From Wikipedia - Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester :

Ranulf le Meschin, Ranulf de Briquessart or Ranulf I [Ranulph, Ralph] (died 1129) was a late 11th- and early 12th-century Norman magnate based in northern and central England. Originating in Bessin in Normandy, Ranulf made his career in England thanks to his kinship with Hugh d'Avranches , the earl of Chester, the patronage of kings William II Rufus and Henry I Beauclerc , and his marriage to Lucy , heiress of the Bolingbroke-Spalding estates in Lincolnshire.

Ranulf fought in Normandy on behalf of Henry I, and served the English king as a kind of semi-independent governor in the far north-west, Cumberland and Westmorland , before attaining the palatine county of Chester on the Anglo-Welsh marches in 1120. He held this position for the remainder of his life, and passed the title on to his son.

Family and origins
Ranulf was the son of Ranulf de Briquessart , viscount of the Bessin, and likely for this reason the former Ranulf was styled le Meschin, "the younger".[2] His mother was Matilda, daughter of Richard, viscount of the Avranchin . We know from an entry in the Durham Liber Vitae , c. 1098 x 1120, that he had an older brother named Richard (who died in youth), and a younger brother named William.[3] He had a sister called Agnes, who later married Robert de Grandmesnil (died 1136).[2]

Ranulf's earliest appearance in extant historical records was 24 April 1089 , the date of a charter of Robert Curthose , Duke of Normandy , to Bayeux Cathedral .[2] Ranulf, as "Ranulf son of Ranulf the viscount", was one of the charter's witnesses.[2] He appeared again in the sources, c. 1093/4, as a witness to the foundation charter of Chester Abbey , granted by his uncle Hugh d'Avranches , palantine count ("earl") of Chester.[2] Between 1098 and 1101, probably in 1098, Ranulf became a major English landowner in his own right when he became the third husband of Lucy , heiress of the honour of Bolingbroke in Lincolnshire.[4] This acquisition also brought him the lordship of Appleby in Cumberland , previously held by Lucy's second husband Ivo Taillebois .[2]

Lord of Cumberland and Westmorland

A charter issued in 1124 by David I , King of the Scots , to Robert I de Brus granting the latter the lordship of Annandale recorded that Ranulf was remembered as holding lordship of Carlisle and Cumberland, holding with the same semi-regal rights by which Robert was to hold Annandale .[2] A source from 1212 attests that the jurors of Cumberland remembered Ranulf as quondam dominus Cumberland ("sometime Lord of Cumberland").[5] Ranulf possessed the power and in some respects the dignity of a semi-independent earl in the region, though he lacked the formal status of being called such. A contemporary illustration of this authority is one charter in the records of Wetheral Priory , which recorded Ranulf addressing his own sheriff, "Richer" (probably Richard de Boivill).[6]

Ivo Taillebois, when he married Ranulf's future wife Lucy, had acquired her Lincolnshire lands; sometime after 1086 he acquired authority in Westmorland and Kendal . Adjacent lands in Lancashire and Westmorland, previously controlled by Earl Tostig Godwinson , were probably carved up in the 1080s by the king, between Roger the Poitevin and Ivo, a territorial division at least partially responsible for the later boundaries between the two counties.[7] Norman lordship in the heartland of Cumberland dates to around 1092, the year King William Rufus seized the region from its previous ruler, Dolfin.[8] There is inconclusive evidence that this happened around the same time as William II's expedition to Carlisle, and that settlers from Ivo's Lincolnshire lands came into Cumberland as a result.[9]

When Ranulf acquired Ivo's authority, or an extended version of it, is not clear. Between 1094 and 1098 Lucy was married to Roger fitz Gerold de Roumare, so it is possible that this marriage was the king's way of transferring authority in the region to Roger fitz Gerold.[10] The "traditional view", and that held by the historian William Kapelle , was that Ranulf's authority in the region did not come about until 1106 or after, as a reward for Ranulf's participation in the Battle of Tinchebrai .[11] Another historian, Richard Sharpe , has recently attacked this view and argued that it probably came in or soon after 1098. Sharpe believed that Lucy was the main mechanism by which this authority changed hands here, and pointed out that Ranulf had been married to Lucy years before Tinchebrai, and that, moreover, Ranulf can be found months before Tinchebrai taking evidence from county jurors at York (which may have been responsible for parts of this partially-shired region at this point).[12]

Firm dates for Ranulf's authority in the region do however come only from 1106 and after, well into the reign of Henry I .[2] It was in 1106 that Ranulf founded a Benedictine monastic house at Wetheral , Wetheral Priory.[2] The record of the jurors of Cumberland dating to 1212 claimed that Ranulf created two baronies in the region, Burgh-by-Sands for Robert de Trevers, Ranulf's brother-in-law, and Liddel for Turgis Brandos.[13] He appears to have attempted to give Gilsland to his brother William, though its lord, "Gille", held out; later the lordship of Allerdale (also called Egremont or Copeland ) was given to William.[14] Kirklinton may have been given to Richard de Boivill, Ranulf's sheriff.[2]

Earl of Chester

Marriage to the a great heiress came only with royal patronage, which in turn came only through having royal respect and trust. Ranulf was however not recorded often at the court of Henry I, and did not form part of the king's closest group of administrative advisers.[15] He was however one of the king's military companions, and served under Henry as an officer of the royal household when the latter was on campaign; Ranulf was in fact one of his three commanders at the Battle of Tinchebrai, where he led the vanguard of Henry's army, and was often in Normandy when the king's interests were threatened there.[16] He is found serving as a royal justice in both 1106 and 1116. Later in his career, 1123-4, he commanded the king's garrison at Évreux during the war with William Clito , and in March 1124 he assisted in the capture of Waleran, Count of Meulan .[2]

The death of Richard , count-palatine of Chester in the White Ship Disaster of 1120 near Barfleur , paved the way for Ranulf's elevation to comital rank.[2] Merely four days before the disaster, Ranulf and his cousin Richard had witnessed a charter together at Cerisy .[2] Henry recognized Ranulf as Richard's successor to the county of Chester.[2] Ranulf's accession may have involved him giving up many of his other lands, including much of his wife's Lincolnshire lands and his land in Cumbria, though direct evidence for this beyond convenient timing is lacking.[17] Richard Sharpe suggested that Ranulf may have had to sell much land in order to pay the king for the palatine-county of Chester, though it could not have covered the whole fee, as Ranulf's son Ranulf de Gernon , when he succeeded his father to Chester in 1129, owed the king £1000 "from his father's debt for the land of Earl Hugh".[18]

Ranulf died in January 1129, and was buried in Chester Abbey.[2] He was survived by his wife and countess, Lucy, and succeeded by his son Ranulf de Gernon.[2] A daughter, Alicia, married Richard de Clare , a lord in the Anglo-Welsh marches.[2]

Noted events in his life were:

• Earl of Chester: 1120-1129. following the death of his first cousin, Hugh d'Avranches, Earl of Chester

• Commander of the Royal Forces in Normandy: 1124.

Ranulf married Lucy, of Bolingbroke,245 daughter of Thorold, Sheriff of Lincoln and < > Malet, about 1098. Lucy was born about 1070 in <Spalding, Lincolnshire>, England and died about 1136 about age 66. Another name for Lucy was Lucia.

Death Notes: Wikipedia has d. abt 1138

Research Notes: Husbands:
Ivo de Tailbois
Roger Fitz Gerold
Ranulph III le Meschin, de Briquessart

From Wikipedia - Lucy of Bolingbroke :

Lucy (died c. 1138), sometimes called Lucy of Bolingbroke[1] was an Anglo-Norman heiress in central England and, later in life, countess-consort of Chester . Probably related to the old English earls of Mercia , she came to possess extensive lands in Lincolnshire which she passed on to her husbands and sons. She was a notable religious patron, founding or co-founding two small religious houses and endowing several with lands and churches.

Ancestry
A charter of Crowland Abbey , now thought to be spurious, described Thorold of Bucknall, perhaps the same as her probable father Thorold of Lincoln, as a brother of Godgifu (Godiva), wife of Leofric, Earl of Mercia .[2] The same charter contradicted itself on the matter, proceeding to style Godgifu's son (by Leofric), Ælfgar, as Thorold's cognatus (cousin).[3] Another later source, from Coventry Abbey , made Lucy the sister of Earls Edwin and Morcar Leofricsson , while two other unreliable sources, the Chronicle of Abbot Ingmund of Crowland and the Peterbrough Chronicle also make Lucy the daughter of Earl Ælfgar.[3] Keats-Rohan's explanation for these accounts is that they were ill-informed and were confusing Lucy with her ancestor, William Malet's mother, who was in some manner related to the family of Godgifu.[3]


Although there is much confusion about Lucy's ancestry in earlier writings, recent historians tend to believe that she was the daughter of Thorold, sheriff of Lincoln , by a daughter of William Malet (died 1071).[4] She inherited a huge group of estates centred on Spalding in Lincolnshire , probably inherited from both the Lincoln and the Malet family.[5] This group of estates have come to be called the "Honour of Bolingbroke ".[6]

Marriages
The heiress Lucy was married to three different husbands, all of whom died in her lifetime. The first of these was to Ivo Taillebois , a marriage which took place "around 1083".[7] Ivo took over her lands as husband, and seems in addition to have been granted estates and extensive authority in Westmorland and Cumberland .[8] Ivo died in 1094.[9]


The second marriage was to one Roger de Roumare or Roger fitz Gerold, with whom she had one son, William de Roumare (future Earl of Lincoln ), who inherited some of her land.[10] The latter was the ancestor of the de Roumare family of Westmorland.[11] Roger died in either 1097 or 1098.[12]
Sometime after this, though before 1101, she was married to Ranulf le Meschin , her last and longest marriage.[13] A son Ranulf de Gernon , succeeded his father to the earldom of Chester (which Ranulf acquired in 1121) and a daughter, Alice, married Richard de Clare .[6]


Upon her death, most of the Lincolnshire lands she inherited passed to her younger son William de Roumare, while the rest passed to Ranulf II of Chester (forty versus twenty knights' fees).[14] The 1130 pipe roll informs us that Lucy had paid King Henry I 500 marks after her last husband's death for the right not to have to remarry.[15] She died around 1138.[6]

Religious patronage
Lucy, as widowed countess, founded the convent of Stixwould in 1135, becoming, in the words of one historian, "one of the few aristocratic women of the late eleventh and twelfth centuryes to achieve the role of independent lay founder".[16] Her religious patronage however centered on Spalding Priory , a religious house for which her own family was the primary patron. This house (a monastic cell of Crowland) was founded, or re-founded, in 1085 by Lucy and her first husband Ivo Taillebois.[16]


Later, she was responsible for many endowments, for instance in the 1120s she and her third husband Earl Ranulf granted the priory the churches of Minting, Belchford and Scamblesby.[16] In 1135, Lucy, now widowed for the last time, granted the priory her own manor of Spalding for the permanent use of the monks.[16] The records indicate that Lucy went to great effort to ensure that, after her own death, her sons would honour and uphold her gifts.[17]

Noted events in her life were:

• Living: 1130.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 210 F    i. Adelize de Gernon 246 was born about 1094 in <Hertford, Hertfordshire>, England and died in 1128 about age 34.

+ 211 M    ii. Ranulf IV, de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester 218 was born about 1100 in Gernon Castle, Normandy, France, died on 16 Dec 1153 about age 53, and was buried in St. Werburg's, Chester, Cheshire, England.

159. William le Meschin, Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire 180 (Ranulph II, Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy112, Alice, of Normandy69, Richard III, Duke of Normandy37, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1100 in <Gernon Castle, Normandy, France>. Another name for William was William de Meschines.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132B-26

William married Cecily de Rumilly,247 daughter of Robert de Rumilly, of Molland, Devon and Unknown,. Cecily was born about 1100 in <Normandy, France>. Another name for Cecily was Cecily de Rumigny.

Research Notes: Daughter and heiress of Robert de Rumilly.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132B-26 (William le Meschin)


The child from this marriage was:

+ 212 F    i. Maud la Meschine 248 was born about 1126 in <Harringworth, Northumberland>, England and died after 1190.

160. Renaud I, Count of Mousson, Count of Bar-le-Duc 182 (Ermentrude, of Burgundy114, Guillaume I de Bourgogne70, Adelais, de Normandie38, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1077 in Bar-le-Duc, Meuse, France and died on 10 Mar 1149 about age 72. Other names for Renaud were Reinald I Count of Mousson, Count of Bar-le-Duc and Renaud I kEEP Comte de Bar.

Renaud married Gisele, of Vaudemont,249 daughter of Gerard, of Lorraine, Count of Vaudemont and Helwide, Countess of Egisheim,. Gisele was born about 1090 in Vaudemont, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France and died after 1141. Another name for Gisele was Gisele de Vaudemont.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 213 F    i. Clémence de Bar-le-Duc, Countess of Dammartin 250 was born about 1110 in <Dammartin, Île-de-France>, France and died after 20 Jan 1183.

161. Adelaide, of Savoy 184 (Gisele, of Burgundy115, Guillaume I de Bourgogne70, Adelais, de Normandie38, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1092 and died on 1 Aug 1154 about age 62.

Death Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 274A-25 has d. 18 Nov. 1154.

Research Notes: Second wife of Louis VI, m. April or May 1115.

Adelaide married Louis VI "the Fat", King of France Apr or May 1115 in Paris, (Île-de-France), France. Louis was born in 1081 and died on 1 Aug 1137 in Chiteau Bethizy, Paris at age 56.

Marriage Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 101-24

Research Notes: King of France 1108-1137, Crusader.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 117-24 and 101-24.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 214 M    i. Peter, of France, Count of Montargis and Courtenay 251 was born about 1125 and died between 1179 and 1183 in Palestine.

162. Amadeus III, Count of Savoy, Maurienne and Turin 185 (Gisele, of Burgundy115, Guillaume I de Bourgogne70, Adelais, de Normandie38, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1095 in <Savoie>, France and died on 30 Aug 1148 in Cyprus about age 53. Another name for Amadeus was Amadeo III Count of Savoy.

Death Notes: FamilySearch has d. 1 Apr 1149

Amadeus married Mathilde, Comtesse d'Albon,252 daughter of Guigues VIII, Comte d'Albon and Mathilde, in 1123. Mathilde was born about 1116 in <Albon>, France and died after Jan 1145. Other names for Mathilde were Mahaud d'Albon and Maud Countess of Albon.

Marriage Notes: FamilySearch has m. 1120

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 274B-25 (Amadeus III)


The child from this marriage was:

+ 215 F    i. Maud, of Savoy 169 was born in 1125 in <Chambéry, Savoie>, France, died on 4 Nov 1158 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal at age 33, and was buried in Igreja Santa Cruz, Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

163. Maud, of Huntingdon 187 (Judith, of Lens117, Adelaide, of Normandy, Countess of Aumale72, Robert I, Duke of Normandy39, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1074 and died in 1131 about age 57. Other names for Maud were Matilda of Huntingdon and Maude of Huntingdon.

Research Notes: Widow of Simon de St. Liz.

From Wikipedia - Maud, Countess of Huntingdon :

Maud of Northumbria (1074-1130), countess for the Honour of Huntingdon , was the daughter of Waltheof II, Earl of Northumbria and Judith of Lens , the last of the major Anglo-Saxon earls to remain powerful after the Norman conquest of England in 1066. She inherited her father's earldom of Huntingdon and married twice.

Her mother, Judith, refused to marry Simon I of St Liz, 1st Earl of Northampton . This refusal angered her uncle, King William I of England , who confiscated Judith's estates after she fled the country. Instead her daughter Maud was married to Simon of St Liz in 1090. She had a number of children with St Liz including:
Matilda of St Liz (Maud), married Robert FitzRichard and then Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester ..
Simon II de St Liz, 4th Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton .
Saint Walteof de St Liz (1100 - bt 1159 - 1160).

Her first husband died in 1109 and Maud next married King David I of Scotland in 1113. From this marriage she had one son, Henry .

The Scottish House of Dunkeld produced the remaining Earls of Huntingdon of the first creation of the title. She was succeeded to the Earldom of Huntingdon by her son Henry.

According to John of Fordun , she died in 1130 and was buried at Scone, but she appears in a charter dated 1147.

Noted events in her life were:

• Countess of Huntingdon and Northumberland:

Maud married Simon de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton,253 son of Ranulph the Rich and Unknown, about 1090. Simon died about 1110. Other names for Simon were Simon de St. Liz and Simon de Senliz Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton.

Research Notes: Crusader, son of Ranulph the Rich, a Norman.

From Wikipedia - Simon I de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon-Northampton :

Simon I of St Liz, 1st Earl of Northampton and 1st Earl of Huntingdon[1] (died 1109) was a Norman nobleman.

He built Northampton Castle and the town walls[2]. He also built one of the three remaining Round churches in England , the The Holy Sepulchre , Sheep Street, Northampton ).

Family
He married Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon . Simon de Senlis, 4th Earl of Northampton was their son. A daughter, Maud de St. Liz, married Robert Fitz Richard . Waltheof of Melrose was also a son.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 216 F    i. Maud de St. Liz 254 died in 1140.


Maud next married David I "The Saint", King of Scots,255 son of Malcolm III Canmore, King of Scots and Saint Margaret, of Scotland, 1113 or 1114. David was born about 1083, died on 24 May 1153 in Carlisle about age 70, and was buried in Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, Scotland. Another name for David was Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - David I of Scotland :

David I or Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim (Modern : Daibhidh I mac [Mhaoil] Chaluim;[1] 1083 x 1085 - 24 May 1153) was a 12th-century ruler who was Prince of the Cumbrians (1113-1124) and later King of the Scots (1124-1153). The youngest son of Malcolm III and Margaret , David spent most of his childhood in Scotland , but was exiled to England temporarily in 1093. Perhaps after 1100, he became a dependent at the court of King Henry I . There he was influenced by the Norman and Anglo-French culture of the court.

When David's brother Alexander I of Scotland died in 1124, David chose, with the backing of Henry I, to take the Kingdom of Scotland (Alba ) for himself. He was forced to engage in warfare against his rival and nephew, Máel Coluim mac Alaxandair . Subduing the latter seems to have taken David ten years, a struggle that involved the destruction of Óengus , Mormaer of Moray . David's victory allowed expansion of control over more distant regions theoretically part of his Kingdom. After the death of his former patron Henry I, David supported the claims of Henry's daughter and his own niece, the former Empress-consort, Matilda , to the throne of England. In the process, he came into conflict with King Stephen and was able to expand his power in northern England, despite his defeat at the Battle of the Standard in 1138.

The term "Davidian Revolution " is used by many scholars to summarise the changes which took place in the Kingdom of Scotland during his reign. These included his foundation of burghs , implementation of the ideals of Gregorian Reform , foundation of monasteries , Normanisation of the Scottish government, and the introduction of feudalism through immigrant French and Anglo-French knights.

Childhood and flight to England
David was born at an unknown point between 1083 and 1085.[2] He was probably the eighth son of King Malcolm III , and certainly the sixth and youngest produced by Malcolm's second marriage to Queen Margaret .[3]

In 1093 King Malcolm and David's brother Edward were killed at the river Aln during an invasion of Northumberland .[4] David and his two brothers Alexander and Edgar , both future kings of Scotland, were probably present when their mother died shortly afterwards.[5] According to later medieval tradition, the three brothers were in Edinburgh when they were besieged by their uncle, Donald Bane .[6]


Donald became King of Scotland.[7] It is not certain what happened next, but an insertion in the Chronicle of Melrose states that Donald forced his three nephews into exile, although he was allied with another of his nephews, Edmund .[8] John of Fordun wrote, centuries later, that an escort into England was arranged for them by their maternal uncle Edgar Ætheling .[9]


Intervention of William Rufus and English exile
William Rufus , King of the English, opposed Donald's accession to the northerly kingdom. He sent the eldest son of Malcolm III, David's half-brother Donnchad , into Scotland with an army. Donnchad was killed within the year,[10] and so in 1097 William sent Donnchad's half-brother Edgar into Scotland. The latter was more successful, and was crowned King by the end of 1097.[11]

During the power struggle of 1093-97, David was in England. In 1093, was probably about nine years old.[12] From 1093 until 1103 David's presence cannot be accounted for in detail, but he appears to have been in Scotland for the remainder of the 1090s. When William Rufus was killed, his brother Henry Beauclerc seized power and married David's sister, Matilda . The marriage made David the brother-in-law of the ruler of England. From that point onwards, David was probably an important figure at the English court.[13] Despite his Gaelic background, by the end of his stay in England, David had become a full-fledged Normanised prince. William of Malmesbury wrote that it was in this period that David "rubbed off all tarnish of Scottish barbarity through being polished by intercourse and friendship with us".[14]

Prince of the Cumbrians, 1113-1124

David's time as Prince of the Cumbrians marks the beginning of his life as a great territorial lord. The year of these beginnings was probably 1113, when Henry I arranged David's marriage to Matilda, Countess of Huntingdon , who was the heiress to the Huntingdon-Northampton lordship. As her husband David used the title of Earl , and there was the prospect that David's children by her would inherit all the honours borne by Matilda's father Waltheof . 1113 is the year when David, for the first time, can be found in possession of territory in what is now Scotland.

Obtaining the inheritance
David's brother, King Edgar, had visited William Rufus in May 1099 and bequeathed to David extensive territory to the south of the river Forth .[15] On 8 January 1107, Edgar died. It has been assumed that David took control of his inheritance , the southern lands bequeathed by Edgar, soon after the latter's death.[16] However, it cannot be shown that he possessed his inheritance until his foundation of Selkirk Abbey late in 1113.[17] According to Richard Oram , it was only in 1113, when Henry returned to England from Normandy, that David was at last in a position to claim his inheritance in southern "Scotland".[18]

King Henry's backing seems to have been enough to force King Alexander to recognise his younger brother's claims. This probably occurred without bloodshed, but through threat of force nonetheless.[19] David's aggression seems to have inspired resentment amongst some native Scots. A Gaelic quatrain from this period complains that:
Olc a ndearna mac Mael Colaim, It's bad what Máel Coluim's son has done;, ar cosaid re hAlaxandir, dividing us from Alexander; do-ní le gach mac rígh romhaind, he causes, like each king's son before; foghail ar faras Albain. the plunder of stable Alba. [20] If "divided from" is anything to go by, this quatrain may have been written in David's new territories in southern "Scotland".[21]

The lands in question consisted of the pre-1975 counties of Roxburghshire , Selkirkshire , Berwickshire , Peeblesshire and Lanarkshire . David, moreover, gained the title princeps Cumbrensis, "Prince of the Cumbrians ", as attested in David's charters from this era.[22] Although this was a large slice of Scotland south of the river Forth, the region of Galloway-proper was entirely outside David's control.[23]

David may perhaps have had varying degrees of overlordship in parts of Dumfriesshire , Ayrshire , Dunbartonshire and Renfrewshire .[24] In the lands between Galloway and the Principality of Cumbria, David eventually set up large-scale marcher lordships, such as Annandale for Robert de Brus, Cunningham for Hugh de Morville, and possibly Strathgryfe for Walter Fitzalan .[25]

In England

In the later part of 1113, King Henry gave David the hand of Matilda of Huntingdon, daughter and heiress of Waltheof, Earl of Northumberland . The marriage brought with it the "Honour of Huntingdon", a lordship scattered through the shires of Northampton , Huntingdon , and Bedford ; within a few years, Matilda de Senlis bore a son, whom David named Henry after his patron.[26]

The new territories which David controlled were a valuable supplement to his income and manpower, increasing his status as one of the most powerful magnates in the Kingdom of the English. Moreover, Matilda's father Waltheof had been Earl of Northumberland , a defunct lordship which had covered the far north of England and included Cumberland and Westmorland , Northumberland -proper, as well as overlordship of the bishopric of Durham. After King Henry's death, David would revive the claim to this earldom for his son Henry.[27]

David's activities and whereabouts after 1114 are not always easy to trace. He spent much of his time outside his principality, in England and in Normandy. Despite the death of his sister on 1 May 1118, David still possessed the favour of King Henry when his brother Alexander died in 1124, leaving Scotland without a king.[28]


Political and military events in Scotland during David's kingship

Michael Lynch and Richard Oram portray David as having little initial connection with the culture and society of the Scots;[29] but both likewise argue that David became increasingly re-Gaelicised in the later stages of his reign.[30] Whatever the case, David's claim to be heir to the Scottish kingdom was doubtful. David was the youngest of eight sons of the fifth from last king. Two more recent kings had produced sons. William fitz Duncan , son of King Donnchad II, and Máel Coluim , son of the last king Alexander, both preceded David in terms of the slowly emerging principles of primogeniture . However, unlike David, neither William nor Máel Coluim had the support of Henry. So when Alexander died in 1124, the aristocracy of Scotland could either accept David as King, or face war with both David and Henry I.[31]

Coronation and struggle for the kingdom

Alexander's son Máel Coluim chose war. Orderic Vitalis reported that Máel Coluim mac Alaxandair "affected to snatch the kingdom from [David], and fought against him two sufficiently fierce battles; but David, who was loftier in understanding and in power and wealth, conquered him and his followers".[32] Máel Coluim escaped unharmed into areas of Scotland not yet under David's control, and in those areas gained shelter and aid.[33]

In either April or May of the same year David was crowned King of Scotland (Gaelic : rí(gh) Alban; Latin : rex Scottorum )[34] at Scone . If later Scottish and Irish evidence can be taken as evidence, the ceremony of coronation was a series of elaborate traditional rituals,[35] of the kind infamous in the Anglo-French world of the 12th century for their "unchristian" elements.[36] Ailred of Rievaulx, friend and one time member of David's court, reported that David "so abhorred those acts of homage which are offered by the Scottish nation in the manner of their fathers upon the recent promotion of their kings, that he was with difficulty compelled by the bishops to receive them".[37]

Outside his "Cumbrian" principality and the southern fringe of Scotland-proper, David exercised little power in the 1120s, and in the words of Richard Oram, was "king of Scots in little more than name".[38] He was probably in that part of Scotland he did rule for most of the time between late 1127 and 1130.[39] However, he was at the court of Henry in 1126 and in early 1127,[40] and returned to Henry's court in 1130, serving as a judge at Woodstock for the treason trial of Geoffrey de Clinton .[39] It was in this year that David's wife, Matilda of Huntingdon, died. Possibly as a result of this,[41] and while David was still in southern England,[42] Scotland-proper rose up in arms against him.

The instigator was, again, his nephew Máel Coluim, who now had the support of Óengus of Moray . King Óengus was David's most powerful "vassal", a man who, as grandson of King Lulach of Scotland , even had his own claim to the kingdom. The rebel Scots had advanced into Angus , where they were met by David's Mercian constable , Edward ; a battle took place at Stracathro near Brechin . According to the Annals of Ulster , 1000 of Edward's army, and 4000 of Óengus' army, including Óengus himself, died.[43]

According to Orderic Vitalis, Edward followed up the killing of Óengus by marching north into Moray itself, which, in Orderic's words, "lacked a defender and lord"; and so Edward, "with God's help obtained the entire duchy of that extensive district".[44] However, this was far from the end of it. Máel Coluim escaped, and four years of continuing "civil war" followed; for David this period was quite simply a "struggle for survival".[45]

It appears that David asked for and obtained extensive military aid from his patron, King Henry. Ailred of Rievaulx related that at this point a large fleet and a large army of Norman knights, including Walter l'Espec, were sent by Henry to Carlisle in order to assist David's attempt to root out his Scottish enemies.[46] The fleet seems to have been used in the Irish Sea , the Firth of Clyde and the entire Argyll coast, where Máel Coluim was probably at large among supporters. In 1134 Máel Coluim was captured and imprisoned in Roxburgh Castle .[47] Since modern historians no longer confuse him with Malcolm MacHeth , it is clear that nothing more is ever heard of Máel Coluim mac Alaxadair, except perhaps that his sons were later allied with Somerled .[48]

Pacification of the west and north
Richard Oram puts forward the suggestion that it was during this period that David granted Walter fitz Alan the kadrez of Strathgryfe , with northern Kyle and the area around Renfrew , forming what would become the "Stewart" lordship of Strathgryfe; he also suggests that Hugh de Morville may have gained the kadrez of Cunningham and the settlement of "Strathyrewen" (i.e. Irvine ). This would indicate that the 1130-34 campaign had resulted in the acquisition of these territories.[49]

How long it took to pacify Moray is not known, but in this period David appointed his nephew William fitz Duncan to succeed Óengus, perhaps in compensation for the exclusion from the succession to the Scottish throne caused by the coming of age of David's son Henry . William may have been given the daughter of Óengus in marriage, cementing his authority in the region. The burghs of Elgin and Forres may have been founded at this point, consolidating royal authority in Moray.[50] David also founded Urquhart Priory , possibly as a "victory monastery", and assigned to it a percentage of his cain (tribute) from Argyll.[51]

During this period too, a marriage was arranged between the son of Matad, Mormaer of Atholl , and the daughter of Haakon Paulsson , Earl of Orkney . The marriage temporarily secured the northern frontier of the Kingdom, and held out the prospect that a son of one of David's Mormaers could gain Orkney and Caithness for the Kingdom of Scotland. Thus, by the time Henry I died on 1 December 1135, David had more of Scotland under his control than ever before.[52]

Dominating the north

While fighting King Stephen and attempting to dominate northern England in the years following 1136, David was continuing his drive for control of the far north of Scotland. In 1139, his cousin, the five year old Harald Maddadsson , was given the title of "Earl" and half the lands of the earldom of Orkney , in addition to Scottish Caithness. Throughout the 1140s Caithness and Sutherland were brought back under the Scottish zone of control.[53] Sometime before 1146 David appointed a native Scot called Aindréas to be the first Bishop of Caithness , a bishopric which was based at Halkirk , near Thurso , in an area which was ethnically Scandinavian.[54]

In 1150, it looked like Caithness and the whole earldom of Orkney were going to come under permanent Scottish control. However, David's plans for the north soon began to encounter problems. In 1151, King Eystein II of Norway put a spanner in the works by sailing through the waterways of Orkney with a large fleet and catching the young Harald unawares in his residence at Thurso. Eystein forced Harald to pay fealty as a condition of his release. Later in the year David hastily responded by supporting the claims to the Orkney earldom of Harald's rival Erlend Haraldsson , granting him half of Caithness in opposition to Harald. King Eystein responded in turn by making a similar grant to this same Erlend, cancelling the effect of David's grant. David's weakness in Orkney was that the Norwegian kings were not prepared to stand back and let him reduce their power.[55]

England

David's relationship with England and the English crown in these years is usually interpreted in two ways. Firstly, his actions are understood in relation to his connections with the King of England. No historian is likely to deny that David's early career was largely manufactured by King Henry I of England. David was the latter's "greatest protégé",[56] one of Henry's "new men".[57] His hostility to Stephen can be interpreted as an effort to uphold the intended inheritance of Henry I, the succession of his daughter, Matilda , the former Empress of the Holy Roman Empire. David carried out his wars in her name, joined her when she arrived in England, and later knighted her son, the future Henry II .[58]

However, David's policy towards England can be interpreted in an additional way. David was the independence-loving king trying to build a "Scoto-Northumbrian" realm by seizing the most northerly parts of the English kingdom. In this perspective, David's support for Matilda is used as a pretext for land-grabbing. David's maternal descent from the House of Wessex and his son Henry's maternal descent from the English Earls of Northumberland is thought to have further encouraged such a project, a project which only came to an end after Henry II ordered David's child successor Máel Coluim IV to hand over the most important of David's gains. It is clear that neither one of these interpretations can be taken without some weight being given to the other.[59]


Usurpation of Stephen and First Treaty of Durham
Henry I had arranged his inheritance to pass to his daughter Empress Matilda . Instead, Stephen , younger brother of Theobald II, Count of Blois , seized the throne.[60] David had been the first lay person to take the oath to uphold the succession of Matilda in 1127, and when Stephen was crowned on 22 December 1135, David decided to make war.[61]

Before December was over, David marched into northern England, and by the end of January he had occupied the castles of Carlisle , Wark , Alnwick , Norham and Newcastle . By February David was at Durham, but an army led by King Stephen met him there. Rather than fight a pitched battle, a treaty was agreed whereby David would retain Carlisle, while David's son Henry was re-granted the title and half the lands of the earldom of Huntingdon, territory which had been confiscated during David's revolt. On Stephen's side he received back the other castles; and while David would do no homage, Stephen was to receive the homage of Henry for both Carlisle and the other English territories. Stephen also gave the rather worthless but for David face-saving promise that if he ever chose to resurrect the defunct earldom of Northumberland, Henry would be given first consideration. Importantly, the issue of Matilda was not mentioned. However, the first Durham treaty quickly broke down after David took insult at the treatment of his son Henry at Stephen's court.[62]


Renewal of war and Clitheroe
When the winter of 1136-37 was over, David again invaded England. The King of the Scots confronted a northern English army waiting for him at Newcastle. Once more pitched battle was avoided, and instead a truce was agreed until November. When November fell, David demanded that Stephen hand over the whole of the old earldom of Northumberland. Stephen's refusal led to David's third invasion, this time in January 1138.[63]

The army which invaded England in the January and February 1138 shocked the English chroniclers. Richard of Hexham called it "an execrable army, savager than any race of heathen yielding honour to neither God nor man" and that it "harried the whole province and slaughtered everywhere folk of either sex, of every age and condition, destroying, pillaging and burning the vills, churches and houses".[64] Several doubtful stories of cannibalism were recorded by chroniclers, and these same chroniclers paint a picture of routine enslavings, as well as killings of churchmen, women and infants.[65]

By February King Stephen marched north to deal with David. The two armies avoided each other, and Stephen was soon on the road south. In the summer David split his army into two forces, sending William fitz Duncan to march into Lancashire , where he harried Furness and Craven . On 10 June, William fitz Duncan met a force of knights and men-at-arms. A pitched battle took place, the battle of Clitheroe , and the English army was routed.[66]


Battle of the Standard and Second Treaty of Durham
By later July, 1138, the two Scottish armies had reunited in "St Cuthbert's land", that is, in the lands controlled by the Bishop of Durham , on the far side of the river Tyne . Another English army had mustered to meet the Scots, this time led by William, Earl of Aumale . The victory at Clitheroe was probably what inspired David to risk battle. David's force, apparently 26,000 strong and several times larger than the English army, met the English on 22 August at Cowdon Moor near Northallerton , North Yorkshire .[67]

The Battle of the Standard , as the encounter came to be called, was unsuccessful for the Scots. Afterwards, David and his surviving notables retired to Carlisle. Although the result was a defeat, it was not by any means decisive. David retained the bulk of his army and thus the power to go on the offensive again. The siege of Wark, for instance, which had been going on since January, continued until it was captured in November. David continued to occupy Cumberland as well as much of Northumberland .[68]

On 26 September Cardinal Alberic , Bishop of Ostia , arrived at Carlisle where David had called together his kingdom's nobles, abbots and bishops. Alberic was there to investigate the controversy over the issue of the Bishop of Glasgow's allegiance or non-allegiance to the Archbishop of York. Alberic played the role of peace-broker, and David agreed to a six week truce which excluded the siege of Wark. On 9 April David and Stephen's wife Matilda of Boulogne met each other at Durham and agreed a settlement. David's son Henry was given the earldom of Northumberland and was restored to the earldom of Huntingdon and lordship of Doncaster ; David himself was allowed to keep Carlisle and Cumberland. King Stephen was to retain possession of the strategically vital castles of Bamburgh and Newcastle. This effectively fulfilled all of David's war aims.[68]

Arrival of Matilda and the renewal of conflict
The settlement with Stephen was not set to last long. The arrival in England of the Empress Matilda gave David an opportunity to renew the conflict with Stephen. In either May or June, David travelled to the south of England and entered Matilda's company; he was present for her expected coronation at Westminster Abbey , though this never took place. David was there until September, when the Empress found herself surrounded at Winchester .[69]

This civil war, or "the Anarchy " as it was later called, enabled David to strengthen his own position in northern England. While David consolidated his hold on his own and his son's newly acquired lands, he also sought to expand his influence. The castles at Newcastle and Bamburgh were again brought under his control, and he attained dominion over all of England north-west of the river Ribble and Pennines , while holding the north-east as far south as the river Tyne, on the borders of the core territory of the bishopric of Durham. While his son brought all the senior barons of Northumberland into his entourage, David rebuilt the fortress of Carlisle. Carlisle quickly replaced Roxburgh as his favoured residence. David's acquisition of the mines at Alston on the South Tyne enabled him to begin minting the Kingdom of Scotland 's first silver coinage. David, meanwhile, issued charters to Shrewsbury Abbey in respect to their lands in Lancashire .[70]


Bishopric of Durham and the Archbishopric of York
However, David's successes were in many ways balanced by his failures. David's greatest disappointment during this time was his inability to ensure control of the bishopric of Durham and the archbishopric of York. David had attempted to appoint his chancellor, William Comyn, to the bishopric of Durham, which had been vacant since the death of Bishop Geoffrey Rufus in 1140. Between 1141 and 1143, Comyn was the de facto bishop, and had control of the bishop's castle; but he was resented by the chapter . Despite controlling the town of Durham, David's only hope of ensuring his election and consecration was gaining the support of the Papal legate, Henry of Blois , Bishop of Winchester and brother of King Stephen. Despite obtaining the support of the Empress Matilda, David was unsuccessful and had given up by the time William de St Barbara was elected to the see in 1143.[71]

David also attempted to interfere in the succession to the archbishopric of York. William FitzHerbert , nephew of King Stephen, found his position undermined by the collapsing political fortune of Stephen in the north of England, and was deposed by the Pope. David used his Cistercian connections to build a bond with Henry Murdac , the new archbishop. Despite the support of Pope Eugenius III , supporters of King Stephen and William FitzHerbert managed to prevent Henry taking up his post at York. In 1149, Henry had sought the support of David. David seized on the opportunity to bring the archdiocese under his control, and marched on the city. However, Stephen's supporters became aware of David's intentions, and informed King Stephen. Stephen therefore marched to the city and installed a new garrison. David decided not to risk such an engagement and withdrew.[72] Richard Oram has conjectured that David's ultimate aim was to bring the whole of the ancient kingdom of Northumbria into his dominion. For Oram, this event was the turning point, "the chance to radically redraw the political map of the British Isles lost forever".[73]

Scottish Church

Historical treatment of David I and the Scottish church usually emphasises David's pioneering role as the instrument of diocesan reorganisation and Norman penetration, beginning with the bishopric of Glasgow while David was Prince of the Cumbrians, and continuing further north after David acceded to the throne of Scotland. Focus too is usually given to his role as the defender of the Scottish church's independence from claims of overlordship by the Archbishop of York and the Archbishop of Canterbury .

Ecclesiastical disputes
One of the first problems David had to deal with as king was an ecclesiastical dispute with the English church. The problem with the English church concerned the subordination of Scottish sees to the archbishops of York and/or Canterbury, an issue which since his election in 1124 had prevented Robert of Scone from being consecrated to the see of St Andrews (Cell Ríghmonaidh). It is likely that since the 11th century the bishopric of St Andrews functioned as a de facto archbishopric. The title of "Archbishop" is accorded in Scottish and Irish sources to Bishop Giric [82] and Bishop Fothad II .[83]

The problem was that this archiepiscopal status had not been cleared with the papacy, opening the way for English archbishops to claim overlordship of the whole Scottish church. The man responsible was the new aggressively assertive Archbishop of York, Thurstan . His easiest target was the bishopric of Glasgow, which being south of the river Forth was not regarded as part of Scotland nor the jurisdiction of St Andrews. In 1125, Pope Honorius II wrote to John, Bishop of Glasgow ordering him to submit to the archbishopric of York.[84] David ordered Bishop John of Glasgow to travel to the Apostolic See in order to secure a pallium which would elevate the bishopric of St Andrews to an archbishopric with jurisdiction over Glasgow.[85]

Thurstan travelled to Rome, as did the Archbishop of Canterbury, William de Corbeil , and both presumably opposed David's request. David however gained the support of King Henry, and the Archbishop of York agreed to a year's postponement of the issue and to consecrate Robert of Scone without making an issue of subordination.[86] York's claim over bishops north of the Forth were in practice abandoned for the rest of David's reign, although York maintained her more credible claims over Glasgow.[87]

In 1151, David again requested a pallium for the Archbishop of St Andrews. Cardinal John Paparo met David at his residence of Carlisle in September 1151. Tantalisingly for David, the Cardinal was on his way to Ireland with four pallia to create four new Irish archbishoprics. When the Cardinal returned to Carlisle, David made the request. In David's plan, the new archdiocese would include all the bishoprics in David's Scottish territory, as well as bishopric of Orkney and the bishopric of the Isles . Unfortunately for David, the Cardinal does not appear to have brought the issue up with the papacy. In the following year the papacy dealt David another blow by creating the archbishopric of Trondheim, a new Norwegian archbishopric embracing the bishoprics of the Isles and Orkney.[88]

Succession and death

Perhaps the greatest blow to David's plans came on 12 July 1152 when Henry, Earl of Northumberland, David's only son and successor, died. He had probably been suffering from some kind of illness for a long time. David had under a year to live, and he may have known that he was not going to be alive much longer. David quickly arranged for his grandson Máel Coluim to be made his successor, and for his younger grandson William to be made Earl of Northumberland. Donnchad I, Mormaer of Fife , the senior magnate in Scotland-proper, was appointed as rector, or regent , and took the 11 year-old Máel Coluim around Scotland-proper on a tour to meet and gain the homage of his future Gaelic subjects. David's health began to fail seriously in the Spring of 1153, and on 24 May 1153, David died.[89] In his obituary in the Annals of Tigernach , he is called Dabíd mac Mail Colaim, rí Alban & Saxan, "David, son of Máel Coluim, King of Scotland and England", a title which acknowledged the importance of the new English part of David's realm.[90]

Monastic patronage
David was one of medieval Scotland's greatest monastic patrons. In 1113, in perhaps David's first act as Prince of the Cumbrians, he founded Selkirk Abbey for the Tironensians .[118] David founded more than a dozen new monasteries in his reign, patronising various new monastic orders.[119]

Not only were such monasteries an expression of David's undoubted piety, but they also functioned to transform Scottish society. Monasteries became centres of foreign influence,, and provided sources of literate men, able to serve the crown's growing administrative needs.[120] These new monasteries, and the Cistercian ones in particular, introduced new agricultural practices.[121] Cistercian labour, for instance, transformed southern Scotland into one of northern Europe's most important sources of sheep wool.[122]

Noted events in his life were:

• Prince of the Cumbrians: 1113-1124.

• Crowned: King of Scots, 23 Apr 1124, Scone, (Perth and Kinross), Scotland. King of Scots 23 Apr. 1124-1153.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 217 M    i. Henry, of Huntingdon, Earl of Northumberland & Huntingdon 152 was born in 1114 and died on 12 Jun 1152 at age 38.

164. Alice Huntingdon 188 (Judith, of Lens117, Adelaide, of Normandy, Countess of Aumale72, Robert I, Duke of Normandy39, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1085 in <Flamsted, Hertfordshire>, England and died after 1126. Other names for Alice were Adelise and Adeliza Huntingdon.

Alice married Ralph de Toeni, de Conches,256 son of Ralph de Toeni, de Conches and Isabel de Montfort, in 1103 in England. Ralph was born about 1079 in <Flamsted, Hertfordshire>, England, died about 1126 in Conches, Seine-et-Marne, France about age 47, and was buried in Conches, Seine-et-Marne, France. Another name for Ralph was Ralph de Conches.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 218 M    i. Roger de Toeni, de Conches 256 was born about 1104 in <Flamsted, Hertfordshire>, England and died before 1162.

165. Hamelin Plantagenet, 5th Earl of Surrey 189 (Geoffrey V Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy119, Fulk V "the Young", Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem73, Fulk IV "le Réchin", Count of Anjou40, Ermengarde, of Anjou21, Fulk III "the Black", of Maine, Count of Anjou9, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1129, died on 7 May 1202 about age 73, and was buried in Chapter House, Lewes Priory, Surrey, England. Other names for Hamelin were Hamelin Earl of Surrey and Hamelin de Warenne 5th Earl of Surrey.

Research Notes: Natural son of Geoffrey V (Plantagenet). Second husband of Isabel de Warenne.

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872178 :

Earl of Surrey, Count of Anjou and Maine, Viscount of Touraine and [illegitimate] half-brother of Henry II, King of England. Hamelin supported Henry II against the rebellion by his sons in 1173. In 1176, he escorted Henry's daughter Joan for her marriage to the King of Sicily. Hamelin was present at the Coronation of Richard I and was opposed to the rule of John while Richard was on crusade and later, imprisoned. In 1193, Hamelin was one of the Treasurers for the ransom of the King. Hamelin also attended the Coronation of King John in 1199. Hamelin was the benefactor of quite a number of Abbeys, Priorys and other religious communities in both England and France.
------------
From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois:

Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey married 1stly
William, Count of Boulogne (dsp), yr son of King Stephen, and married 2ndly
Hamelin Plantagenet , an illegitimate half-brother of King Henry II of England by whom she had issue, later earls of Surrey and Warenne.

From Wikipedia - Hamelin de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey :
Hamelin de Warenne[citation needed ] (Plantagenet) 1129 - May 7 , 1202 ) was an English nobleman who was prominent at the courts of the Angevin kings of England , Henry II , Richard I , and John .

He was an illegitimate son of Geoffrey of Anjou , and thus a half-brother of King Henry II , and an uncle of Richard the Lionheart and King John . His half-brother Henry gave him one of the wealthiest heiresses in England, Isabella de Warenne , in her own right Countess of Surrey. She was the widow of William of Blois . Hamelin and Isabella married in April 1164, and after the marriage he was recognized as Comte de Warenne, that being the customary designation for what more technically should be Earl of Surrey . In consequence of the marriage Hamelin took the de Warenne toponymic, as did his descendants. He and Isabella would have four children.

Warenne land in England centered around Conisbrough in Yorkshire , a location in which Hamelin built a powerful castle. He also possessed the third penny (entitlement to one third of the fines levied in the county courts) of County Surrey and held the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Normandy .

Hamelin joined in the denunciations of Thomas Becket in 1164, although after Becket's death he became a great believer in Becket's sainthood, having, the story goes, been cured of blindness by the saint's help. In 1176, he escorted his niece Joan of England to Sicily for her marriage.

He remained loyal to Henry through all the problems of the later part of the king's reign when many nobles deserted him, and continued as a close supporter of his nephew Richard I. During Richard's absence on the Third Crusade , he took the side of the regent William Longchamp . Hamelin appeared in the 2nd coronation of King Richard in 1194 and at King John's coronation in 1199.

He died in 1202 and was buried at the Chapter House at Lewes Priory , in Sussex . He was succeeded by his son William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey . A daughter, named Adela, was the mistress of her cousin King John of England, and by him the mother of Richard Fitz Roy .

Hamelin married Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey,151 daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne and Ela Talvas, of Alençon and Ponthieu, in Apr 1164. Isabelle died on 13 Jul 1199. Another name for Isabelle was Isabel de Warenne Countess of Surrey.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

In [Elizabeth's] second marriage, to William de Warenne, Elizabeth had three sons and two daughters (for a total of fourteen children - nine during her first marriage, and five during her second):
William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne (b. 1119 dspm 1147) whose daughter Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey married 1stly
William, Count of Boulogne (dsp), yr son of King Stephen, and married 2ndly
Hamelin Plantagenet , an illegitimate half-brother of King Henry II of England by whom she had issue, later earls of Surrey and Warenne.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 131)

166. William IV Taillifer, Count of Angoulême 191 (Vulgrin II, Comté d'Angoulême120, William III, Count of Angoulême74, Foulques "Taillefer", Comté d'Angoulême41, Geoffroy d'Angoulême22, Gerberge, d'Anjou10, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died on 7 Aug 1179 in Messina, Sicily. Another name for William was Guillaume "Taillifer" Comté d'Angoulême.

Research Notes: 3rd husband of Marguerite de Turenne.

From Wikipedia - William IV of Angoulême :

William IV of Angoulême, inherited the territory of Count of Angouleme from his father, Wulgrin II of Angoulême .

It is from him, that the territory was split between the three brothers all sons of William IV: Wulgrin III of Angoulême who was the eldest, William V of Angoulême and Aymer of Angoulême .

After the death of Aymer, the territory did not pass to Aymer's daughter, Isabella of Angouleme , Queen consort to John of England , but rather to the daughter of Wulgrim III, Mathilde of Angoulême , who had married Hugh IX of Lusignan , father of Hugh X of Lusignan .

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Angoulême: 1140-1179.

William married Marguerite, de Turenne,257 daughter of Raymond I, Viscount of Turenne and Mathilde de Perche, about 1147.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 153A-25.
--
From http://cybergata.com/roots/1112.htm :
Web Reference: Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands, Margurite de Turenne .
Marguerite de Turenne was the daughter of Raymond de Turenne and his wife Mathilde du Perche, daughter of Geoffroy comté d Perche and his wife Beatrix de Roucy. Marguerite married, as her first husband, Ademar, Vicomté de Limoges; as her second husband, Ebles, vicomté de Limoges; and as her third husband, Guillaume VI "taillefer" comté d'Angoulême.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 219 M    i. Aymar "Taillifer", de Valence, Comté d'Angoulême 258 was born about 1160 in Angoulême, France and died on 16 Jul 1202 in Limoges, France about age 42.

+ 220 M    ii. Wulgrin III, Count of Angoulême .

previous  Tenth Generation  Next



167. Elizabeth de Courtenay, Dame de Courtenay (Renaud de Courtenay, Sire de Courtenay122, Ermengarde, de Nevers79, Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre44, William I, Count of Nevers24, Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born before 1150 and died after 1205. Another name for Elizabeth was Isabel de Courtenay Dame de Courtenay.

Research Notes: Heiress of Courtenay.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 107-26

Elizabeth married Peter, of France, Count of Montargis and Courtenay,251 son of Louis VI "the Fat", King of France and Adelaide, of Savoy, about 1150. Peter was born about 1125 and died between 1179 and 1183 in Palestine.

Research Notes: Crusader in 1147.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 117-25. Line 107-26 (Elizabeth de Courtenay) has b. abt. 1121, d. 1179-10 Apr 1183.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 221 F    i. Alix de Courtenay 259 died in 1218.

+ 222 M    ii. Peter de Courtenay, Count of Courtenay 260 was born about 1155 and died before Jan 1218 in Epirus.

168. Renaud de Courtenay 193 (Renaud de Courtenay, Sire de Courtenay122, Ermengarde, de Nevers79, Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre44, William I, Count of Nevers24, Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1150, died on 27 Sep 1194 about age 44, and was buried in Ford Abbey, Devonshire, England. Another name for Renaud was Reginald de Courtenay.

Renaud married Hawise de Courcy,261 daughter of William de Courcy and Maud d'Avranches, Lady of Oakhampton, about 1175. Hawise was born about 1135 in <Okehampton, Devonshire>, England, died on 31 Jul 1219 about age 84, and was buried in Ford Abbey, Devonshire, England. Another name for Hawise was Hawise de Curcy.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 223 M    i. Robert de Courtenay 145 was born in 1170 in <Okehampton, Devonshire>, England, died on 26 Jul 1242 in Iwerne, Dorset, England at age 72, and was buried on 28 Jul 1242 in Ford Abbey, Devonshire, England.

+ 224 M    ii. Sir Robert de Courtenay, Baron of Oakhampton 262 was born about 1183, died on 26 Jul 1242 about age 59, and was buried in Ford Abbey, Devonshire, England.

169. Egelina de Courtenay 194 (Renaud de Courtenay, Sire de Courtenay122, Ermengarde, de Nevers79, Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre44, William I, Count of Nevers24, Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1155 in <Colston, Nottinghamshire>, England and died about 1214 about age 59.

Egelina married Gilbert Bassett,194 son of Thomas Basset and Alice de Dunstanville, of Castle Combe, Wiltshire, about 1175 in Bicester, Oxfordshire, England. Gilbert was born about 1154 in <Hedington, Oxfordshire>, England and died in 1207 about age 53.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 225 F    i. Eustacia Basset 194 was born about 1176 in <Bichester, Oxfordshire>, England and died in 1215 about age 39.

170. Margaret de Beaumont 196 (Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester123, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1156 in <Hampshire>, England and died about 12 Jan 1235 about age 79. Another name for Margaret was Margaret de Harcourt.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots, line 53-27 has "d. prob. on 12 Jan. 1234/5 but sh. bef. 12 Feb. 1234/5"

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford
and
Source: Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester

Margaret married Saher IV de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester,263 son of Robert de Quincy, Lord of Buckley and of Fawside and Orabilis, of Leuchars, before 1173 in England. Saher was born in 1155 and died on 3 Nov 1219 in Palestine at age 64. Other names for Saher were Seer de Quincy, Saher de Quincey Earl of Winchester, Saher de Quincey Earl of Winchester, and Saer de Quincy 1st Earl of Winchester.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester

Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester (1155 - 1219 -11-03 ) was one of the leaders of the baronial rebellion against King John of England , and a major figure in both Scotland and England in the decades around the turn of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

Saer de Quincy's immediate background was in the Scottish kingdom: his father was a knight in the service of king William the Lion , and his mother was the heiress of the lordship of Leuchars in Fife (see below ). His rise to prominence in England came through his marriage to Margaret, the younger sister of Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester : but it is probably no coincidence that her other brother was the de Quincys' powerful Fife neighbour, Roger de Beaumont , Bishop of St Andrews . In 1204, Earl Robert died, leaving Margaret as co-heiress of the vast earldom along with her elder sister. The estate was split in half, and after the final division was ratified in 1207, de Quincy was made Earl of Winchester .

Following his marriage, de Quincy became a prominent military and diplomatic figure in England. There is no evidence of any close alliance with King John , however, and his rise to importance was probably due to his newly-acquired magnate status and the family connections that underpinned it.

Family
The family of de Quincy had arrived in England after the Norman Conquest , and took their name from Cuinchy in the Arrondissement of Béthune ; the personal name "Saer" was used by them over several generations. Both names are variously spelled in primary sources and older modern works, the first name being sometimes rendered Saher or Seer, and the surname as Quency or Quenci.

The first recorded Saer de Quincy (known to historians as "Saer I") was lord of the manor of Long Buckby in Northamptonshire in the earlier twelfth century, and second husband of Matilda of St Liz , stepdaughter of King David I of Scotland . This marriage produced two sons, Saer II and Robert de Quincy . It was Robert, the younger son, who was the father of the Saer de Quincy who eventually became Earl of Winchester. By her first husband Robert Fitz Richard , Matilda was also the paternal grandmother of Earl Saer's close ally, Robert Fitzwalter.

Robert de Quincy seems to have inherited no English lands from his father, and pursued a knightly career in Scotland, where he is recorded from around 1160 as a close companion of his cousin, King William the Lion . By 1170 he had married Orabilis , heiress of the Scottish lordship of Leuchars and, through her, he became lord of an extensive complex of estates north of the border which included lands in Fife , Strathearn and Lothian .

Saer de Quincy, the son of Robert de Quincy and Orabilis of Leuchars, was raised largely in Scotland. His absence from English records for the first decades of his life has led some modern historians and genealogists to confuse him with his uncle, Saer II, who took part in the rebellion of Henry the Young King in 1173, when the future Earl of Winchester can have been no more than a toddler. Saer II's line ended without direct heirs, and his nephew and namesake would eventually inherit his estate, uniting his primary Scottish holdings with the family's Northamptonshire patrimony, and possibly some lands in France.

By his wife Margaret de Beaumont, Saer de Quincy had three sons and three daughters:

Lorette who married Sir William de Valognes
Arabella who married Sir Richard Harcourt
Robert (d. 1217). Some sources say he married Hawise, sister and co-heiress of Ranulf de Blundeville, earl of Chester . However, it is more likely Hawise married Saer's brother Robert II;
Roger , who succeeded his father as earl of Winchester (though he did not take formal possession of the earldom until after his mother's death);
Robert de Quincy (second son of that name; d. 1257) who married Helen , daughter of the Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great ;
Hawise, who married Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford .
His arms were: Or, a fess gules, in chief a label of seven points azure.

Noted events in his life were:

• Governor of Castle of Ruil: in Normandy, 1203.

• Created: Earl of Winchester, Bef 1210.

• Magna Charta Surety: 1215.

• Crusader: 1218-1219.

• Siege of Damietta: 1219.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 226 F    i. Lorette de Quincy .

+ 227 M    ii. Robert de Quincy 264 died in 1217.

+ 228 M    iii. Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester 265 was born about 1174 in <Winchester>, Hampshire, England, died on 25 Apr 1264 in England about age 90, and was buried in Brackley, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.

+ 229 M    iv. Robert II de Quincy 266 died in 1257 in <Palestine>.

+ 230 F    v. Hawise de Quincy .267

+ 231 F    vi. Arabella de Quincy 268 was born in 1186 and died in 1258 at age 72.

171. Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester 197 (Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester123, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died about 21 Oct 1204. Another name for Robert was Robert FitzPernel.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester :

Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester (died circa 21 October 1204 ) was an English nobleman, the last of the Beaumont earls of Leicester. He is sometimes known as Robert FitzPernel.
Robert was the son of Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Petronilla, who was either a granddaughter or great-granddaughter of Hugh de Grandmesnil . As a young man, he accompanied King Richard I on the Third Crusade , and it was while the crusading forces rested at Messina , Sicily that Robert was invested with the Earldom of Leicester in early 1191 .

Robert's newly-gained estates included a large part of central Normandy . He held castles at Pacy, Pont-Saint-Pierre and Grandmesnil. Earl Robert also was lord of the vast honor of Breteuil, but the family castle there had been dismantled after the 1173-1174 War . On his return from the crusade, he turned his attentions to the defense of Normandy from the French . After defending Rouen from the advances of Philip II of France , he attempted to retake his castle of Pacy. He was captured by forces of the French king and remained imprisoned for 3 years. Later, King John would bestow the new fortress and lordship of Radepont (the land of Radepont was traded to King John by the seigneur du Neubourg for lands and revenues in the pays de Caux) upon the earl.

Sometime after his release in 1196 he married Loretta, daughter of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber . They had no children, and Robert's death in 1204 brought the end of the Beaumont male line.

In the year of his death Normandy was lost to the French; Earl Robert attempted to come to an independent arrangement with King Philip of France, in which he would hold his land in Normandy as a liege-vassal of the Kings of France, and his lands in England as a liege-vassal of the Kings of England. In any event, Robert died that year, but his great English estates were divided between the heirs of his two sisters. The eldest sister, Amicia, had married the French baron Simon de Montfort , and their son, also named Simon de Montfort , inherited half the estate as well as the title of Earl of Leicester. The younger sister, Margaret, had married Saer de Quincy , and they inherited the other half. Three years later Saer was created Earl of Winchester .

Robert married Loretta de Braose after 1196.

Research Notes: Source: Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester

172. Roger de Beaumont, Bishop of St Andrews (Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester123, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester

Noted events in his life were:

• Became: Bishop of St Andrews, 1189.

173. William de Beaumont (Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester123, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester - a leper

174. Amicia de Beaumont (Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester123, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester - Married Simon III de Montfort. Their son Simon subsequently became Earl of Leicester.

175. Amice FitzWilliam, Countess of Gloucester 198 (Hawise de Beaumont, of Leicester124, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1160 and died on 1 Jan 1225 about age 65. Other names for Amice were Amica FitzRobert and Amice FitzRobert Countess of Gloucester.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots has. d. 1 Jan 1224/1225. Wikipedia has d. 1220.

Research Notes: Second daughter and co-heiress of William FitzRobert.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 63-27

Amice married Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Clare,269 son of Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford and Maud de St. Hilary, about 1180. Richard was born about 1153 in Tonbridge Castle, Tonbridge, Kent, England, died on 30 Dec 1218 in Oxfordshire, England about age 65, and was buried in Clare or Tunbridge Priory.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots has. d. 28 Nov 1217. Magna Charta Barons & Wikipedia have 30 Dec 1218.

Research Notes: 4th Earl of Hertford, 6th Earl of Clare, Earl of Gloucester.

Sources are fairly certain that this is the Richard de Clare who was a Magna Charta Surety.

----------
From Wikipedia - Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford :

Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford (c.1153[1] - December 30 , 1218 ) was the son of Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford and Maud de St. Hilary. More commonly known as the Earl of Clare, he had the moiety of the Giffard estates from his ancestor Rohese. He was present at the coronation of King Richard I at Westminster , 3 September 1189 , and King John on 27 May 1199 . He was also present at the homeage of King William of Scotland at Lincoln.
He married (c. 1172) Amice FitzRobert, Countess of Gloucester (c. 1160-1220), second daughter, and co-heiress, of William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester , and Hawise de Beaumont.

He sided with the Barons against King John , even though he had previously sworn peace with the King at Northampton , and his castle of Tonbridge was taken. He played a leading part in the negotiations for Magna Carta , being one of the twenty five Barons appointed as guardians. On 9 November 1215 , he was one of the commissioners on the part of the Barons to negotiate the peace with the King. In 1215, his lands in counties Cambridge , Norfolk , Suffolk and Essex were granted to Robert de Betun . He and his son were among the Barons rxcommunicated by the Pope in 1215. Sometime before 1198 Earl Richard and his wife Amice were ordered to separate by the Pope on grounds of consanguinity . They separated for a time because of this order but apparently they reconciled their marriage with the Pope later on.

His own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.

Noted events in his life were:

• Magna Charta Surety: 1215.

• 4th Earl of Hertford: 1173-1218.

• x:

Children from this marriage were:

+ 232 F    i. Isabel de Clare 270 was born in 1178.

+ 233 M    ii. Sir Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester 271 was born about 1180 in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England, died on 25 Oct 1230 in Penros, Brittany, France about age 50, and was buried in Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

+ 234 F    iii. Maud de Clare 272 was born in 1184 in Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England and died in 1213 at age 29.

+ 235 M    iv. Richard de Clare 270 was born in 1184 in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England and died on 4 Mar 1228 in London, England at age 44.

+ 236 F    v. Joan de Clare 273 was born in 1184 in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England.

176. Mabel de Beaumont 145 (Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan127, Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan83, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1168 in <Meulan, Normandy>, France and died after 1 May 1204. Another name for Mabel was Mabirie de Beaumont.

Mabel married William de Reviers,145 son of Baldwin de Reviers and Adeliza Lucia DeBaalum, about 1189 in France. William was born about 1128 in <Devonshire>, England, died on 10 Sep 1217 about age 89, and was buried in Christ Church, Twynham, Dorset, England. Another name for William was William de Vernon.

Birth Notes: FamilySearch has abt 1128 and abt 1155.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 237 F    i. Mary de Reviers 145 was born about 1183 in <Okehampton>, Devonshire, England.

177. Alice de Beaumont 201 (Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick128, Gundred de Warenne89, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died between 1246 and 1263.

Alice married William Mauduit, Lord of Hanslope & Hartley Mauduit, Bucks.,274 son of Robert Mauduit, Lord of Hanslope, Bucks. and Isabel Basset,. William died in Apr 1257.

Noted events in his life were:

• Chamberlain of the Exchequer:

Children from this marriage were:

+ 238 F    i. Isabel Mauduit 275 was born about 1214, died before 1268, and was buried in Nunnery of Cokehill, Worcestershire, England.

+ 239 M    ii. William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick 276 was born about 1220 and died on 8 Jan 1267 about age 47.

178. Elena de Morville 202 (Avice de Lancaster129, Gundred de Warenne89, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1172 in <Kirkoswald, Cumberland, England>, died on 11 Jun 1217 about age 45, and was buried in Abbey of Dundrennan, Kirkcudbright, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland. Another name for Elena was Helena de Morville.

Elena married Roland, Lord of Galloway,223 son of Uchtred, Lord of Galloway and Gunnild, of Dunbar,. Roland was born about 1164 in <Galloway, Perthshire, Scotland>, died on 19 Dec 1200 in Northamptonshire, England about age 36, and was buried in Abbey of Saint Andrew, Northamptonshire, England. Another name for Roland was Roland of Galloway.

Noted events in his life were:

• Constable of Scotland: 1189-1200.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 240 M    i. Alan, Lord of Galloway 207 was born about 1186 in <Galloway, Wigtownshire, Scotland>, died in 1234 about age 48, and was buried in Abbey of Dundrennan, Kirkcudbright, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland.

179. William de Morville 203 (Avice de Lancaster129, Gundred de Warenne89, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in 1196.

180. Maud de Warenne 204 (Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey131, William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne90, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1162 and died before 13 Dec 1228. Another name for Maud was Mathilde de Warenne.

Death Notes: May have died in 1212.

Maud married Henry, Count of Eu, Lord of Hastings.277 Henry died on 11 Mar 1183. Another name for Henry was Henry d'Eu 7th Comte d'Eu, 3rd Lord of Hastings.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots has d. 16 or 17 Mar. 1183 and d. 11 Mar. 1183

Wikipedia has d. 11 Mar 1183 or 1191.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 241 F    i. Alice d'Eu, Countess of Eu, Lady of Hastings 278 was born about 1191 and died on 15 May 1246 in La Mothe-Saint-Heray, Poitou about age 55.

181. William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey131, William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne90, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1174 in Surrey, England, died on 27 May 1240 in London, England about age 66, and was buried in Lewes Priory, Lewes, Sussex, England.

Research Notes: Second husband of Maud Marshal.

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872177 :

5th Earl of Surrey (1202-1240); warden of the Cinque Ports (1216); named in the Magna Carta. William's estates in Normandy were confiscated in 1204, when Philip II of France (RIN # 4649) seized the duchy. He supported King John of England against the barons and in 1215 acted as one of the king's guarantors for the keeping of the Magna Carta. However, the following year he supported Prince Louis, son of Philip II of France, when he tried to wrest England from John; even so, after the King's death later that year he declared himself a loyal vassal of his infant son and successor, Henry III. His lands were restored in 1221. During the 1220's and 1230's William took an active part in politics, and in 1238 he was appointed a treasurer of royal taxes.

!Chronicles of the Age of Chivalry: 52
To compensate for the loss of his lands in Normandy, King John granted William Grantham and Stamford in Lincolnshire. In 1212, he was committed to the custody of 4 castles, Bamburgh and Newcastle-on-Tyne being two of them. In 1237, William was reprimanded by the Bishop of Lincoln for having mass at his home at Grantham, because it had not been consecrated.

William married Maud Marshal,279 daughter of Sir William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, on 13 Oct 1225. Maud was born about 1192 in <Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales>, was christened in Sep 1201, died on 27 Mar 1248 about age 56, and was buried in Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales. Another name for Maud was Matilda Marshall.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots also has d. Apr 1248.

Research Notes: 2nd wife of William de Warenne. Widow of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 242 M    i. John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey 280 was born in 1231 in Surrey, England, died on 27 Dec 1304 in Kennington, Middlesex, England at age 73, and was buried in Lewes, Surrey, England.

182. Henry de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford 206 (Margaret, of Huntingdon132, Ada de Warenne91, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1176 and died on 1 Jun 1220 at age 44.

Death Notes: Died on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land

Research Notes: From Magna Charta Barons, pp. 81-82:
Henry de Bohun, eldest son and heir, who in reality was the first Earl of Hereford of this family, being so created by charter of King John, dated April 28, 1199; but the office of lord high constable he inherited. As he took prominent part with the Barons against the king, his lands were sequestered, but he received them again at the sealing of the Magna Charta. He was elected one of the celebrated twenty-five Sureties for the observance of the Magna Charta, and having been excommunicated by the Pope, with the other Barons, he did not return to his allegiance on the decease of King John, but was one of the commanders in the army of Louis, the Dauphin, at the battle of Lincoln, and was taken prisoner. After this defeat he joined Saher de Quincey, and others, in a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, and c. on the passage, June 1, 1220, 4 Henry III. His body was brought home and buried in the chapter-house of Llanthony Abbey, in Gloucestershire.

He m. Maud, daughter of Geoffrey Fitz-Piers, Baron de Mandeville, created, in 1199, Earl of Essex, Justiciary of England, d. 1212, and eventually heiress of her brother William de Mandeville, last Earl of Essex of that family, by whom he acquired the honor of Essex and many extensive lordships, and sister of Geoffrey de Mandeville, one of the celebrated twenty-five Magna Charta Sureties, and had:
Humphrey de Bohun, second Earl of Hereford and Essex.
Margaret, wife of Waleran de Newburgh, fourth Earl of Warwick.
Ralph de Bohun.

Noted events in his life were:

• Hereditary Constable of England:

• Sheriff of Kent: 1200.

• Magna Charta Surety: 1215.

Henry married Maud FitzGeoffrey, de Mandeville,281 daughter of Geoffrey FitzPeter, 1st Earl of Essex and Beatrice de Say,. Maud died on 27 Aug 1236.

Research Notes: After Henry's death (1220), Countess of Essex


The child from this marriage was:

+ 243 M    i. Humphrey V de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford, 7th Earl of Essex 282 was born by 1208, died on 24 Sep 1275 in Warwickshire, England at age 67, and was buried in Llanthony Secunda, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

183. Mathilde, of Flanders 208 (Matthew, of Alsace, Count of Boulogne133, Thierry I, of Lorraine, Count of Flanders94, Gertrude, of Flanders54, Robert I, Count of Flanders29, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died between 1210 and 1211. Other names for Mathilde were Maud of Flanders and Maud of Boulogne and Alsace.

Mathilde married Henry I, Duke of Lorraine, Louvain and Brabant,283 son of Godfrey III, Count of Louvain, Duke of Lorraine and Margaret, of Limbourg, in 1179. Henry was born about 1165 in Leuven, Brabant, Flanders, Belgium and died on 5 Sep 1235 in Cologne, Germany about age 70.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Henry I, Duke of Brabant :

Henry I of Brabant (French: Henri I de Brabant, Dutch: Hendrik I van Brabant), named "The Courageous", was (probably) born in 1165 in Leuven and died in the German city of Cologne on September 5 , 1235 . He became Duke of Brabant in 1183/1184 and succeeded his father as Duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1190. He was the son of Godfrey III of Leuven , Duke of Lower Lotharingia and landgrave of Brabant , and Margaret of Limburg .
He married Mathilde of Boulogne (Mathilde of Flanders), daughter of Marie of Boulogne and Matthew of Alsace 1179.

He had six children by his first marriage:
Marie (c. 1190 - May 1260), married in Maastricht after May 19 , 1214 Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor , married July 1220 Count William I of Holland
Adelaide (b. c. 1190), married 1206 Arnulf, Count of Loos , married February 3 , 1225 William X of Auvergne (c. 1195-1247), married before April 21 , 1251 Arnold van Wesemaele (d. aft. 1288)
Margaret (1192-1231), married January 1206 Gerhard III, Count of Guelders (d. October 22 , 1229 )
Mathilde (c. 1200 - December 22 , 1267 ), married in Aachen in 1212 Henry II, Count Palatine of the Rhine (d. 1214), married on December 6 , 1214 Floris IV, Count of Holland
Henry II of Brabant (1207-1248)
Godfrey (1209 - January 21 , 1254 ), Lord of Gaesbeek, married Marie van Oudenaarde

His second marriage was at April 22 , 1213 in Soissons to Marie, princess of France , daughter of King Philip II of France . They had two children:
Elizabeth (d. October 23 , 1272 ), married in Leuven March 19 , 1233 Count Dietrich of Cleves , Lord of Dinslaken (c. 1214-1244), married 1246 Gerhard II, Count of Wassenberg (d. 1255)
Marie, died young

Under Henry I, there was a town policy and town planning. Henry's attention went out to those regions that lent themselves to the extension of his sovereignty and in some locations he used the creation of a new town as an instrument in the political organisation of the area. Among the towns to which the Duke gave city rights and trade privileges was 's-Hertogenbosch .
He was buried in St. Peter's chapter church at Leuven where you can still see his late romanesque effigy.

Noted events in his life were:

• Duke of Brabant: 1184.

• Duke of Lower Lotharingia: 1190.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 244 M    i. Henry II, Duke of Brabant 284 was born in 1207 and died on 1 Feb 1248 in Leuven, Brabant, Flanders, Belgium at age 41.

184. Yolanda, of Flanders 210 (Margaret I, of Flanders135, Thierry I, of Lorraine, Count of Flanders94, Gertrude, of Flanders54, Robert I, Count of Flanders29, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1175 and died in 1219 at age 44.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Yolanda of Flanders :

Yolanda of Flanders (1175-1219) ruled the Latin Empire in Constantinople for her husband Peter II of Courtenay from 1217 to 1219.

She was the daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Hainault , and Countess Margaret I of Flanders . Two of her brothers, Baldwin I and then Henry , were emperors in Constantinople. After the death of the latter in 1216 there was a brief period without an emperor, before Peter was elected. Peter sent Yolanda to Constantinople while he fought the Despotate of Epirus , during which he was captured. Because his fate was unknown (although he was probably killed), Yolanda ruled as regent. She allied with the Bulgarians against the various Byzantine successor states, and was able to make peace with Theodore I Lascaris of the Empire of Nicaea , who married her daughter. However, she soon died, in 1219.

She was succeeded by her second son Robert of Courtenay because her first son did not want the throne. As Robert was still in France at the time, there was technically no emperor until he arrived in 1221.

Yolanda also held Namur , which she inherited from her uncle Philip of Namur in 1212 and left to her eldest son Philip when she went to Constantinople in 1216.

By Peter of Courtenay she had 10 children:
Philip (d. 1226), Marquis of Namur, who declined the offer of the crown of the Latin Empire
Robert of Courtenay (d. 1228), Latin Emperor
Henry (d. 1229), Marquis of Namur
Baldwin II of Constantinople (d. 1273)
Margaret , Marchioness of Namur, who married first Raoul d'Issoudun and then Henry count of Vianden
Elizabeth, who married Walter count of Bar and then Eudes sire of Montagu
Yolanda de Courtenay , who married Andrew II of Hungary
Eleanor, who married Philip of Montfort, Lord of Tyre
Marie de Courtenay , who married Theodore I Lascaris of the Empire of Nicaea
Agnes, who married Geoffrey II Villehardouin , Prince of Achaea

Noted events in her life were:

• Ruled: the Latin Empire in Constantinople for her husband, 1217-1219.

Yolanda married Pierre de Courtenay.285 Pierre died in 1219. Another name for Pierre was Peter of Courtenay.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Peter II of Courtenay :

Peter of Courtenay French : Pierre de Courtenay (died 1219) was emperor of the Latin Empire of Constantinople from 1216-1217.

He was a son of Peter of Courtenay (d. 1183), the youngest son of Louis VI of France and his second Queen consort Adélaide de Maurienne . His mother was Elizabeth of Courtenay.

Peter first married Agnes of Nevers, via whom he obtained the three counties of Nevers , Auxerre , and Tonnerre . He took for his second wife, Yolanda of Flanders (d. 1219), a sister of Baldwin and Henry of Flanders , who were afterwards the first and second emperors of the Latin Empire of Constantinople. Peter accompanied his cousin, King Philip Augustus , on the crusade of 1190 and fought (alongside his brother Robert) in the Albigensian Crusade in 1209 and 1211, when he took part in the siege of Lavaur . He was present at the Battle of Bouvines in 1214.

When his brother-in-law, the emperor Henry , died without sons in 1216, Peter was chosen as his successor, and with a small army set out from France to take possession of his throne. Consecrated emperor at Rome, in a church outside the walls, by Pope Honorius III on April 9 , 1217 , he borrowed some ships from the Venetians, promising in return to conquer Durazzo for them; but he failed in this enterprise, and sought to make his way to Constantinople by land. On the journey he was seized by the despot of Epirus , Theodore Komnenos Doukas , and, after an imprisonment of two years, died, probably by foul means. Peter thus never governed his empire, which, however, was ruled for a time by his wife, Yolanda, who had succeeded in reaching Constantinople. Two of his sons, Robert and Baldwin , in turn held the throne of the Latin Empire.

Children
By his first wife Agnes of Nevers he had one child, Mahaut de Courtenay (Maud, Matilda, d. 1254), countess of Nevers, Auxerre and Tonerre.

By his second wife Yolanda of Flanders , he had 10 children:
Philip (d. 1226), Marquis of Namur, who declined the offer of the crown of the Latin Empire
Robert of Courtenay (d. 1228), Latin Emperor
Henry (d. 1229), Marquis of Namur
Baldwin II of Constantinople (d. 1273)
Margaret , Marchioness of Namur, who married first Raoul d'Issoudun and then Henry count of Vianden
Elizabeth, who married Walter count of Bar and then Eudes sire of Montagu
Yolanda de Courtenay , who married Andrew II of Hungary
Eleanor, who married Philip of Montfort, Lord of Tyre
Marie de Courtenay , who married Theodore I Lascaris of the Empire of Nicaea
Agnes, who married Geoffrey II Villehardouin , Prince of Achaea

Noted events in his life were:

• Emperor: of the Latin Empire of Constantinople, 1216-1217.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 245 F    i. Yolanda de Courtenay 286 was born about 1200 and died in 1233 about age 33.

185. Guy I, Vicomte de Troyes 212 (Isabel de Montlhéry, Viscomtessa de Troyes137, Lithuaise96, Adela, of Normandy55, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in 1151. Another name for Guy was Gautier I de Moëlan.

Noted events in his life were:

• Seigneur de Dampierre:

• Seigneur de St. Dizier:

• Seigneur de Moëlan:

• Seigneur de St. Just:

Guy married Helvide de Baudement,287 daughter of Andre de Baudement and Unknown, Betw 1120 and 1125. Other names for Helvide were Helvis de Baudement and Helvide de Baudemont.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 246 F    i. Helvis de Dampierre 288 died after 1295.

186. Eleanor, of England 213 (Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England138, Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 13 Oct 1162 in Domfront, Normandy and died on 31 Oct 1214 at age 52. Another name for Eleanor was Leonora of England and Aquitaine.

Birth Notes: Ancestral Roots has b. 1162 and b. 1161

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Eleanor of England (1162-1214) :

Eleanor of England (known in Castilian as Leonora; 13 October 1162 - 31 October 1214) was Queen of Castile and Toledo as wife of Alfonso VIII of Castile .

She was born in the castle at Domfront , Normandy , and was baptised by Henry of Marcy . She was the sixth child and second daughter of King Henry II of England and his wife Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine . Her godfather was the chronicler Robert of Torigny , who had a special interest in her and recorded her life as best he could. She received her first name as a namesake of her mother, whose name "Eleanor" (or Alienor) had previously been unrecorded though may have been related to the Greek Helen or the Italian Elena . Another view holds that in the Occitan language , Eleanor simply meant "the other Aenor," since Eleanor of Aquitaine was named for her mother, called Aenor .

Eleanor was a younger maternal half-sister of Marie de Champagne and Alix of France . She was a younger sister of William IX, Count of Poitiers , Henry the Young King , Matilda, Duchess of Saxony , Richard I of England and Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany . She was also an older sister of Joan of Sicily and John of England .

When she was eighteen years old, in September 1180, she was married to Alfonso VIII . The marriage was arranged to secure the Pyrennean border, with Gascony offered as her dowry.

Of all Eleanor of Aquitaine's daughters, her namesake Eleanor best inherited her mother's political influence. She was almost as powerful as her husband, who specified in his will that she was to rule alongside their son in the event of his death. It was she who persuaded him to marry their daughter Berenguela to the king of Leon in the interest of peace.

When Alfonso died, his queen was reportedly so devastated with grief that she was unable to preside over the burial. Their daughter Berenguela instead performed these honors. Leonora then took sick and died only twenty-eight days after her husband, and was buried at Las Huelgas abbey in Burgos.

Children
Berenguela, Queen of Castile (August 1180 - 8 November 1246 ), married King Alfonso IX of Leon
Sancho of Castile (born & died 1181)
Sancha of Castile (1182 - 3 February 1184 )
Henry of Castile (born & died 1184)
Urraca of Castile (1186-1220), married King Alfonso II of Portugal
Blanca of Castile (4 March 1188 - 26 November 1252 ), married King Louis VIII of France
Fernando of Castile (29 September 1189 - 1211)
Mafalda of Castile (1191-1204)
Constance of Castile (1195-1198)
Constanza, nun at Las Huelgas (1201-1243)
Eleanor of Castile , married King James I of Aragon
Henry I, King of Castile (14 April 1204 - 1217)

Eleanor married Alfonso VIII "the Noble", King of Castile,235 son of Sancho III, of Castile and Blanca Garcés, of Navarre, in Sep 1180. Alfonso was born on 11 Nov 1155 and died on 5 Oct 1214 at age 58. Other names for Alfonso were Alfonso VIII "the Good" King of Castile and El de las Navas.

Marriage Notes: Ancestral Roots has m. 1177.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Alfonso VIII of Castile :
Alfonso VIII (11 November 1155 - 5 October 1214 ), called the Noble or el de las Navas, was the King of Castile from 1158 to his death and King of Toledo [1]. He is most remembered for his part in the Reconquista and the downfall of the Almohad Caliphate . After having suffered a great defeat with his own army at Alarcos against the Almohads, he led the coalition of Christian princes and foreign crusaders who broke the power of the Almohads in the Battle of the Navas de Tolosa in 1212, an event which marked the arrival of an irreversible tide of Christian supremacy on the Iberian peninsula .
His reign saw the domination of Castile over León and, by his alliance with Aragon, he drew those two spheres of Christian Iberia into close connection.


Regency and civil war
Alfonso was born to Sancho III of Castile and Blanca , daughter of García Ramírez of Navarre , in Soria on 11 November 1155. He was named after his grandfather Alfonso VII . His early life resembled that of other medieval kings. His father died in 1158 when his mother was also dead. Though proclaimed king when only three years of age, he was regarded as a mere name by the unruly nobles to whom a minority was convenient. Immediately, Castile was plunged into conflicts between the various noble houses vying for ascendancy in the inevitable regency. The devotion of a squire of his household, who carried him on the pommel of his saddle to the stronghold of San Esteban de Gormaz , saved him from falling into the hands of the contending factions. The noble houses of Lara and Castro both claimed the regency, as did the boy's uncle, Ferdinand II of León . In March 1160 the former two families met at the Battle of Lobregal and the Castro were victorious.
Alfonso was put in the custody of the loyal village Ávila . At barely fifteen, he came forth to do a man's work by restoring his kingdom to order. It was only by a surprise that he recovered his capital Toledo from the hands of the Laras.

[edit ] Reconquista
In 1174, he ceded Uclés to the Order of Santiago and afterwards this became the order's principal seat. From Uclés, he began a campaign which culminated in the reconquest of Cuenca in 1177. The city surrendered on 21 September , the feast of Saint Matthew , ever afterwards celebrated by the citizens of the town.
Alfonso took the initiative to ally all the major Christian kingdoms of the peninsula - Navarre , León , Portugal , and Aragon - against the Almohads . By the Treaty of Cazola of 1179, the zones of expansion of each kingdom were defined.
After founding Plasencia (Cáceres ) in 1186, he embarked on a major initiative to unite the Castilian nobility around the Reconquista. In that year, he recuperated part of La Rioja from the Kingdom of Navarre .
In 1195, after the treaty with the Almohads was broken, he came to the defence of Alarcos on the river Guadiana , then the principal Castilian town in the region. At the subsequent Battle of Alarcos , he was roundly defeated by the caliph Abu Yaqub Yusuf al-Mansur . The reoccupation of the surrounding territory by the Almohads was quickly commenced with Calatrava falling first. For the next seventeen years, the frontier between Moor and Castilian was fixed in the hill country just outside Toledo.
Finally, in 1212, through the mediation of Pope Innocent III , a crusade was called against the Almohads. Castilians under Alfonso, Aragonese and Catalans under Peter II , Navarrese under Sancho VII , and Franks under the archbishop Arnold of Narbonne all flocked to the effort. The military orders also lent their support. Calatrava first, then Alarcos, and finally Benavente were captured before a final battle was fought at Las Navas de Tolosa near Santa Elena on 16 July . The caliph Muhammad an-Nasir was routed and Almohad power broken.

[edit ] Cultural legacy

Tombs of Alfonso and Eleanor
Alfonso was the founder of the first Spanish university, a studium generale at Palencia , which, however, did not survive him. His court also served as an important instrument for Spanish cultural achievement. His marriage (Burgos , September 1180) with Eleanor (Leonora), daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine , brought him under the influence of the greatest governing intellect of his time. Troubadours and sages were always present, largely due to the influence of Eleanor.
Alfonso died at Gutierre-Muñoz and was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, Henry I , named after his maternal grandfather.


[edit ] Children
With Eleanor, (Leonora of England ) he had 11 children:
Berenguela , or Berengaria, (August 1180 - 8 November 1246 ), married Alfonso IX of Leon
Sancho (1181)
Sancha (1182 - 3 February 1184 )
Henry (1184)
Urraca (1186 - 1220), married Alfonso II of Portugal
Blanch (4 March 1188 - 26 November 1252 ), married Louis VIII of France
Ferdinand (29 September 1189 - 1211), on whose behalf Diego of Acebo and the future Saint Dominic travelled to Denmark in 1203 to secure a bride[2]
Mafalda (1191 - 1204)
Constance (1195 - 1243), abbess of Santa María la Real of Las Huelgas
Eleanor (1200 - 1244), married James I of Aragon
Henry I (14 April 1204 - 1217), successor

Noted events in his life were:

• King of Castile: 1158-1214.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 247 F    i. Blanche, of Castile 289 was born on 4 Mar 1188 in Palencia, (Palencia, Castile-Léon), Spain and died on 26 Nov 1252 in Paris, (Île-de-France), France at age 64.


187. KingJohn "Lackland", of England 214 (Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England138, Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 24 Dec 1167 in Beaumont Palace, Oxford, England, died on 19 Oct 1216 in Newark Castle, Lincolnshire, England at age 48, and was buried in Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Worcestershire, England. Other names for John were John King of England and John "Lackland" King of England.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - John of England :

John (24 December 1166 - 19 October 1216 [1]) reigned as King of England from 6 April 1199 , until his death. He succeeded to the throne as the younger brother of King Richard I (known in later times as "Richard the Lionheart"). John acquired the nicknames of "Lackland" (French : Sans Terre) for his lack of an inheritance as the youngest son and for his loss of territory to France , and of "Soft-sword" for his alleged military ineptitude.[2] He was a Plantagenet or Angevin king.

Apart from entering popular legend as the enemy of the fictional Robin Hood , he is also known for acquiescing to the nobility and signing Magna Carta , a document that limited his power and that is popularly regarded as an early first step in the evolution of modern democracy .

Born at Beaumont Palace , Oxford , John was the fifth son and last of eight children born to Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine . He was almost certainly born in 1166 instead of 1167, as is sometimes claimed.[3]
He was a younger maternal half-brother of Marie de Champagne and Alix of France , his mother's children by her first marriage to Louis VII of France , which was later annulled. He was a younger brother of William, Count of Poitiers ; Henry the Young King ; Matilda, Duchess of Saxony ; Richard I of England ; Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany ; Leonora, Queen of Castile ; and Joan, Queen of Sicily


Early life
While John was his father's favourite son, as the youngest he could expect no inheritance . His family life was tumultuous, as his older brothers all became involved in repeated rebellions against Henry . Eleanor was imprisoned by Henry in 1173, when John was a small boy.

As a child, John was betrothed to Alys (pronounced 'Alice'), daughter and heiress of Humbert III of Savoy . It was hoped that by this marriage the Angevin dynasty would extend its influence beyond the Alps , because John was promised the inheritance of Savoy , the Piemonte , Maurienne , and the other possessions of Count Humbert. King Henry promised his young son castles in Normandy which had been previously promised to his brother Geoffrey, which was for some time a bone of contention between King Henry and his son Geoffrey. Alys made the trip over the Alps and joined Henry's court, but she died before being married.

Gerald of Wales relates that King Henry had a curious painting in a chamber of Winchester Castle , depicting an eagle being attacked by three of its chicks, while a fourth chick crouched, waiting for its chance to strike. When asked the meaning of this picture, King Henry said:

The four young ones of the eagle are my four sons, who will not cease persecuting me even unto death. And the youngest, whom I now embrace with such tender affection, will someday afflict me more grievously and perilously than all the others.

Before his accession, John had already acquired a reputation for treachery, having conspired sometimes with and sometimes against his elder brothers, Henry, Richard and Geoffrey. In 1184, John and Richard both claimed that they were the rightful heir to Aquitaine, one of many unfriendly encounters between the two. In 1185, John became the ruler of Ireland , whose people grew to despise him, causing John to leave after only eight months...

Death

Retreating from the French invasion, John took a safe route around the marshy area of the Wash to avoid the rebel held area of East Anglia . His slow baggage train (including the Crown Jewels ), however, took a direct route across it and was lost to the unexpected incoming tide. This dealt John a terrible blow, which affected his health and state of mind. Succumbing to dysentery and moving from place to place, he stayed one night at Sleaford Castle before dying on 18 October (or possibly 19 October ) 1216 , at Newark Castle (then in Lincolnshire , now on Nottinghamshire 's border with that county). Numerous, possibly fictitious, accounts circulated soon after his death that he had been killed by poisoned ale, poisoned plums or a "surfeit of peaches".

He was buried in Worcester Cathedral in the city of Worcester .
His nine-year-old son succeeded him and became King Henry III of England (1216-72), and although Louis continued to claim the English throne, the barons switched their allegiance to the new king, forcing Louis to give up his claim and sign the Treaty of Lambeth in 1217.

Legacy

King John's reign has been traditionally characterised as one of the most disastrous in English history: it began with defeats-he lost Normandy to Philip Augustus of France in his first five years on the throne-and ended with England torn by civil war and himself on the verge of being forced out of power. In 1213, he made England a papal fief to resolve a conflict with the Roman Catholic Church , and his rebellious barons forced him to sign Magna Carta in 1215, the act for which he is best remembered...


Marriage and issue
In 1189, John was married to Isabel of Gloucester , daughter and heiress of William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester (she is given several alternative names by history, including Avisa, Hawise, Joan, and Eleanor). They had no children, and John had their marriage annulled on the grounds of consanguinity , some time before or shortly after his accession to the throne, which took place on 6 April 1199 , and she was never acknowledged as queen. (She then married Geoffrey FitzGeoffrey de Mandeville, 2nd Earl of Essex as her second husband and Hubert de Burgh as her third).
John remarried, on 24 August 1200 , Isabella of Angoulême , who was twenty years his junior. She was the daughter of Aymer Taillefer , Count of Angouleme. John had kidnapped her from her fiancé, Hugh X of Lusignan .
Isabella bore five children:
Henry III (1207-1272), King of England.
Richard (1209-1272), 1st Earl of Cornwall.
Joan (1210-1238), Queen Consort of Alexander II of Scotland .
Isabella (1214-1241), Consort of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor .
Eleanor (1215-1275), who married William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke , and later married Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester .

John is given a great taste for lechery by the chroniclers of his age, and even allowing some embellishment, he did have many illegitimate children. Matthew Paris accuses him of being envious of many of his barons and kinsfolk, and seducing their more attractive daughters and sisters. Roger of Wendover describes an incident that occurred when John became enamoured of Margaret, the wife of Eustace de Vesci and an illegitimate daughter of King William I of Scotland . Eustace substituted a prostitute in her place when the king came to Margaret's bed in the dark of night; the next morning, when John boasted to Vesci of how good his wife was in bed, Vesci confessed and fled.
John had the following illegitimate children:
Joan, Lady of Wales , the wife of Prince Llywelyn Fawr of Wales , (by a woman named Clemence)
Richard Fitz Roy , (by his cousin, Adela, daughter of his uncle Hamelin de Warenne )
Oliver FitzRoy, (by a mistress named Hawise) who accompanied the papal legate Pelayo to Damietta in 1218, and never returned.
By an unknown mistress (or mistresses) John fathered:
Geoffrey FitzRoy, who went on expedition to Poitou in 1205 and died there.
John FitzRoy, a clerk in 1201.
Henry FitzRoy, who died in 1245.
Osbert Gifford, who was given lands in Oxfordshire, Norfolk, Suffolk , and Sussex , and is last seen alive in 1216.
Eudes FitzRoy, who accompanied his half-brother Richard on Crusade and died in the Holy Land in 1241.
Bartholomew FitzRoy, a member of the order of Friars Preachers .
Maud FitzRoy, Abbess of Barking , who died in 1252.
Isabel FitzRoy, wife of Richard Fitz Ives .
Philip FitzRoy, found living in 1263.
(The surname of FitzRoy is Norman-French for son of the king.)



Noted events in his life were:

• Crowned: King of England, 1199. King of England 1199-1216

John married Isabella, of Angoulême, daughter of Aymar "Taillifer", de Valence, Comté d'Angoulême and Alix de Courtenay, on 10 May 1200. Isabella was born about 1186, died on 31 May 1246 in Fontévrault Abbey, France about age 60, and was buried in Fontévrault Abbey, France. Other names for Isabella were Isabel d'Angoulême and Isabella Taillefer of Angoulême.

Marriage Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 153A-28 has m. John 10 May 1200, but line 117-27 has m. 24 Aug 1200.

Noted events in their marriage were:

• Marriage: possibly, 24 Aug 1200, Bordeaux, France.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 117-27 has b. abt. 1189, d. 3 or 4 June 1246, but line 153A-28 (new to 8th edition) has b. 1187, d. 31 May 1246.

From Wikipedia - Isabella of Angoulême :

Isabella of Angoulême (Fr. Isabelle d'Angoulême ; c. 1187 - May 31 , 1246 ) was countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England .
She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillifer, Count of Angoulême , by Alix de Courtenay ; her maternal great-grandfather was King Louis VI of France . She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202 , by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on August 24 , 1200 , at Bordeaux , a year after he annulled his first marriage. At the time of this marriage Isabella was aged about thirteen, and her beauty was renowned; she is sometimes called the "Helen " of the Middle Ages by historians.
It could not be said to have been a successful marriage, as Isabella was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Before their marriage, she had been betrothed to Hugh X of Lusignan [1], son of the then Count of La Marche . As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all his French lands, and armed conflict ensued.
When John died in 1216 , Isabella was still in her twenties. She returned to France and in 1220 proceeded to marry Hugh X of Lusignan, now Count of La Marche, her former fiancé.
Isabella was accused of plotting against the French king in 1244 ; she fled to Fontevrault Abbey , where she died on May 31 , 1246 , and was buried there. Afterwards most of her many children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of their half-brother King Henry III.


Issue
With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:
King Henry III of England (b. 1207 - d. 1272 )
Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (b. 1209 - d. 1272 )
Joan (b. 1210 - d. 1238 ), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland
Isabella (b. 1214 - d. 1241 ), the wife of Emperor Frederick II
Eleanor (b. 1215 - d. 1275 ), who would marry William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke
With Hugh X of Lusignan , the Count of La Marche : 9 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:
Hugh XI of Lusignan (b. 1221 - d.1250 ), Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulême
Aymer de Valence (b. 1222 - d. 1260 ), Bishop of Winchester
Agnès de Lusignan (b. 1223 - d. 1269 ), married William II de Chauvigny
Alice de Lusignan (b. 1224 - d. February 9 , 1256 ), married John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey
Guy de Lusignan (b. 1225 ? - d. 1264 ), killed at the Battle of Lewes . (Tufton Beamish maintains that he escaped to France after the Battle of Lewes and died there in 1269)
Geoffrey de Lusignan (b. 1226 ? - d. 1274 ), married in 1259 Jeanne, Viscountess of Châtellerault and had issue
William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke (b. 1228 ? - d. 1296 )
Marguerite de Lusignan (b. 1229 ? - d. 1288 ), married 1243 Raymond VII of Toulouse , married c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars
Isabelle de Lusignan (1234 - January 14 , 1299 ), married Geoffrey de Rancon

References
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 1-25, 80-29, 117-27, 153A-28, 154-28, 258-27, 260-29, 275-27
Isabelle d'Angoulême, Reine d'Angleterre, by Sophie Fougère
Isabella: Queen Without a Conscience, by Rachel Bard (historical novel)


Children from this marriage were:

+ 248 M    i. KingHenry III, of England 290 was born on 1 Oct 1207 in Winchester Castle, Winchester, (Hampshire), England, died on 16 Nov 1272 in Westminster Palace, London, England at age 65, and was buried in Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England.

+ 249 M    ii. Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, King of the Romans was born on 5 Jan 1209 and died on 2 Apr 1272 at age 63.

+ 250 F    iii. Joan, Queen Consort of Scotland 291 was born in 1210 and died in 1238 at age 28.

+ 251 F    iv. Isabella was born in 1214 and died in 1241 at age 27.

+ 252 F    v. Eleanor was born in 1215 and died on 13 Apr 1275 at age 60.

John had a relationship with Clemence. This couple did not marry.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - John of England


Their child was:

+ 253 F    i. Joan, Princess of Gwynedd 292 was born before 1200 and died between 30 Mar 1236 and Feb 1237.

188. William Longspée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury 216 (Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England138, Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1176 in England, died on 7 Mar 1226 in Salisbury Castle, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England about age 50, and was buried in Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England. Another name for William was wILLIAM Longespée 3rd Earl of Salisbury.

Research Notes: Illegitimate son of Henry II, probably through Countess Ida.

From Wikipedia - William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury :

William Longespée, jure uxoris 3rd Earl of Salisbury (c. 1176 - 7 March 1226 ) was an English noble, primarily remembered for his command of the English forces at the Battle of Damme and for remaining loyal to King John .

He was an illegitimate son of Henry II of England . His mother was unknown for many years, until the discovery of a charter of William mentioning "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (engl. "Countess Ida, my mother")[2] [3]


This Ida, a member of the prominent Tosny or Toesny family, later (1181) married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk [4].

King Henry acknowledged William as his son and gave him the Honour of Appleby, Lincolnshire in 1188. Eight years later, his half-brother, King Richard I , married him to a great heiress, Ela, Countess of Salisbury in her own right, and daughter of William of Salisbury, 2nd Earl of Salisbury .

During the reign of King John, Salisbury was at court on several important ceremonial occasions, and held various offices: sheriff of Wiltshire , lieutenant of Gascony , constable of Dover and warden of the Cinque Ports , and later warden of the Welsh Marches . He was a commander in the king's Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210-1212. The king also granted him the honour of Eye .

In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders , where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme . This ended the invasion threat but not the conflicts between England and France . In 1214, Salisbury was sent to help Otto IV of Germany , an English ally, who was invading France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of the army at their disastrous defeat at the Battle of Bouvines , where he was captured.

By the time he returned to England, revolt was brewing amongst the barons. Salisbury was one of the few who remained loyal to John. In the civil war that took place the year after the signing of the Magna Carta , Salisbury was one of the leaders of the king's army in the south. However, after the French prince Louis (later Louis VIII ) landed as an ally of the rebels, Salisbury went over to his side. Presumably, he thought John's cause was lost.

After John's death and the departure of Louis, Salisbury, along with many other barons, joined the cause of John's young son, now Henry III of England . He held an influential place in the government during the king's minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining part of the English continental possessions. Salisbury's ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England in 1225, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of Ré . He died not long after his return to England at Salisbury Castle . Roger of Wendover alleged that he was poisoned by Hubert de Burgh . He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

William Longespee's tomb was opened in 1791. Bizarrely, the well-preserved corpse of a rat which carried traces of arsenic [5], was found inside his skull. The rat is now on display in a case at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.

Family
By his wife Ela, Countess of Salisbury , he had four sons and four daughters [6]:
William II Longespée (1212?-1250), who was sometimes called Earl of Salisbury but never legally bore the title because he died before his mother, Countess Ela, who held the earldom until her death in 1161;
Richard, a canon of Salisbury ;
Stephen (d. 1260), who was seneschal of Gascony;
Nicholas (d. 1297), bishop of Salisbury
Isabella, who married William de Vesey
Ella, married William d'Odingsels
Ela Longespée , who first married Thomas de Beaumont, 6th Earl of Warwick , and then married Philip Basset
Ida, who first married Ralph de Somery, and then William de Beauchamp

William married Ela, Countess of Salisbury,293 daughter of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Eléonore de Vitré, in 1196. Ela was born in 1187 in Amesbury, Wiltshire, England, died on 24 Aug 1261 in Lacock Abbey, Lacock, Wiltshire, England at age 74, and was buried in Lacock Abbey, Lacock, Wiltshire, England.

Burial Notes: The incription on her tombstone, originally written in Latin, reads:
Below lie buried the bones of the venerable Ela, who gave this sacred house as a home for the nuns. She also had lived here as holy abbess and Countess of Salisbury, full of good works

Research Notes: Only daughter and heiress of William FitzPatrick, who had no son.

From Wikipedia - Ela, Countess of Salisbury :

Ela, 3rd Countess of Salisbury (1187- 24 August 1261), was a wealthy English heiress and the suo jure Countess of Salisbury, having succeeded to the title in 1196 upon the death of her father, William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury .[1] Her husband William Longespee , an illegitimate half-brother of kings Richard I of England and John of England assumed the title of 3rd Earl of Salisbury by right of his marriage to Ela, which took place in 1196 when she was nine years old.

Ela became a nun after William's death, then Abbess of Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire which she had founded in 1229. Mary, Queen of Scots , English kings Edward IV and Richard III , and three of the queens consort of King Henry VIII , Anne Boleyn , Jane Seymour , and Catherine Howard were among her many descendants.

Family
Ela was born in Amesbury , Wiltshire in 1187, the only child and heiress of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury, Sheriff of Wiltshire and Eléonore de Vitré (c.1164- 1232/1233).[2] Her paternal grandparents were Patrick of Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Ela Talvas. Her maternal grandparents were Robert III de Vitré and Emma de Dinan, daughter of Alan de Dinan and Eléonore de Penthievre. In 1196, she succeeded her father as 3rd Countess of Salisbury suo jure. There is a story that immediately following her father's death she was imprisoned in a castle in Normandy by one of her paternal uncles who wished to take her title and enormous wealth for himself.

According to the legend, Ela was eventually rescued by William Talbot, a knight who had gone to France where he sang ballads under windows in all the castles of Normandy until he received a response from Ela.[3]


In 1198, Ela's mother married her fourth husband, Gilbert de Malesmains.

Marriage and children
In 1196, the same year she became countess and inherited her father's numerous estates, Ela married William Longespee, an illegitimate son of King Henry II of England , by his mistress Ida de Tosny, who later married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk . Longespee became 3rd Earl of Salisbury by right of his wife. The Continuator of Florence recorded that their marriage had been arranged by King Richard I of England , who was William's legitimate half-brother.[1]


Together William and Ela had at least eight or possibly nine children:
William II Longespee , titular Earl of Salisbury (c.1209- 7 February 1250), married in 1216 Idoine de Camville, daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustache Basset, by whom he had four children. William was killed while on crusade at the Battle of Mansurah .

Richard Longespee, clerk and canon of Salisbury.
Stephen Longespee , Seneschal of Gascony and Justiciar of Ireland (1216- 1260), married as her second husband 1243/1244 Emmeline de Ridelsford, daughter of Walter de Ridelsford and Annora Vitré, by whom he had two daughters: Ela, wife of Sir Roger La Zouche, and Emmeline, the second wife of Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly .

Nicholas Longespee, Bishop of Salisbury (died 28 May 1297)
Isabella Longespee (died before 1244), married as his first wife shortly after 16 May 1226, William de Vescy, Lord of Alnwick, by whom she had issue.
Petronilla Longespee, died unmarried
Ela Longespee (died 9 Februry 1298), married firstly Thomas de Warwick, Earl of Warwick; married secondly Sir Philip Basset
Ida Longespee , married firstly Ralph de Somery, Baron of Dudley; she married secondly William de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford , by whom she had six children, including Maud de Beauchamp, wife of Roger de Mowbray.[4]
Ida de Longespee (she is alternatively listed as William and Ela's granddaughter: see notes below), married Sir Walter FitzRobert of Woodham Walter, Essex , by whom she had issue including Ela FitzWalter FitzRobert, wife of William de Odyngsells.

Later life
In 1225, Ela's husband William was shipwrecked off the coast of Brittany , upon returning from Gascony. He spent months recovering at a monastery on the Island of Ré in France. He died at Salisbury Castle on 7 March 1226 just several days after arriving in England. Ela held the post of Sheriff of Wiltshire for two years following her husband's death.

Three years later in 1229, Ela founded Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. In 1238, she entered the abbey as a nun ; she was made Abbess of Lacock in 1240, and held the post until 1257. The Book of Lacock recorded that Ela founded the monasteries at Lacock and Henton.[1] During her tenure as abbess, Ela obtained many rights for the abbey and village of Lacock.

Ela, Countess of Salisbury died on 24 August 1261 and was buried in Lacock Abbey. The incription on her tombstone, originally written in Latin, reads:
Below lie buried the bones of the venerable Ela, who gave this sacred house as a home for the nuns. She also had lived here as holy abbess and Countess of Salisbury, full of good works[5]


Her numerous descendants included English kings Edward IV and Richard III, Mary, Queen of Scots, Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex , Sir Winston Churchill , Diana, Princess of Wales , the Dukes of Norfolk , Mary Boleyn , and queens consort Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, and Catherine Howard.

References
^ a b c Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, England, Earls of Salisbury 1196-1310 (Longespee)
^ The Earls of Salisbury are sometimes mistakenly assigned the surname "d'Evreux", but it is spurious, arising from confusion over the nickname of a fictitious ancestor, Walter le Ewrus (Walter the Fortunate). The family of the Earls of Salisbury never used the name "d'Evreux", they do not descend from the Norman Counts of Evreux, nor do the later Devereux derive from them. See Cokayne, George (1982). The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant. XI. Gloucester England: A. Sutton. p. 373, note (b). ISBN 0904387828 .

^ Thomas B. Costain, The Conquering Family, pp.291-92, published by Doubleday and Company, Inc., New York, 1949.
^ This Ida is sometimes confused with another Ida Longespee, who married Sir Walter FitzRobert of Woodham Walter, Essex , by whom she had issue including Ela FitzWalter FitzRobert, wife of William de Odyngsells. This latter Ida Longespee has been given different parents by different genealogists; G. Andrews Moriarty suggested the two Idas were sisters; Gerald Paget suggests the Ida who married Walter FitzRobert may have been the daughter of William Longespee II, Earl of Salisbury, by his wife, Idoine de Camville.

^ History of Chitterne: Ela, Countess of Salibury

Noted events in her life were:

• Founded: Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, 1229.

• Sheriff of Wiltshire: 1226-1228. Following her husband's death 7 March 1226.

• Entered: Lacock Abbey as a nun, 1238.

• Abbess: of Lacock Abbey, 1240-1257.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 254 M    i. William II Longspée 294 was born about 1212 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, died on 8 Feb 1250 in Al-Mansura, Egypt about age 38, and was buried in Acre, Palestine.

189. Geoffrey I de Porhoët 217 (Constance, Princess of Bretagne139, Maud, Princess of England99, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1126 in <Rohan, Brittany, France>. Other names for Geoffrey were Geoffrey La Zouche and Geoffrey la Zouche.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Baron Zouche :

Baron Zouche is a title that has thrice been created in the Peerage of England . The de la Zouche family descended from Alan la Zouche, 1st Baron la Zouche of Ashby , sometimes called Alan de Porhoët and Alan la Coche (c. 1136-1190), a Breton who settled in England during the reign of Henry II . He was the son of Vicomte Geoffrey I de Porhoët and Hawisa of Brittany.

Geoffrey married Hawise Fergan,106 daughter of Alan Fergant and Unknown, about 1156. Hawise was born about 1130 in <Bretagne, France>. Other names for Hawise were Hawisa of Brittany and Hawise Fergant.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 255 M    i. Alan La Zouche 295 was born about 1157 in <Harringworth, Northamptonshire>, England and died in 1190 in North Melton, Devonshire, England about age 33.

190. Simon III de Montfort, Count of Evreux 219 (Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester140, Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died about 1181.

Simon married Maud.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 256 F    i. Bertrade de Montfort, of Evreux .296

191. Joanna de Meschines 220 (Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester140, Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1145 in <Chester, Cheshire>, England.

Joanna married Adam Brus,220 son of Adam Brus and Jueta de Arches,. Adam was born about 1143 in Skelton, North Yorkshire, England, died in 1196 in Skelton, North Yorkshire, England about age 53, and was buried in Gisborough Priory, Guisborough, North Yorkshire, England. Another name for Adam was Adam Bruce.

Research Notes: According to Wikipedia, Skelton Castle was built around 1200 by the Brus family.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 257 F    i. Isabel Brus 220 was born about 1160 in Skelton, North Yorkshire, England, died after 1230, and was buried in Whitby Abbey, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

192. Hugh, of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester 221 (Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester140, Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1147 in Kevelioc, Monmouthshire, Wales and died on 30 Jun 1181 in Leek, Staffordshire, England at age 34. Another name for Hugh was Hugh de Meschines 5th Earl of Chester.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester :

Hugh de Kevelioc, Earl of Chester (1147 - 30 June 1181) was the son of Ranulf de Gernon and Maud of Gloucester, daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (otherwise known as Robert de Caen , the illegitimate son of Henry I of England , making her Henry's granddaughter).

He is thought by some to have taken his name from Kevelioc in Monmouth as his birthplace, but others think that instead he was born in, and took the name of, the cwmwd of Cyfeiliog (in modern Powys ) in the southern part of the Kingdom of Powys , Wales .

He was underage when his father's death in 1153 made him heir to his family's estates on both sides of the channel. He joined the baronial Revolt of 1173-1174 against King Henry II of England , and was influential in convincing the Bretons to revolt. After being captured and imprisoned after the Battle of Alnwick , he finally got his estates restored in 1177, and served in King Henry's Irish campaigns.

In 1169 he married Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux , daughter of Simon III de Montfort . She was the cousin of King Henry, who gave her away in marriage. Their children were:
Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester
Maud of Chester (1171-1233), married David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon
Mabel of Chester, married William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel
Agnes of Chester (died 2 November 1247), married William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby
Hawise of Chester (1180-1242), married Robert II de Quincy
A daughter, name unknown, who was briefly married to Llywelyn Fawr

He also had an illegitimate daughter, Amice of Chester, who married Ralph de Mainwaring.

Hugh of Kevelioc died 30 June 1181 at Leek , Staffordshire , England.

Noted events in his life were:

• Vicomte d'Avranches, Normandy:

Hugh married Bertrade de Montfort, of Evreux,296 daughter of Simon III de Montfort, Count of Evreux and Maud, in 1169. Other names for Bertrade were Bertred of Evreux and Bertrade d'Evreux de Montfort.

Marriage Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 126-28

Research Notes: Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)


Children from this marriage were:

+ 258 M    i. Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester was born in 1172, died on 26 Oct 1232 at age 60, and was buried in St. Werburg's, Chester, Cheshire, England.

+ 259 F    ii. Mabel, of Chester 297 was born about 1173.

+ 260 F    iii. Hawise, of Chester, Countess of Lincoln 298 was born in 1180 and died between 1241 and 1243.

+ 261 F    iv. Agnes, of Chester, Lady of Chartley 299 died on 2 Nov 1247.

Hugh next married someone.

His child was:

+ 262 F    i. Amice, of Chester 300 was born about 1167.

193. Roland, Lord of Galloway 223 (Uchtred, Lord of Galloway142, Elizabeth, Princess of England101, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1164 in <Galloway, Perthshire, Scotland>, died on 19 Dec 1200 in Northamptonshire, England about age 36, and was buried in Abbey of Saint Andrew, Northamptonshire, England. Another name for Roland was Roland of Galloway.

Noted events in his life were:

• Constable of Scotland: 1189-1200.

Roland married Elena de Morville,202 daughter of Richard de Morville, of Lauder in Lauderdale and Avice de Lancaster,. Elena was born about 1172 in <Kirkoswald, Cumberland, England>, died on 11 Jun 1217 about age 45, and was buried in Abbey of Dundrennan, Kirkcudbright, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland. Another name for Elena was Helena de Morville.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 178)

194. Philip II, of Swabia, King of Germany 224 (Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor143, Judith, of Bavaria102, Henry I, Duke of Bavaria57, Judith, of Normandy31, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1177 and died on 21 Jun 1208 in Bamburg, Germany at age 31. Another name for Philip was Philip of Swabia, King of Germany.

Birth Notes: Wikipedia has b. 1177. Ancestral Roots has b. 1177/81.

Death Notes: Murdered at Bamberg by Otto V of Wittelsbach.

Research Notes: Second husband of Irene Angelina.

From Wikipedia - Philip of Swabia :

Philip of Swabia (1177 - June 21 , 1208 ) was king of Germany and duke of Swabia , the rival of the emperor Otto IV .

Biography
Philip was the fifth and youngest son of the emperor Frederick I and Beatrix , daughter of Renaud III , count of Burgundy , and brother of the emperor Henry VI . He entered the clergy, was made provost of Aix-la-Chapelle , and in 1190 or 1191 was chosen bishop of Würzburg . Having accompanied his brother Henry to Italy in 1191, Philip forsook his ecclesiastical calling, and, travelling again to Italy, was made duke of Tuscany in 1195 and received an extensive grant of lands. In his retinue in Italy was the Minnesinger Bernger von Horheim .
In 1196 Philip became duke of Swabia, on the death of his brother Conrad ; and in May 1197 he married Irene Angelina , daughter of the Byzantine emperor , Isaac II , and widow of Roger III, Titular King of Sicily , a lady who is described by Walther von der Vogelweide as " the rose without a thorn, the dove without guile."
Philip enjoyed his brother's confidence to a very great extent, and appears to have been designated as guardian of the Henry's young son Frederick , afterwards the emperor Frederick II, in case of his father's early death. In 1197 he had set out to fetch Frederick from Sicily for his coronation as King of the Germans when he heard of the emperor's death and returned at once to Germany. He appears to have desired to protect the interests of his nephew and to quell the disorder which arose on Henry's death, but was overtaken by events. The hostility to the kingship of a child was growing, and after Philip had been chosen as defender of the empire during Frederick's minority he consented to his own election. He was elected German king at Mühlhausen on March 8 , 1198 , and was crowned at Mainz on the September 8 following.
Meanwhile, a number of princes hostile to Philip, under the leadership of Adolph , Archbishop of Cologne , had elected an anti-king in the person of Otto, second son of Henry the Lion , duke of Saxony . In the war that followed, Philip, who drew his principal support from south Germany, met with considerable success. In 1199 he received further accessions to his party and carried the war into his opponent's territory, although unable to obtain the support of Pope Innocent III , and only feebly assisted by his ally Philip Augustus , king of France . The following year was less favourable to his arms; and in March 1201 Innocent took the decisive step of placing Philip and his associates under the ban, and began to work energetically in favour of Otto.
Also in 1201, Philip was visited by his cousin Boniface of Montferrat , the leader of the Fourth Crusade . The Crusaders were by this time under Venetian control and were besieging Zara on the Adriatic Sea . Although Boniface's exact reasons for meeting with Philip are unknown, while at Philip's court he also met Alexius Angelus , Philip's brother-in-law. Alexius convinced Boniface, and later the Venetians, to divert the Crusade to Constantinople and restore Isaac II to the throne, as he had recently been deposed by Alexius III , Alexius and Irene's uncle.
The two succeeding years were still more unfavourable to Philip. Otto, aided by Ottokar I , king of Bohemia , and Hermann I , landgrave of Thuringia , drove him from north Germany, thus compelling him to seek by abject concessions, but without success, reconciliation with Innocent. The submission to Philip of Hermann of Thuringia in 1204 marks the turning-point of his fortunes, and he was soon joined by Adolph of Cologne and Henry I, Duke of Brabant .
On January 6 , 1205 he was crowned again with great ceremony by Adolph at Aix-la-Chapelle, though it was not until 1207 that his entry into Cologne practically brought the war to a close. A month or two later Philip was loosed from the papal ban, and in March 1208 it seems probable that a treaty was concluded by which a nephew of the pope was to marry one of Philip's daughters and to receive the disputed dukedom of Tuscany. Philip was preparing to crush the last flicker of the rebellion in Brunswick-Lüneburg when he was murdered at Bamberg , on June 21 , 1208 , by Otto of Wittelsbach , count palatine in Bavaria . Otto, already known for his unstable character, fell into a rage when he learned of the dissolution of his betrothal to Gertrude of Silesia by her father, Duke Henry I the Bearded of Lower Silesia . Henry was apparently informed of the Wittelsbach's cruel tendencies and in an act of concern for his young daughter decided to terminate the marriage agreement. Otto proceeded to blame Philip, without grounds, for another spurned marriage alliance (the first being to Philip's own daughter, Beatrice) and swore revenge on the German King, culminating in the murder at Bamberg.[1]
Philip was a brave and handsome man, and contemporary writers, among whom was Walther von der Vogelweide , praise his mildness and generosity.

Philip's descendants

Philip of Swabia married Irene Angelina , daughter of Isaac II Angelus on May 25 , 1197 . Their four daughters were:
Beatrice of Hohenstaufen (1198-1212), married Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor
Cunigunde of Hohenstaufen (1200-1248), married King Wenceslaus I, King of Bohemia
Marie of Hohenstaufen (1201-1235), married Henry II, Duke of Brabant
Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen (1203-1235), married King Ferdinand III of Castile

Noted events in his life were:

• King of Germany:

• Duke of Swabia:

Philip married Irene Angelina,301 daughter of Isaac II Angelus, Eastern Roman Emperor and Herina, on 25 May 1197. Irene was born in 1181 and died in 1208 at age 27. Another name for Irene was Maria.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Irene Angelina :

Irene Angelina (1181 - 1208) was the daughter of the Byzantine Emperor Isaac II Angelos by his first wife Herina Tornikaina[1]. Her paternal grandparents were Andronikos Dukas Angelos and Euphrosyne Kastamonitissa.


Biography
In 1193 she married Roger III of Sicily , but he died on 24 December 1193 . Irene was captured in the German invasion of Sicily on 29 December 1194 and was married on 25 May 1197 to Philip of Swabia . In Germany, she was renamed Maria.

Her father, who had been deposed in 1195, urged her to get Philip's support for his reinstatement; her brother, Alexius , subsequently spent some time at Philip's court during the preparations for the Fourth Crusade . She thus had an early influence on the eventual diversion of the Crusade to Constantinople in 1204.

She was described by Walther von der Vogelweide as "the rose without a thorn, the dove without guile"[citation needed ].

Philip and Irene had four daughters:
Beatrice of Hohenstaufen (1198-1212), married Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor , died without issue.
Cunigunde of Hohenstaufen (1200-1248), married King Wenceslaus I, King of Bohemia , by whom she had issue.

Marie of Hohenstaufen (3 April 1201- 29 March 1235), married Henry II, Duke of Brabant , by whom she had issue.

Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen (1203-1235), married King Ferdinand III of Castile , by whom she had issue.
and two sons (called Reinald and Frederick) who died in infancy.
After the murder of her husband (21 April 1208 ), Irene - who was pregnant by that time - retired to the Burg Hohenstaufen . There, four months later (27 August 1208 ), she gave birth to a daughter (called Beatrice Postuma); but both mother and child died shortly afterwards. She was buried in the family mausoleum in the Staufen proprietary monastery of Lorch Abbey , along with her daughter and sons. Her grave, now destroyed, cannot be reconstructed today.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 263 F    i. Beatriz, of Swabia 302 was born in 1198 and died in 1212 at age 14.

+ 264 F    ii. Cunigunde, of Hohenstaufen 302 was born in 1200 and died in 1248 at age 48.

+ 265 F    iii. Marie, of Hohenstaufen 303 was born on 3 Apr 1201 in Arezzo, Tuscany, Italy and died on 29 Mar 1235 in Leuven, Brabant, Flanders, Belgium at age 33.

+ 266 F    iv. Elisabeth, of Hohenstaufen 304 was born in 1203 and died on 5 Nov 1235 in Toro, Spain at age 32.

Philip next married someone.

195. Jean I, Count of Ponthieu 225 (Guy II, of Ponthieu144, Hélie, of Burgundy103, Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy59, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1140 and died in 1191 about age 51. Another name for Jean was John I of Ponthieu.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - John I, Count of Ponthieu :

John I of Ponthieu (c. 1140-1191) was the son of Guy II of Ponthieu and succeeded him as Count of Ponthieu in 1147. He married Beatrice of Saint-Pol , and was succeeded by his son William IV Talvas .

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Ponthieu: 1147-1191.

Jean married someone.

His child was:

+ 267 M    i. William IV, of Ponthieu 305 was born in 1179 and died on 4 Oct 1221 at age 42.

196. William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury 227 (Ela Talvas, of Alençon and Ponthieu145, Hélie, of Burgundy103, Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy59, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1150 in <Salisbury, Wiltshire>, England and died on 17 Apr 1196 in <Salisbury, Wiltshire>, England about age 46.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - William of Salisbury, 2nd Earl of Salisbury :

William de Salisbury, 2nd Earl of Salisbury. Though he is generally known as such, his proper title was Earl of Wiltshire , which title was conferred on his father by Empress Maud around 1143. He was also called William FitzPatrick.

He was the son and heir of Patrick of Salisbury , 1st Earl of Wiltshire, (but styled Earl of Salisbury) and Sybil, daughter of Patrick de Chaources (or Chaworth). [1].

Family
He married Eléonore, daughter of Robert III de Vitre of Tilliers. He died without male issue in 1196. Their only daughter and heiress, was Ela, Countess of Salisbury who married William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury , who was half-brother to the king.

Service to Richard I
William bore the golden sceptre at the coronation of King Richard I , but the next year when the king became a prisoner in Almaine, he was one of those who adhered to Prince John, Earl of Moreton, and later King John of England . In 1195, William was back with King Richard in the expedition into Normandy and upon his return to England was one of Richard's great council assembled at Nottingham. The Earl of Salisbury was one of the four earls who supported the canopy of state at the second coronation of Richard that same year

Disputed D'Evereux connections
In Sir Bernard Burke's Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, the family is written up under D'Evereux. However much this link to Edward d'Evereux is disputed, there is some valuable information on the Earls thereafter.

Noted events in his life were:

• 2nd Earl of Wiltshire:

William married Eléonore de Vitré,306 daughter of Robert III de Vitré, of Tilliers and Emma Dinan, about 1184. Eléonore was born about 1164 in France and died in 1233 about age 69. Other names for Eléonore were Alianore de Vitré and Eleanore de Vitré.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 268 F    i. Ela, Countess of Salisbury 293 was born in 1187 in Amesbury, Wiltshire, England, died on 24 Aug 1261 in Lacock Abbey, Lacock, Wiltshire, England at age 74, and was buried in Lacock Abbey, Lacock, Wiltshire, England.

197. Sir Galfridus le Despencer 229 (Thurston le Despencer146, Hélie, of Burgundy103, Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy59, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1155 in Stanley, Lincolnshire, England and died in 1251 in Defford, Worcestershire, England at age 96. Another name for Galfridus was Geoffrey le Despencer.

Galfridus married Ann in 1177 in Lincolnshire, England. Ann was born in 1157 in Stanley, Lincolnshire, England.

198. Thomas Despencer, of Elington, Lincolnshire 230 (Thurston le Despencer146, Hélie, of Burgundy103, Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy59, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1169.

Thomas married Rohese de Foix.307 Rohese was born in 1165 in Foix, Ariege, France.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 269 M    i. Hugh Le Despencer, of Ryhall, Rutlandshire 230 was born about 1197 and died on 23 Feb 1238 about age 41.

+ 270 M    ii. Lord Galfridus le Despencer, of Marcheley 308 was born in 1180 in Defford, Worcestershire, England and died in 1242 in Worcestershire, England at age 62.

199. Geoffroi IV de Joinville, Sénéchal of Champagne 232 (Geoffroi III de Joinville, Sénéchal of Champagne and of Bar-sur-Seine147, Adélarde de Vignory105, Beatrice, of Burgundy61, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in Aug 1190 in Acre, Palestine.

Death Notes: Died in battle

Geoffroi married Helvis de Dampierre,288 daughter of Guy I, Vicomte de Troyes and Helvide de Baudement,. Helvis died after 1295. Another name for Helvis was Helvide de Dampierre.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 271 M    i. Simon de Joinville, Sénéchal of Champagne, Seigneur de Vaucouleurs 309 died in May 1233 in Palestine.

200. Alfonso IX, King of Léon 233 (Urraca, of Portugal148, Afonso I, King of Portugal106, Henry, of Burgundy, Count of Portugal63, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 15 Aug 1171 in Zamora, Léon, Spain and died on 24 Sep 1230 in Villanueva de Sarria, Lugo, Spain at age 59. Another name for Alfonso was Alfonso IX Fernandez King of Leon.

Birth Notes: Ancestral Roots has b. 1171 and b. 1166.

Research Notes: Second husband of Berenguela of Castile.

From Wikipedia - Alfonso IX of León :

Alfonso IX (15 August 1171 - 23 September or 24, 1230), was king of León and Galicia , from the death of his father Ferdinand II in 1188 until his own death. According to Ibn Khaldun , he is said to have been called the Baboso or Slobberer because he was subject to fits of rage during which he foamed at the mouth.

Alfonso was the only son of King Ferdinand II of León and Urraca of Portugal . He took a part in the work of the reconquest , conquering the whole of Extremadura (including the cities of Cáceres and Badajoz ). He was also the most modern king of his time, founding the University of Salamanca in 1212 and summoning in 1188 the first parliament with representation of the citizenry ever seen in Western Europe, the Cortes of León .

In spite of all the above - some of whose significance became evident only later - this king is often remembered mainly for the difficulties into which his successive marriages led him with the Pope . He was first married in 1191 to his cousin Teresa of Portugal , who bore him two daughters, and a son who died young.

The marriage was declared null by the Pope; however, Alfonso paid no attention until he was presumably tired of his wife. His next step was to marry his second cousin, Berenguela of Castile , in 1197. For this act of contumacy, the king and the kingdom were placed under interdict .

The Pope was, however, compelled to modify his measures by the threat that, if the people could not obtain the services of religion, they would not support the clergy, and that heresy would spread. The king was left under interdict personally, but to that he showed himself indifferent, and he had the support of his clergy. Berenguela left him after the birth of five children, and the king then returned to Teresa, to whose daughters he left his kingdom in his will.

Children
Alfonso's children by Teresa of Portugal
were:
1) Fernando (ca. 1192-August 1214, aged around 22), unmarried and without issue
2) Blessed Sancha (ca. 1193-1270)
3) Dulce, also called Aldonza (1194/ca. 1195-ca./aft. 1243), unmarried and without issue

His eldest daughter, Sancha, was engaged to her cousin King Henry I of Castile , but Henry died in 1217 before the marriage could be solemnized. Once the would be inheritor from his first marriage, named Fernando (de Leon y Portugal)who died in 1214, he apparently wanted to disinherit the eldest son from his second marriage, but born around the year 1200, also named Fernando (de Leon y Castilla) , King Alfonso IX invited the quite mature former King Consort of Jerusalem John of Brienne to marry his daughter Sancha and thus inherit the Leonese throne through her.

However, his former second wife, ruling Queen Berenguela of Castile convinced John of Brienne to marry one of her daughters, some 10 years younger than Sancha, instead, named Berenguela of Leon , on account of her father the King of Leon and of her mother divorced Queen Bereguela of Castile .

Though unmarried and pious spinster Sancha was the nominal heiress of Leon-Galicia on her father's death in 1230, Sancha was easily set aside by negotiations, including a good single woman dowry between the former first wife and the former second wife, both divorced from the leonese. Sancha became a nun at Cozollos , where she died in 1270; she was later beatified. Her sister Dulce-Aldonza spent her life with her Consort Queen of Leon mother in Portugal.

Alfonso's children by Berenguela of Castile were:
4)Leonor (1198/1199-31 October 1210)
5)King Fernando III the Saint (1200-1252), named also Fernando III de Castilla y Leon after 1230 when his father Alfonso IX de Leon died.
6)Alfonso, 4th Lord of Molina (1203-1272)
7)Berenguela of Leon (1204-1237), married John of Brienne
8)Constanza (1 May 1200 or 1205-7 September 1242), became a nun at Las Huelgas , Burgos , where she died

Alfonso, father of 3 from his first void marriage and father of another 5 from his second void marriage, also fathered many illegitimate children, some 23 known (3 + 5 + perhaps 15 out of married life, all documented) :

Alfonso's children by Aldonza Martínez da Silva (daughter of Martim Gomes da Silva & Urraca Rodrigues and subsequently wife with issue of Diego Froilaz, Conde de Cifuentes, had issue):
9)Pedro Alfonso of León, 1st Lord of Tenorio (ca. 1196/ca. 1200-1226), Grand Master of Santiago, married N de Villarmayor, and had issue
10)Alfonso Alfonso of León, died yong
11)Fernando Alfonso of León, died young
12)Rodrigo Alfonso of León (ca. 1210-ca. 1267), 1st Lord of Aliger and Governor of Zamora , married ca. 1240 to Inés Rodriguez de Cabrera (ca. 1200-), and had issue
13)Teresa Alfonso of León (ca. 1210-), wife of Nuno Gonzalez de Lara, el Bueno, señor de Lara
14)Aldonza Alonso of León (ca. 1212/ca. 1215-1266), wife, first, of Diego Ramírez Froilaz, nephew of her stepfather, without issue, and, second, of Pedro Ponce de Cabrera , (ca. 1210-), and had issue, ancestors of the notorious Ponce de León family.

Alfonso's child by Inés Iñíguez de Mendoza (ca. 1180-) (daughter of Lope Iñiguez de Mendoza, 1st Lord of Mendoza (ca. 1140-1189) and wife Teresa Ximénez de los Cameros (ca. 1150-)):
15)Urraca Alfonso of León (ca. 1190/ca. 1197-), first wife ca. 1230 of Lopo II Díaz de Haro (1192-15 December 1236), 6th Sovereign Lord of Viscaya, and had issue

Alfonso's child by Estefánia Pérez de Limia
, daughter of Pedro Arias de Limia and wife, subsequently wife of Rodrigo Suárez, Merino mayor of Galicia , had issue):
16)Fernando Alfonso of León (ca. 1211-), died young

Alfonso's children by Maua, of unknown origin
:
17)Fernando Alfonso of León (ca. 1215/1218/1220-Salamanca , 1278/1279), Archdean of Santiago, married to Aldara de Ulloa and had issue

Alfonso's children by Dona Teresa Gil de Soverosa
(ca. 1170-) (daughter of Dom Gil Vasques de Soverosa & first wife Maria Aires de Fornelos):
18)María Alfonso of León (ca. 1190/1200/1222-aft. 1252), married as his second wife Soeiro Aires de Valadares (ca. 1140-) and had issue and Álvaro Fernández de Lara (ca. 1200-) and had female issue, later mistress of her nephew Alfonso X of Castile
19)Sancha Alfonso of León (1210/ca. 1210-1270), a Nun after divorcing without issue Simón Ruíz, Lord of Los Cameros
20)Martín Alfonso of León (ca. 1210/ca. 1225-1274/ca. 1275)
22)Urraca Alfonso of León (ca. 1210/1228-aft.1252, married twice, first to García Romeu of Tormos, without issue, then Pedro Guillén de Guzmán y González Girón

Alfonso's other illegitimate child, mother unknown
:
23)Mayor Alfonso de León, married Rodrigo Gómez de Trava, without issue

Alfonso VIII of León was the first King in Western Europe who summoned the citizens to the Parliament (León's Cortes of 1188). He also founded the University of Salamanca in 1208.

Noted events in his life were:

• King of Léon: 1188-1230.

• King of Galicia: 1188-1230.

Alfonso married Berengaria, of Castile 310 in 1197. Marriage status: annulment in 1204. Berengaria was born in 1180 in <Burgos, Castile>, Spain and died on 8 Nov 1246 in Burgos, Castile, Spain at age 66. Other names for Berengaria were Berenguela of Castile and Berenguela Queen of Castile.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots has d. 1246 and d. 1244.

Research Notes: Widow of Konrad II of Swabia.

From Wikipedia - Berengaria of Castile :

Berengaria (Castilian : Berengaria; 1180 - 8 November 1246), was briefly queen of Castile and León . The eldest daughter of Alfonso VIII of Castile and Eleanor of England , she was briefly engaged to Conrad II, Duke of Swabia , but he was murdered in 1196 before they could be married.

Marriage
Berengaria married King Alfonso IX of León in 1198, but this was annulled in 1204 by Pope Innocent III because they were second cousins. Berengaria and Alfonso had five children, including one who died in infancy, and when she returned to her father's court in Castile, she brought her children with her to Otella.

Berengaria often found herself politically at odds with her former husband. Alfonso had two daughters, Sancha and Dulce, by his first wife, Theresa of Portugal, and wished to disinherit Berengaria's children in favor of these daughters. To this end, he invited John of Brienne to marry his eldest daughter, Sancha, and thus inherit his kingdom. Berengaria sabotaged this plan by convincing John of Brienne to marry her own daughter, Berengaria of Leon , instead. Later, on 24 September 1230 when Alfonso died, Berengaria and Ferdinand acted to set aside the rights of Sancha and Dulce by offering them a lifetime appanage, which they accepted. This was done so that, with Berengaria's aid, he could assume the Leonese throne.

Queen
When her brother Henry died by accident in 1217, Berengaria became sovereign of Castile. She soon renounced her crown in favor of her son Ferdinand . Thereafter she served as the king's motherly advisor; according to the Cronica Latina , her "total intent and desire being to procure honor for her son in every way possible". Berengaria helped quell the rebellious nobles, and then arranged for Ferdinand to marry a high-born wife, Beatrice of Swabia.

Berengaria maintained strong connections with her sister Blanche , who was Queen of France. It was Blanche who suggested sending Jeanne of Ponthieu as a bride for Ferdinand after his first wife's death.

Children
Her children with Alfonso IX included:
Eleanor (1198/1199-31 October 1210)
King Ferdinand III of Castile (1200-1252)
Alfonso, 4th Lord of Molina (1203-1272)
Berengaria of Leon (1204-1237), married John of Brienne
Constance (1 May 1200 or 1205-7 September 1242), became a nun at Las Huelgas , Burgos , where she died

Noted events in her life were:

• Queen of Castile: 1217. Immediately surrendered the throne to her son Ferdinand.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 272 F    i. Berenguela, Princess of Leon and Castile 47 was born about 1199 in <Leon, Leon>, Spain and died on 12 Apr 1237 about age 38.

+ 273 M    ii. Fernando III of Castile, King of Castile and Leon 311 was born on 5 Aug 1199 in Monastery of Valparaíso (Peleas de Arriba, Zamora), (Spain) and died on 30 May 1252 in Seville, Spain at age 52.

+ 274 M    iii. Alfonso, de Molina 312 was born in 1203 and died in 1272 at age 69.


201. Afonso II, King of Portugal (Sancho I, King of Portugal149, Afonso I, King of Portugal106, Henry, of Burgundy, Count of Portugal63, Henry, of Burgundy32, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 23 Apr 1185 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, died on 25 Mar 1223 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal at age 37, and was buried in Santa Cruz Monastery, Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Afonso II of Portugal :

Afonso II (Portuguese pronounced [?'fõsu] ; English Alphonzo), or Affonso (Archaic Portuguese), Alfonso or Alphonso (Portuguese-Galician ) or Alphonsus (Latin version), nicknamed "the Fat" (Portuguese o Gordo), third king of Portugal , was born in Coimbra on April 23 , 1185 and died on March 25 , 1223 in the same city. He was the second but eldest surviving son of Sancho I of Portugal by his wife, Dulce Berenguer of Barcelona , Infanta of Aragon . Afonso succeeded his father in 1212.


Marriage and descendants
Afonso married Infanta Urraca of Castile , daughter of Alfonso VIII , King of Castile , and Leonora of Aquitaine , in 1208.

Afonso married Urracca, of Castile in 1208. Urracca was born in 1186 and died in 1220 at age 34.

Research Notes: Wikipedia - Afonso II of Portugal


Children from this marriage were:

+ 275 M    i. Sancho II, King of Portugal was born on 8 Sep 1207 and died on 4 Jan 1248 at age 40.

+ 276 M    ii. Afonso III, King of Portugal and the Algarve was born on 5 May 1210 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal and died on 16 Feb 1279 in Alcobaça, Portugal at age 68.

202. Alfonso VIII "the Noble", King of Castile 235 (Sancho III, of Castile150, Alfonso VII, King of Castile and Léon108, Urraca, of Castile, Queen of Castile and Léon65, Constance, of Burgundy33, Robert "the Old", Duke of Burgundy16, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 11 Nov 1155 and died on 5 Oct 1214 at age 58. Other names for Alfonso were Alfonso VIII "the Good" King of Castile and El de las Navas.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Alfonso VIII of Castile :
Alfonso VIII (11 November 1155 - 5 October 1214 ), called the Noble or el de las Navas, was the King of Castile from 1158 to his death and King of Toledo [1]. He is most remembered for his part in the Reconquista and the downfall of the Almohad Caliphate . After having suffered a great defeat with his own army at Alarcos against the Almohads, he led the coalition of Christian princes and foreign crusaders who broke the power of the Almohads in the Battle of the Navas de Tolosa in 1212, an event which marked the arrival of an irreversible tide of Christian supremacy on the Iberian peninsula .
His reign saw the domination of Castile over León and, by his alliance with Aragon, he drew those two spheres of Christian Iberia into close connection.


Regency and civil war
Alfonso was born to Sancho III of Castile and Blanca , daughter of García Ramírez of Navarre , in Soria on 11 November 1155. He was named after his grandfather Alfonso VII . His early life resembled that of other medieval kings. His father died in 1158 when his mother was also dead. Though proclaimed king when only three years of age, he was regarded as a mere name by the unruly nobles to whom a minority was convenient. Immediately, Castile was plunged into conflicts between the various noble houses vying for ascendancy in the inevitable regency. The devotion of a squire of his household, who carried him on the pommel of his saddle to the stronghold of San Esteban de Gormaz , saved him from falling into the hands of the contending factions. The noble houses of Lara and Castro both claimed the regency, as did the boy's uncle, Ferdinand II of León . In March 1160 the former two families met at the Battle of Lobregal and the Castro were victorious.
Alfonso was put in the custody of the loyal village Ávila . At barely fifteen, he came forth to do a man's work by restoring his kingdom to order. It was only by a surprise that he recovered his capital Toledo from the hands of the Laras.

[edit ] Reconquista
In 1174, he ceded Uclés to the Order of Santiago and afterwards this became the order's principal seat. From Uclés, he began a campaign which culminated in the reconquest of Cuenca in 1177. The city surrendered on 21 September , the feast of Saint Matthew , ever afterwards celebrated by the citizens of the town.
Alfonso took the initiative to ally all the major Christian kingdoms of the peninsula - Navarre , León , Portugal , and Aragon - against the Almohads . By the Treaty of Cazola of 1179, the zones of expansion of each kingdom were defined.
After founding Plasencia (Cáceres ) in 1186, he embarked on a major initiative to unite the Castilian nobility around the Reconquista. In that year, he recuperated part of La Rioja from the Kingdom of Navarre .
In 1195, after the treaty with the Almohads was broken, he came to the defence of Alarcos on the river Guadiana , then the principal Castilian town in the region. At the subsequent Battle of Alarcos , he was roundly defeated by the caliph Abu Yaqub Yusuf al-Mansur . The reoccupation of the surrounding territory by the Almohads was quickly commenced with Calatrava falling first. For the next seventeen years, the frontier between Moor and Castilian was fixed in the hill country just outside Toledo.
Finally, in 1212, through the mediation of Pope Innocent III , a crusade was called against the Almohads. Castilians under Alfonso, Aragonese and Catalans under Peter II , Navarrese under Sancho VII , and Franks under the archbishop Arnold of Narbonne all flocked to the effort. The military orders also lent their support. Calatrava first, then Alarcos, and finally Benavente were captured before a final battle was fought at Las Navas de Tolosa near Santa Elena on 16 July . The caliph Muhammad an-Nasir was routed and Almohad power broken.

[edit ] Cultural legacy

Tombs of Alfonso and Eleanor
Alfonso was the founder of the first Spanish university, a studium generale at Palencia , which, however, did not survive him. His court also served as an important instrument for Spanish cultural achievement. His marriage (Burgos , September 1180) with Eleanor (Leonora), daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine , brought him under the influence of the greatest governing intellect of his time. Troubadours and sages were always present, largely due to the influence of Eleanor.
Alfonso died at Gutierre-Muñoz and was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, Henry I , named after his maternal grandfather.


[edit ] Children
With Eleanor, (Leonora of England ) he had 11 children:
Berenguela , or Berengaria, (August 1180 - 8 November 1246 ), married Alfonso IX of Leon
Sancho (1181)
Sancha (1182 - 3 February 1184 )
Henry (1184)
Urraca (1186 - 1220), married Alfonso II of Portugal
Blanch (4 March 1188 - 26 November 1252 ), married Louis VIII of France
Ferdinand (29 September 1189 - 1211), on whose behalf Diego of Acebo and the future Saint Dominic travelled to Denmark in 1203 to secure a bride[2]
Mafalda (1191 - 1204)
Constance (1195 - 1243), abbess of Santa María la Real of Las Huelgas
Eleanor (1200 - 1244), married James I of Aragon
Henry I (14 April 1204 - 1217), successor

Noted events in his life were:

• King of Castile: 1158-1214.

Alfonso married Eleanor, of England,213 daughter of Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England and Eleanor, of Aquitaine, in Sep 1180. Eleanor was born on 13 Oct 1162 in Domfront, Normandy and died on 31 Oct 1214 at age 52. Another name for Eleanor was Leonora of England and Aquitaine.

Marriage Notes: Ancestral Roots has m. 1177.

Birth Notes: Ancestral Roots has b. 1162 and b. 1161

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Eleanor of England (1162-1214) :

Eleanor of England (known in Castilian as Leonora; 13 October 1162 - 31 October 1214) was Queen of Castile and Toledo as wife of Alfonso VIII of Castile .

She was born in the castle at Domfront , Normandy , and was baptised by Henry of Marcy . She was the sixth child and second daughter of King Henry II of England and his wife Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine . Her godfather was the chronicler Robert of Torigny , who had a special interest in her and recorded her life as best he could. She received her first name as a namesake of her mother, whose name "Eleanor" (or Alienor) had previously been unrecorded though may have been related to the Greek Helen or the Italian Elena . Another view holds that in the Occitan language , Eleanor simply meant "the other Aenor," since Eleanor of Aquitaine was named for her mother, called Aenor .

Eleanor was a younger maternal half-sister of Marie de Champagne and Alix of France . She was a younger sister of William IX, Count of Poitiers , Henry the Young King , Matilda, Duchess of Saxony , Richard I of England and Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany . She was also an older sister of Joan of Sicily and John of England .

When she was eighteen years old, in September 1180, she was married to Alfonso VIII . The marriage was arranged to secure the Pyrennean border, with Gascony offered as her dowry.

Of all Eleanor of Aquitaine's daughters, her namesake Eleanor best inherited her mother's political influence. She was almost as powerful as her husband, who specified in his will that she was to rule alongside their son in the event of his death. It was she who persuaded him to marry their daughter Berenguela to the king of Leon in the interest of peace.

When Alfonso died, his queen was reportedly so devastated with grief that she was unable to preside over the burial. Their daughter Berenguela instead performed these honors. Leonora then took sick and died only twenty-eight days after her husband, and was buried at Las Huelgas abbey in Burgos.

Children
Berenguela, Queen of Castile (August 1180 - 8 November 1246 ), married King Alfonso IX of Leon
Sancho of Castile (born & died 1181)
Sancha of Castile (1182 - 3 February 1184 )
Henry of Castile (born & died 1184)
Urraca of Castile (1186-1220), married King Alfonso II of Portugal
Blanca of Castile (4 March 1188 - 26 November 1252 ), married King Louis VIII of France
Fernando of Castile (29 September 1189 - 1211)
Mafalda of Castile (1191-1204)
Constance of Castile (1195-1198)
Constanza, nun at Las Huelgas (1201-1243)
Eleanor of Castile , married King James I of Aragon
Henry I, King of Castile (14 April 1204 - 1217)

(Duplicate Line. See Person 186)

203. Agnes de Dammartin 237 (Albri de Luzarches, Count of Dammartin154, Alberic I, Count of Dammartin109, Aelis de Dammartin66, Hugues de Dammartin, Count of Dammartin34, Constance Capet18, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1166 in <Buckinghamshire>, England and died in 1237 about age 71.

Agnes married Guillaume de Fiennes, Seigneur de Fiennes, Baron de Tingry,313 son of Enguerrand I de Fiennes, Seigneur de Fiennes and Sybil de Boulogne, in 1190. Guillaume was born about 1160 in <Wendover, Buckinghamshire>, England and died about 1241 about age 81. Another name for Guillaume was William de Fiennes Seigneur de Fiennes, Baron de Tingry.

Noted events in his life were:

• Living: 1220-1233.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 277 M    i. Ingelram II de Fiennes 314 was born about 1210 in <Tolleshunt, Essex>, England and died in 1265 in Conde, Calivados, France about age 55.

+ 278 F    ii. Mahaud de Fiennes .315

204. Simon de Dammartin, Count of Aumale 238 (Albri de Luzarches, Count of Dammartin154, Alberic I, Count of Dammartin109, Aelis de Dammartin66, Hugues de Dammartin, Count of Dammartin34, Constance Capet18, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in 1239.

205. Juliane de Dammartin 239 (Albri de Luzarches, Count of Dammartin154, Alberic I, Count of Dammartin109, Aelis de Dammartin66, Hugues de Dammartin, Count of Dammartin34, Constance Capet18, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

206. Agnes FitzWilliam 241 (William FitzNigell, 2nd Baron of Halton155, Sir Nigell FitzIvo, 1st Baron of Halton110, Emme, de Bretagne67, Geoffrey, de Bretagne35, Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1114 in East Halton, Skipton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England and died in 1166 about age 52. Another name for Agnes was Agnes FitzNigell.

Research Notes: Sister of William FitzWilliam, 3rd Baron of Halton.

Agnes married Eustace FitzJohn, 4th Baron of Halton,243 son of John FitzNigell and Unknown, about 1127 in Flamborough, East Riding, Yorkshire, England. Eustace was born about 1110 in Ewyas Harrold, Hereford, England and died on 3 Jul 1157 about age 47. Another name for Eustace was Eustace Fitz John.

Birth Notes: http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f51/a0025188.htm has b. 1110 in Knaresborough, Yorkshire, England.

Death Notes: Killed fighting the Welsh.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Barons of Halton :

4 Eustace FitzJohn
(1150-1157)
He obtained the title by marriage, his second wife being the sister of William FitzWilliam. He had inherited the barony of Knaresborough and by his first marriage had also gained the baronies of Malton and Alnwick .[8] He was killed fighting the Welsh.[5]

Noted events in his life were:

• Baron of Halton: 1150-1157. by marriage

The child from this marriage was:

+ 279 M    i. Richard FitzEustace, 5th Baron of Halton 316 was born about 1128 in East Halton, Skipton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England and died between 1157 and 1163.

207. William FitzWilliam, 3rd Baron of Halton 242 (William FitzNigell, 2nd Baron of Halton155, Sir Nigell FitzIvo, 1st Baron of Halton110, Emme, de Bretagne67, Geoffrey, de Bretagne35, Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died about 1150 in Normandy, (France).

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Barons of Halton :

3 William FitzWilliam
(1134-1150)
The son of William FitzNigel. In 1134 he moved the priory from Runcorn to a site to the east of Halton. This became Norton Priory .[7] William died childless in Normandy.[8]

Noted events in his life were:

• Baron of Halton: 1134-1150.

208. Eustace FitzJohn, 4th Baron of Halton 243 (John FitzNigell156, Sir Nigell FitzIvo, 1st Baron of Halton110, Emme, de Bretagne67, Geoffrey, de Bretagne35, Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1110 in Ewyas Harrold, Hereford, England and died on 3 Jul 1157 about age 47. Another name for Eustace was Eustace Fitz John.

Birth Notes: http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f51/a0025188.htm has b. 1110 in Knaresborough, Yorkshire, England.

Death Notes: Killed fighting the Welsh.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Barons of Halton :

4 Eustace FitzJohn
(1150-1157)
He obtained the title by marriage, his second wife being the sister of William FitzWilliam. He had inherited the barony of Knaresborough and by his first marriage had also gained the baronies of Malton and Alnwick .[8] He was killed fighting the Welsh.[5]

Noted events in his life were:

• Baron of Halton: 1150-1157. by marriage

Eustace married Agnes FitzWilliam,241 daughter of William FitzNigell, 2nd Baron of Halton and Aliva, about 1127 in Flamborough, East Riding, Yorkshire, England. Agnes was born about 1114 in East Halton, Skipton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England and died in 1166 about age 52. Another name for Agnes was Agnes FitzNigell.

Research Notes: Sister of William FitzWilliam, 3rd Baron of Halton.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 206)

209. Henry Fitz Hervey, Lord of Ravensworth 244 (Hervey, of Ravensworth157, Acarius Fitz Bardolph, of Rafenswad111, Bardolph, Lord of Ravenswath68, Eudes, Comté de Bretagne36, Geoffroi, Duc de Bretagne19, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died after 16 May 1212 in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/2223.htm :
Henry Fitz Hervey (ob. 1201), who married Alice, daughter of Randolph Fitz Walter de Greystocke (ob. 12 John 1211), from whom descended the Barons Fitz Hugh. He witnessed a charter of Duke Conan, in 1165, one of Conan de Asch, in 1196; and was a witness with his brother Alan, to the charters of Peter Fitz Thornfinn, and of Gilbert Fitz Alan, 1196-98.

~ Irish Pedigrees: Or, the Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, pp. 104-105
• Background Information. 141
Henry Fitz Hervey, of Ravensworth, Cotherstone, Hinton &c. was alive on 16 May 1212 according to the Close Roll, 14 Joh., m.9. He was married to Alice, daughter of Randolf Fitz Wauter of Greystock.

Henry Fitz Hervey's father, Hervey, was forester of the New Forest and Arkengarthale, Yorkshire, by the grant of Conan, Duke of Brittany, and son and heir of Akaris Fitz Bardof, which Bardolf was brother of Bodin, who held Ravensworth, Micleton, Romaldkirk &c according to the Domesday Survey.

~ Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, Vol. V, (Fitz Henry), pp. 416-417, footnote (d)

Henry married Alice de Greystoke,317 daughter of Ranulf de Greystoke, Lord of Greystoke and Amabel,. Alice died after 1212.

Research Notes: From http://cybergata.com/roots/2226.htm :
Henry Fitz Hervey, of Ravensworth, Cotherstone, Hinton &c. was alive on 16 May 1212 according to the Close Roll, 14 Joh., m.9. He was married to Alice, daughter of Randolf Fitz Wauter of Greystock.

~ Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, Vol. V, (Fitz Henry), p. 416, footnote (d)


The child from this marriage was:

+ 280 M    i. Ranulf Fitz Henry 318 died before 13 Jan 1243 in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

210. Adelize de Gernon 246 (Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester158, Ranulph II, Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy112, Alice, of Normandy69, Richard III, Duke of Normandy37, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1094 in <Hertford, Hertfordshire>, England and died in 1128 about age 34. Other names for Adelize were Alice de Gernon, Alicia de Gernon, Adeliza de Meschines, and Alice de Meschines.

Birth Notes: Wikipedia has b. abt 1102

Adelize married Richard FitzGilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Hertford,319 son of Gilbert FitzRichard, de Clare and Adelaide de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, about 1116. Richard was born between 1084 and 1090 in <Hertford, Hertfordshire>, England, was christened in Clare, Suffolk, England, died on 15 Apr 1136 in [near Abergavenny], Monmouthshire, England, and was buried in Gloucester. Other names for Richard were Richard de Clare Earl of Hertford and Earl of Clare, Richard FitzGilbert de Clare Lord of Clare, Suffolk, Richard Fitz Gilbert Lord of Clare, and Suffolk.

Death Notes: Slain by the Welsh near Abergavenny

Research Notes: From thepeerage.com:
Richard FitzGilbert was also known as Richard de Clare.1 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Lord of Clare [feudal baron] circa 1117.1 He is supposed to have been created Earl of Hertford by King Stephen I (or by King Henry I), but Cokayne states that there is no grounds for this belief.1 He founded the Priory of Tonbridge.1 He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.

--------
From Wikipedia - Richard de Clare, 1st Earl of Hertford :

Lineage
Richard FitzGilbert de Clare. 1st Earl of Hertford
(1094-15 April 1136 ) was the son of Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare and Alice de Claremont also known as Adeliza de Claremont .
He founded the priory of Tonbridge .

Welsh revolt
Richard held the Lordship of Ceredigion in Wales . A Welsh revolt against Norman rule had begun in south Wales where, on 1 January 1136 the Welsh won a victory over the local Norman forces between Loughor and Swansea .


Ambush & death
Richard had been away from his lordship in the early part of the year. Returning to the borders of Wales in April, he ignored warnings of the danger and pressed on toward Ceredigion with only a small force. He had not gone far when he was ambushed and killed by the men of Gwent under Iorwerth ab Owain and his brother Morgan, grandsons of Caradog ap Gruffydd , in a woody tract called "the ill-way of Coed Grano", near Llanthony Abbey , north of Abergavenny .

Spur for Welsh invasion
The news of Richard's death induced Owain Gwynedd , son of Gruffydd ap Cynan , king of Gwynedd to invade his Lordship. In alliance with Gruffydd ap Rhys of Deheubarth , he won a crushing victory over the Normans at the Battle of Crug Mawr , just outside Cardigan . The town of Cardigan was taken and burnt, and Richard's widow, Adelize, took refuge in Cardigan Castle , which was successfully defended by Robert fitz Martin . She was rescued by Miles of Gloucester who led an expedition to bring her to safety in England .

Noted events in his life were:

• Lord of Clare, Suffolk:

Children from this marriage were:

+ 281 F    i. Alice de Clare 320 was born about 1102 in <Tunbridge, Kent>, England and died after 1148 in England.

+ 282 M    ii. Gilbert de Clare 321 was born in 1115 in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England and died in 1153 at age 38.

+ 283 M    iii. Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford 322 was born in 1116 in <Tunbridge Castle>, Kent, England, died in 1173 in Oxfordshire, England at age 57, and was buried in Eynsham Priory, Oxfordshire, England.

211. Ranulf IV, de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester 218 (Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester158, Ranulph II, Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy112, Alice, of Normandy69, Richard III, Duke of Normandy37, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1100 in Gernon Castle, Normandy, France, died on 16 Dec 1153 about age 53, and was buried in St. Werburg's, Chester, Cheshire, England. Other names for Ranulf were Ranulph de Gernon 2nd Earl of Chester, Ranulph de Gernon Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches in Normandy, Ranulf de Guernan Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches, and Ranulph "de Gernon" de Meschines Earl of Chester.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester :

Ranulf II, also known as Ranulf le Meschin or Ranulf de Gernon inherited his palatine earldom in 1128 aged 28, upon the death of his father who was descended from the Counts of Bayeux , Calvados Normandy .

2 Chronology of Ranulf's life
2.1 The loss of the Earl's northern lands to King David of Scotland (1136-1139)
2.2 Ranulf takes Lincoln (1140)
2.3 The Battle of Lincoln (2 February 1141)
2.4 The capture of Robert of Gloucester
2.5 The second siege of Lincoln (1144)
2.6 Ranulf defects to the King (1145-1146)
2.7 Agreement between King David and Earl Ranulf
2.8 Ranulf's treaty with Robert Earl of Leicester
3 Monastic foundation
3.1 The death of the Earl (1153)


Early life
Note: He is the 4th Ranulf (ie Ranulf IV) but he is the 2nd Earl of Chester.

Ranulf was born at Gernon castle , Normandy around 1100 to Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester (should be: Ranulf III, 1st Earl of Chester [of the second creation]) and Lucia Taillebois of Mercia , England. His parents were both significant landowners and he had considerable autonomy within the palatine .

[Much more available in Wikipedia]

Monastic foundation
He founded a North Welsh Cistercian Abbey in 1131 which was colonised by monks from the Norman house, the Congregation of Savigny .

[edit ] The death of the Earl (1153)
In 1153 Ranulf survived a failed attempt at murder by poison by one of his arch-enemies, William Peverel the Younger , when he was guest at Peverel's house. William had poisoned the wine that Ranulf and his men had drunk. Three of Ranulf's men died but the Earl recovered, though he suffered agonizingly, as he had drunk less than his men. William was exiled from England after Henry took the crown as he was accused of poisoning Ranulf and his retainers. The Earl died the same year (due to the poisoning?), on the 16 December 1153 . One other notable event of 1153, was that Duke Henry granted Ranulf Staffordshire . After his death, the Earl's son and heir Hugh was allowed to inherit Ranulf's lands as held in 1135, and other honours bestowed upon Ranulf were revoked.

Ranulf married Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester,160 daughter of Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester and Mabel FitzHamon, of Gloucester, about 1141. Maud was born about 1120 in Glouchestershire, England and died on 29 Jul 1190 in Chester, Cheshire, England about age 70. Another name for Maud was Maud de Caen of Gloucester.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Maud of Gloucester

Maud of Gloucester, Countess of Chester (died 29 July 1190), also known as Maud FitzRobert, was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman, and the daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester , an illegitimate son of King Henry I of England . Her husband was Ranulf de Gernon , 4th Earl of Chester, whom she allegedly poisoned with the assistance of William Peverel of Nottingham .[1]

Family
Lady Maud FitzRobert was born on an unknown date, the daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester and Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester . She had seven siblings including William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Roger, Bishop of Worcester . She also had an illegitimate half-brother, Richard, Bishop of Bayeux, whom her father sired by Isabel de Douvres.

Her paternal grandparents were King Henry I of England and his mistress, Sybil Corbet. Her maternal grandparents were Robert FitzHamon , Lord of Gloucester and Glamorgan , and Sybil de Montgomery, daughter of Roger de Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and Mabel Talvas of Belleme.


Marriage and children
Sometime before 1141, Lady Maud married Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester. She assumed the title of Countess of Chester upon her marriage. Her husband had considerable autonomy in his palatine earldom.

Shortly after their marriage, in January 1141, Maud was besieged at Lincoln Castle by the forces of King Stephen of England . A relief army, loyal to Empress Matilda and led by her father, defeated the King in the fierce fighting which followed, which became known as the First Battle of Lincoln . In return for his help in repelling the King's troops, Maud's father compelled Ranulf to swear fealty to his half-sister Matilda. Ranulf was seized by King Stephen at court in Northampton on 29 August 1146. Stephen later granted him the castle and city of Lincoln sometime after 1151.[2]

Together Ranulf and Maud had three children:
Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester (1147- 30 June 1181), married Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux, by whom he had five children, including Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester , Maud of Chester , and Hawise of Chester, 1st Countess of Lincoln .
Richard of Chester (died 1170/1175), buried in Coventry .
Beatrice of Chester, married Raoul de Malpas
Ranulf had an illegitimate son, Robert FitzCount (died before 1166), by an unknown mistress. His date of birth was not recorded. Robert married as her second husband, Agnes FitzNeel.

On 16 December 1153, Maud allegedly poisoned her husband with the assistance of William Peverel of Nottingham. In 1172, she founded Repton Priory in Derbyshire .[3]

The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property Wadinton de feodo comitis Cestrie, held by Maud, Countess of Chester.[2]

Maud died on 29 July 1190. The Annals of Tewkesbury records the death in 1190 of Maud, Countess of Chester.[2]

(Duplicate Line. See Person 140)

212. Maud la Meschine 248 (William le Meschin, Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire159, Ranulph II, Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy112, Alice, of Normandy69, Richard III, Duke of Normandy37, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1126 in <Harringworth, Northumberland>, England and died after 1190. Other names for Maud were Matilda la Meschin, Matilda de Meschines, and Maud de Meschines.

Research Notes: Daughter and coheiress of William le Meschin; inherited manor of Molland, Devon, held by her maternal grandfather, Robert de Rumilly.

Maud married Philip de Belmeis, Lord of Tong, Salop and Ashby, co. Leicester,324 son of Walter de Belmeis and Unknown, by 1138 or 1139. Philip was born about 1110 in <Harringworth, Northamptonshire>, England. Another name for Philip was Phillip de Belmeis.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132C-27 and 132B-27 (Maud la Meschin)


The child from this marriage was:

+ 284 F    i. Alice de Belmeis 106 was born about 1160 in <Harringworth, Northamptonshire>, England.

Maud next married Hugh de Mortimer, Lord Mortimer of Wigmore, Herefordshire,325 son of Ralph de Mortimer and Milisent Ferrers, Betw 1148 and 1153. Hugh was born about 1108 in <Wigmore, Herefordshire>, England and died in 1181 about age 73.

Death Notes: FamilySearch has d. 1185

Research Notes: Second husband of Maud la Meschin.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132C-27 and 132B-27 (Maud la Meschin)

From Wikipedia - Hugh de Mortimer :

Hugh de Mortimer (before 1117 to 26 Feb 1180/1) was a Norman English medieval baron .


Lineage
The son of Hugh de Mortimer (b ? - d 26 Feb 1148/50), the son of Ralf de Mortimer , he was Lord of Wigmore Castle , Cleobury Mortimer and at times, Bridgnorth , Bishop's Castle and Maelienydd .

Anarchy
During the Anarchy of King Stephen 's reign, Mortimer was an ardant royalist until at least 1148. This was because Wigmore Castle had been confiscated from his father by King Henry I . He only seems to have returned to England from his Norman estates in 1137.

Private Wars
He did quarrel violently with his neighbouring Lords, most notably with Miles, earl of Hereford , his son Roger and Josse de Dinant , lord of Ludlow . The latter ambushed Mortimer and only released him after the payment of a substantial ransom. During this time Mortimer also took over the Royal castle at Bridgnorth .

Opposition to King Henry II
Hugh was one of the Barons who objected to Henry II 's demand for the return of Royal castles in 1155. Henry II launched a campaign in May 1155 against Hugh, simultaneously besieging his three principal castles of Wigmore , Bridgnorth and Cleobury Castles. On 7 July 1155 , Hugh formally submitted to Henry II at the Council at Bridgnorth. He was allowed to keep his own two castles (though Cleobury had been destroyed during the siege) but Bridgnorth returned to the crown[1].

Marriage & Issue
Between 1148 and 1153 Hugh married Maud Le Meschin , daughter of William Le Meschin , lord of Skipton , Yorkshire, and Cecily de Rumigny . Matilda was the widow of Philip Belmeis of Tong . Their son Roger Mortimer of Wigmore succeeded his father as lord of Wigmore.

Noted events in his life were:

• Lord of Wigmore Castle:

• Lord of Cleobury Mortimer:

The child from this marriage was:

+ 285 M    i. Roger de Mortimer, of Wigmore 326 was born before 1153 in <Wigmore, Herefordshire>, England, died on 24 Jun 1214 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England, and was buried in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

213. Clémence de Bar-le-Duc, Countess of Dammartin 250 (Renaud I, Count of Mousson, Count of Bar-le-Duc160, Ermentrude, of Burgundy114, Guillaume I de Bourgogne70, Adelais, de Normandie38, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1110 in <Dammartin, Île-de-France>, France and died after 20 Jan 1183. Another name for Clémence was Clemence de Bar.

Noted events in her life were:

• Living: 1183.

Clémence married Renaud, de Clermont.327

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis:

Clémence next married Renaud II, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis,328 son of Hugh de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis and Marguerite de Rameru, about 1140. Renaud was born about 1108 in Clermont, Oise, France and died about 1162 about age 54. Another name for Renaud was Renaud de Clermont.

Research Notes: Second husband of Clémence de Bar-le-Duc. Fathered at least 7 children.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 286 F    i. Mathilda, of Clermont, Ponthieu & Dammartin 236 was born about 1138 in <Pontieu, Ain>, France and died after Oct 1200.

214. Peter, of France, Count of Montargis and Courtenay 251 (Adelaide, of Savoy161, Gisele, of Burgundy115, Guillaume I de Bourgogne70, Adelais, de Normandie38, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1125 and died between 1179 and 1183 in Palestine.

Research Notes: Crusader in 1147.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 117-25. Line 107-26 (Elizabeth de Courtenay) has b. abt. 1121, d. 1179-10 Apr 1183.

Peter married Elizabeth de Courtenay, Dame de Courtenay, daughter of Renaud de Courtenay, Sire de Courtenay and Helvis, du Donjon and Corbeil, about 1150. Elizabeth was born before 1150 and died after 1205. Another name for Elizabeth was Isabel de Courtenay Dame de Courtenay.

Research Notes: Heiress of Courtenay.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 107-26

(Duplicate Line. See Person 167)

215. Maud, of Savoy 169 (Amadeus III, Count of Savoy, Maurienne and Turin162, Gisele, of Burgundy115, Guillaume I de Bourgogne70, Adelais, de Normandie38, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1125 in <Chambéry, Savoie>, France, died on 4 Nov 1158 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal at age 33, and was buried in Igreja Santa Cruz, Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal. Other names for Maud were Mafalda of Savoy, Mahaut of Savoy, Mathilda of Savoy, and Matilde Countess of Savoy.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots has d. 1157

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Maud of Savoy :

Maud of Savoy (1125 -1158 ), also known as Mafalda, Mahaut or Matilda (in Portuguese always as Mafalda),was the first queen of Portugal. She was Queen consort of Portugal through her marriage to King Afonso I of Portugal (of the House of Burgundy ; first king of Portugal ) in 1146 .
She was the second or third daughter of Amadeus III of Savoy , Count of Savoy and Maurienne , and Mahaut of Albon (the sister of Guigues IV, Comte d'Albon , "le Dauphin").


Afonso's and Maud descendants
Henrique (died 1147 ).
Mafalda, Princess of Portugal (1148 -c.1160 ).
Urraca, princess of Portugal (1151 -1188 ), married to King Ferdinand II of León .
Sancho I, King of Portugal (1154 -1212 ), married to Dulce Berenguer of Barcelona , Princess of Aragon (daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona and Queen Petronila of Aragon ).
Teresa, Princess of Portugal (1157 -1218 ), married to Philip I of Flanders and next to Eudes III of Burgundy .
João (?-?).
Sancha (?-?).



Maud married Afonso I, King of Portugal,119 son of Henry, of Burgundy, Count of Portugal and Theresa, of Leon and Castile, before Jun 1146 in Chambéry, Savoie, France. Afonso was born on 25 Jul 1109 in Viseu, Viseu, Portugal, died on 6 Dec 1185 in Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal at age 76, and was buried in Santa Cruz Monastery, Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal. Other names for Afonso were Affonso I "the Conqueror" King of Portugal and the Algarves, Afonso Henriques King of Portugal, Alfonso I King of Portugal, and Henriquez I King of Portugal.

Research Notes: First king of Portugal.

From Wikipedia - Afonso I of Portugal :

Afonso I (English Alphonzo or Alphonse), more commonly known as Afonso Henriques (pronounced [?'fõsu ?'?ik??] ), or also Affonso (Archaic Portuguese), Alfonso or Alphonso (Portuguese-Galician ) or Alphonsus (Latin version), (Viseu , 1109 , traditionally July 25 - Coimbra , 1185 December 6 ), also known as the Conqueror (Port. o Conquistador), was the first King of Portugal , declaring his independence from León .


Life
Afonso I was the son of Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal and Teresa of León , the illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of Castile and León . He was proclaimed King on July 26 , 1139 , immediately after the Battle of Ourique , and died on December 6 , 1185 in Coimbra .

At the end of the 11th century , the Iberian Peninsula political agenda was mostly concerned with the Reconquista , the driving out of the Muslim successor-states to the Caliphate of Cordoba after its collapse. With European military aristocracies focused on the Crusades , Alfonso VI called for the help of the French nobility to deal with the Moors . In exchange, he was to give the hands of his daughters in wedlock to the leaders of the expedition and bestow royal privileges to the others. Thus, the royal heiress Urraca of Castile wedded Raymond of Burgundy , younger son of the Count of Burgundy , and her half-sister, princess Teresa of León , wedded his cousin, another French crusader, Henry of Burgundy , younger brother of the Duke of Burgundy . Henry was made Count of Portugal, a burdensome county south of Galicia , where Moorish incursions and attacks were to be expected. With his wife Teresa as co-ruler of Portugal, Henry withstood the ordeal and held the lands for his father-in-law.

From this wedlock several sons were born, but only one, Afonso Henriques (meaning "Afonso son of Henry") thrived. The boy, probably born around 1109, followed his father as Count of Portugal in 1112 , under the tutelage of his mother. The relations between Teresa and her son Afonso proved difficult. Only eleven years old, Afonso already had his own political ideas, greatly different from his mother's. In 1120 , the young prince took the side of the archbishop of Braga , a political foe of Teresa, and both were exiled by her orders. Afonso spent the next years away from his own county , under the watch of the bishop. In 1122 Afonso became fourteen, the adult age in the 12th century . He made himself a knight on his own account in the Cathedral of Zamora , raised an army , and proceeded to take control of his lands. Near Guimarães , at the Battle of São Mamede (1128 ) he overcame the troops under his mother's lover and ally Count Fernando Peres de Trava of Galicia , making her his prisoner and exiling her forever to a monastery in León . Thus the possibility of incorporating Portugal into a Kingdom of Galicia was eliminated and Afonso become sole ruler (Duke of Portugal) after demands for independence from the county's people, church and nobles. He also vanquished Alfonso VII of Castile and León , another of his mother's allies, and thus freed the county from political dependence on the crown of León and Castile . On April 6 , 1129 , Afonso Henriques dictated the writ in which he proclaimed himself Prince of Portugal.

...In 1169 , Afonso was disabled in an engagement near Badajoz by a fall from his horse , and made prisoner by the soldiers of the king of León. Portugal was obliged to surrender as his ransom almost all the conquests Afonso had made in Galicia in the previous years.

In 1179 the privileges and favours given to the Roman Catholic Church were compensated. In the papal bull Manifestis Probatum , Pope Alexander III acknowledged Afonso as King and Portugal as an independent land with the right to conquer lands from the Moors. With this papal blessing, Portugal was at last secured as a country and safe from any Castilian attempts at annexation.

In 1184 , in spite of his great age, he still had sufficient energy to relieve his son Sancho, who was besieged in Santarém by the Moors. He died shortly after, on December 6 , 1185 .

The Portuguese revere him as a hero, both on account of his personal character and as the founder of their nation . There are stories that it would take 10 men to carry his sword, and that Afonso would want to engage other monarchs in personal combat, but no one would dare accept his challenge.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 106)

216. Maud de St. Liz 254 (Maud, of Huntingdon163, Judith, of Lens117, Adelaide, of Normandy, Countess of Aumale72, Robert I, Duke of Normandy39, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in 1140. Other names for Maud were Matilda of St Liz, Maud de Senlis, and Maud de Senliz.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots, line 130-27 has "d. 1140 (or 1158/63?)"

Research Notes: From Magna Charta Barons, p. 120:

Saier de Quincey, who had a grant from Henry II. of the manor of Bushby, Northamptonshire. He m. Maud de St. Liz, probably a daughter of Simon de St. Liz, a noble Norman, who was created Earl of Northampton and Huntingdon, and his wife Maud, daughter and coheiress of Waltheof, first Earl of Northampton and Northumberland, who, conspiring against the Normans, was beheaded, in 1075, at Winchester, although his wife was a niece of the Conqueror. Waltheof was the son of Syward, the celebrated Saxon Earl of Northumberland.

Maud married Robert Fitz Richard, Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex,329 son of Richard I FitzGilbert, of Clare and Tonbridge and Rohese Giffard, about 1114. Robert was born in 1064 and died about 1136 about age 72. Another name for Robert was Robert FitzRichard Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex.

Research Notes: First husband of Maud de St. Liz.

From Wikipedia - Robert Fitz Richard :

Robert Fitz Richard (1064-1136), entitled Robert Fitz Richard, Lord of Little Dunmow, Baron of Baynard , was a Norman landowner in England. His estates near Little Dunmow are said[1] to have been given to him after confiscation from Ralph Baynard , who had them earlier[2].

He was steward under Henry I of England [3] and under Stephen of England [4]. He served for a period as High Sheriff of Yorkshire

Family
He was the son of Sir Richard Fitz Gilbert , Lord of Clare and Tonbridge (c. 1035-1090) and Rohese Giffard, (b. c. 1034), daughter of Sir Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville ,[5] and Agnes Flatel.[6]

He married (c. 1114), Maud de St. Liz, daughter of Sir Simon de St Liz, Earl of Northampton , and Maud de Huntingdon .

Children were:
Sir Walter Fitz Robert , (b. c. 1124).
Maud Fitz Robert, (b. c. 1132), Essex , who married (c. 1146, William d'Aubigny , son of Sir William d'Aubigny, Lord of Belvoir , and Cecily Bigod.


Noted events in his life were:

• Steward: under Henry II.

• High Sheriff: of Yorkshire.

• Steward: under Stephen of England.

Maud next married Saer I de Quincy, Lord of Daventry 330 after 1136. Another name for Saer was Saher I de Quincy Lord of Daventry.

Research Notes: 2nd husband of Maud de St. Liz.

From Wikipedia - Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester :

The family of de Quincy had arrived in England after the Norman Conquest , and took their name from Cuinchy in the Arrondissement of Béthune ; the personal name "Saer" was used by them over several generations. Both names are variously spelled in primary sources and older modern works, the first name being sometimes rendered Saher or Seer, and the surname as Quency or Quenci.


The first recorded Saer de Quincy (known to historians as "Saer I") was lord of the manor of Long Buckby in Northamptonshire in the earlier twelfth century, and second husband of Matilda of St Liz , stepdaughter of King David I of Scotland . This marriage produced two sons, Saer II and Robert de Quincy . It was Robert, the younger son, who was the father of the Saer de Quincy who eventually became Earl of Winchester. By her first husband Robert Fitz Richard , Matilda was also the paternal grandmother of Earl Saer's close ally, Robert Fitzwalter.
----------
From Magna Charta Barons, p. 120:
Saier de Quincey, who had a grant from Henry II. of the manor of Bushby, Northamptonshire. He m. Maud de St. Liz, probably a daughter of Simon de St. Liz, a noble Norman, who was created Earl of Northampton and Huntingdon, and his wife Maud, daughter and coheiress of Waltheof, first Earl of Northampton and Northumberland, who, conspiring against the Normans, was beheaded, in 1075, at Winchester, although his wife was a niece of the Conqueror. Waltheof was the son of Syward, the celebrated Saxon Earl of Northumberland.

Noted events in his life were:

• Lord of Long Buckby: Northamptonshire, England.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 287 M    i. Robert de Quincy, Lord of Buckley and of Fawside 263 died before 1197.

+ 288 M    ii. Saer II de Quincy .331

217. Henry, of Huntingdon, Earl of Northumberland & Huntingdon 152 (Maud, of Huntingdon163, Judith, of Lens117, Adelaide, of Normandy, Countess of Aumale72, Robert I, Duke of Normandy39, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1114 and died on 12 Jun 1152 at age 38. Another name for Henry was Henry Prince of Scotland.

Research Notes: Eldest son of David I, King of Scots.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 170-23

Henry married Ada de Warenne,98 daughter of William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester, in 1139. Ada died about 1178. Another name for Ada was Adeline de Warren.

Research Notes: Widow of Conale Petit, Earl of Brittany and Richmond. Sister of William the Lion, King of Scots.

From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

Ada de Warenne (d. ca. 1178 ), who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon , younger son of King David I of Scotland , Earl of Huntingdon by his marriage to the heiress Matilda or Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon (herself great-niece of William I of England ) and had issue. They were parents to Malcolm IV of Scotland and William I of Scotland and their youngest son became David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon . All Kings of Scotland since 1292 were the descendants of Huntingdon.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 91)

218. Roger de Toeni, de Conches 256 (Alice Huntingdon164, Judith, of Lens117, Adelaide, of Normandy, Countess of Aumale72, Robert I, Duke of Normandy39, Judith, of Brittany20, Ermengarde, of Anjou8, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1104 in <Flamsted, Hertfordshire>, England and died before 1162. Another name for Roger was Roger de Conches.

Roger married Ida, of Hainault.332 Ida was born about 1109 in <Flamsted, Hertfordshire>, England. Other names for Ida were Gertrude of Hainault and Ida de Hainault.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 289 M    i. Ralph de Toeni, de Conches 256 was born about 1130 in <Flamsted, Hertfordshire>, England and died in 1162 about age 32.

219. Aymar "Taillifer", de Valence, Comté d'Angoulême 258 (William IV Taillifer, Count of Angoulême166, Vulgrin II, Comté d'Angoulême120, William III, Count of Angoulême74, Foulques "Taillefer", Comté d'Angoulême41, Geoffroy d'Angoulême22, Gerberge, d'Anjou10, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1160 in Angoulême, France and died on 16 Jul 1202 in Limoges, France about age 42. Other names for Aymar were Aymer of Angoulême, Ademar Taillifer Count of Angoulême, Adhémar Taillifer Count of Angoulême, Aymer Taillifer de Valence, and Count of Angoulême.

Research Notes: Third child of William IV Taillifer. The last Taillifer Count of Angoulême.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 153A-27

Source: Wikipedia - Isabella of Angoulême.

See also Wikipedia - Counts and dukes of Angoulême

-----
Aymer I 1160 - 1202, the last Taillefer Count of Angoulême .

History
Aymer (or Aymar), born: c.1160 - died: 16 Jun 1202, is the third of the 6 children of William IV of Angoulême , the Count of Angoulême , and Marguerite of Turenne. His two elder brothers, Wulgrin III of Angoulême and William V of Angoulême became the Counts of Angoulême, respectively, after the death of their father in 1179 (Wulgrin first, then William V succeeding in 1181). Aymer succeeded his brother in 1186 as the Count of Angoulême.
In that same year, he married Alice of Courtenay, the daughter of Peter of Courtenay (the son of Louis VI of France ) and Elizabeth of the House of Courtenay . In 1188, they had a daughter who would play an important role in the history of England and France: Isabella of Angoulême .

Aymer died in Limoges , France on June 16th, 1202. His daughter failed to succeed him as the Countess of Angoulême, as the title passed to Mathilde of Angoulême , consort to Hugh IX of Lusignan , over the claims of Isabella of Angoulême and John of England / Aymer is the last of the Taillefer male lineage with the Count of Angoulême title.

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Angoulême: 1186-1202.

Aymar married Alix de Courtenay,259 daughter of Peter, of France, Count of Montargis and Courtenay and Elizabeth de Courtenay, Dame de Courtenay, in 1186. Alix died in 1218.

Marriage Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 117-26

The child from this marriage was:

+ 290 F    i. Isabella, of Angoulême was born about 1186, died on 31 May 1246 in Fontévrault Abbey, France about age 60, and was buried in Fontévrault Abbey, France.

220. Wulgrin III, Count of Angoulême (William IV Taillifer, Count of Angoulême166, Vulgrin II, Comté d'Angoulême120, William III, Count of Angoulême74, Foulques "Taillefer", Comté d'Angoulême41, Geoffroy d'Angoulême22, Gerberge, d'Anjou10, Geoffroi, Comté d'Anjou5, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 275-26 (Hugh IX de Lusignan)

Wulgrin married someone.

His child was:

+ 291 F    i. Mahaut de Angoulême died after 1233.

previous  11th Generation  Next



221. Alix de Courtenay 259 (Elizabeth de Courtenay, Dame de Courtenay167, Renaud de Courtenay, Sire de Courtenay122, Ermengarde, de Nevers79, Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre44, William I, Count of Nevers24, Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in 1218.

Alix married Aymar "Taillifer", de Valence, Comté d'Angoulême,258 son of William IV Taillifer, Count of Angoulême and Marguerite, de Turenne, in 1186. Aymar was born about 1160 in Angoulême, France and died on 16 Jul 1202 in Limoges, France about age 42. Other names for Aymar were Aymer of Angoulême, Ademar Taillifer Count of Angoulême, Adhémar Taillifer Count of Angoulême, Aymer Taillifer de Valence, and Count of Angoulême.

Marriage Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 117-26

Research Notes: Third child of William IV Taillifer. The last Taillifer Count of Angoulême.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 153A-27

Source: Wikipedia - Isabella of Angoulême.

See also Wikipedia - Counts and dukes of Angoulême

-----
Aymer I 1160 - 1202, the last Taillefer Count of Angoulême .

History
Aymer (or Aymar), born: c.1160 - died: 16 Jun 1202, is the third of the 6 children of William IV of Angoulême , the Count of Angoulême , and Marguerite of Turenne. His two elder brothers, Wulgrin III of Angoulême and William V of Angoulême became the Counts of Angoulême, respectively, after the death of their father in 1179 (Wulgrin first, then William V succeeding in 1181). Aymer succeeded his brother in 1186 as the Count of Angoulême.
In that same year, he married Alice of Courtenay, the daughter of Peter of Courtenay (the son of Louis VI of France ) and Elizabeth of the House of Courtenay . In 1188, they had a daughter who would play an important role in the history of England and France: Isabella of Angoulême .

Aymer died in Limoges , France on June 16th, 1202. His daughter failed to succeed him as the Countess of Angoulême, as the title passed to Mathilde of Angoulême , consort to Hugh IX of Lusignan , over the claims of Isabella of Angoulême and John of England / Aymer is the last of the Taillefer male lineage with the Count of Angoulême title.

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Angoulême: 1186-1202.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 219)

222. Peter de Courtenay, Count of Courtenay 260 (Elizabeth de Courtenay, Dame de Courtenay167, Renaud de Courtenay, Sire de Courtenay122, Ermengarde, de Nevers79, Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre44, William I, Count of Nevers24, Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1155 and died before Jan 1218 in Epirus.

Noted events in his life were:

• Count of Courtenay:

• Marquis of Namur:

• Emperor of Constantinople:

223. Robert de Courtenay 145 (Renaud de Courtenay168, Renaud de Courtenay, Sire de Courtenay122, Ermengarde, de Nevers79, Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre44, William I, Count of Nevers24, Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1170 in <Okehampton, Devonshire>, England, died on 26 Jul 1242 in Iwerne, Dorset, England at age 72, and was buried on 28 Jul 1242 in Ford Abbey, Devonshire, England.

Robert married Mary de Reviers,145 daughter of William de Reviers and Mabel de Beaumont, in 1213. Mary was born about 1183 in <Okehampton>, Devonshire, England.

Birth Notes: FamilySearch has both abt. 1196 and abt. 1183. Both say Devonshire.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 292 M    i. John de Courtenay 145 was born on 26 Jul 1224 in Okehampton, Devonshire, England, died on 3 May 1274 at age 49, and was buried on 5 May 1274 in Ford Abbey, Devonshire, England.

224. Sir Robert de Courtenay, Baron of Oakhampton 262 (Renaud de Courtenay168, Renaud de Courtenay, Sire de Courtenay122, Ermengarde, de Nevers79, Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre44, William I, Count of Nevers24, Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1183, died on 26 Jul 1242 about age 59, and was buried in Ford Abbey, Devonshire, England.

Noted events in his life were:

• Sheriff of Devon: 1216.

225. Eustacia Basset 194 (Egelina de Courtenay169, Renaud de Courtenay, Sire de Courtenay122, Ermengarde, de Nevers79, Renaud II de Nevers, Count of Nevers and Auxerre44, William I, Count of Nevers24, Adèle, of France, Countess of Auxerre12, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1176 in <Bichester, Oxfordshire>, England and died in 1215 about age 39.

Eustacia married Richard de Camville, of Stratton Audley,333 son of Gerald Camville and Nichola Haye, about 1203 in Middleton, Oxfordshire, England. Richard was born about 1177 in <Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire>, England.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 293 F    i. Idoine de Camville 334 was born about 1209 in <Brattleby, Lincolnshire>, England and died on 1 Jan 1251 about age 42.

+ 294 F    ii. Isabel de Camville 335 was born in 1152 and died after 1208.

226. Lorette de Quincy (Margaret de Beaumont170, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester123, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1).

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester :
Lorette who married Sir William de Valognes

227. Robert de Quincy 264 (Margaret de Beaumont170, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester123, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in 1217.

Research Notes: Eldest son, first son named Robert. (There were two.)

From Wikipedia - Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester :

"Robert (d. 1217). Some sources say he married Hawise, sister and co-heiress of Ranulf de Blundeville, earl of Chester . However, it is more likely Hawise married Saer's brother Robert II;"
----------
Ancestral Roots, Line 54-28 (Robert II de Quincy), has "d.v.p. bef. 1232,... m. Hawise of Chester (125-29), b. 1180, d. 1241/3, Countess of Lincoln." The "d.v.p. bef. 1232 makes this one appear to be the first Robert.
----------
From Magna Charta Barons, pp. 121-122 (this could be in error):
Robert de Quincey, who d. in the Holy Land, having issue by his wife Hawyse, daughter of Hugh de Keveliock (or Bohun), Powys, Wales, fifth Earl Palatine of Chester, d. 1181, and his wife Bertred, daughter of Simon, Earl of Evereux, in Normandy, an only daughter, Margaret, wife of John de Lacie, Earl of Lincoln, one of the celebrated twenty-five Magna Charta Sureties.

Robert married someone.

228. Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester 265 (Margaret de Beaumont170, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester123, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1174 in <Winchester>, Hampshire, England, died on 25 Apr 1264 in England about age 90, and was buried in Brackley, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Another name for Roger was Roger de Quincey 2nd Earl of Winchester.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester :

Roger , who succeeded his father as earl of Winchester (though he did not take formal possession of the earldom until after his mother's death);
----------
From Magna Charta Barons, p. 122:
Roger de Quincey, second son, who had livery of his father's lands, although his elder brother [Robert] was alive in the Holy Land, and succeeded to the earldom of Winchester, and in right of his first wife, daughter of Alan, lord of Galloway, became lord high constable of Scotland. By this lady he had only three daughters,--Margaret, wife of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby; Elizabeth, wife of Alexander Comyn, Scotch Earl of Buchan; and Ela, wife of Alan, Baron le Zouche, of Ashby. Earl Roger m. secondly, Maud, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, and widow of Anselme le Mareschall, Earl of Pembroke, and m. thirdly, Alianore, daughter of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby, and widow of William, Baron de Vaux, who survived him, and m. Roger de Leybourne. Dugdale states that Earl Roger had a fourth daughter, but by which wife it is unknown, named Isabella, with whom a contract of marriage was made by John, son of Hugh de Nevill, for his son Hugh. His lordship d. 1264, when the earldom became extinct, and his great landed possessions devolved upon his daughters, as coheiresses.
-----------
From Wikipedia - Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester :

Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester (1195? - 25 April 1265 ) was a medieval nobleman who was prominent on both sides of the Anglo-Scottish border , as Earl of Winchester and Constable of Scotland .

He was the second son of Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester , and Margaret de Beaumont .

He probably joined his father on the Fifth Crusade in 1219, where the elder de Quincy fell sick and died. His elder brother having died a few years earlier, Roger thus inherited his father's titles and properties. However, he did not take possession of his father's lands until February 1221, probably because he did not return to England from the crusade until then. He did not formally become earl until after the death of his mother in 1235.

Roger married Helen , eldest daughter and co-heiress of Alan, Lord of Galloway . Without legitimate sons to succeed him, Alan's lands and dignities were divided between the husbands of his three daughters, so Roger acquired Alan's position as Constable of Scotland , and one-third of the lordship of Galloway (although the actual title of Lord of Galloway went through Helen's half-sister Devorguilla to her husband John I de Balliol ).

The Galwegians rebelled under Gille Ruadh , not wanting their land divided, but the rebellion was suppressed by Alexander II of Scotland . Roger ruled his portion of Galloway strictly, and the Galwegians revolted again in 1247, forcing Roger to take refuge in a castle. Faced with a siege and little chance of relief, Roger and a few men fought their way out and rode off to seek help from Alexander, who raised forces to again suppress the rebellion.

In the following years Roger was one of the leaders of the baronial opposition to Henry III of England , although he fought for Henry against the Welsh in the 1250s and 1260s.

Following Helen's death in 1245, Roger married Maud de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford , around 1250. Maud died only two years later, and Roger married his third wife, Eleanor Ferrers, daughter of William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby the same year.

Roger had three daughters by his first wife, but no sons. His subsequent marriages produced no issue. After his death his estates were divided between the daughters, and the earldom of Winchester lapsed. The three daughters of Roger and Helen of Galloway were:
Helen (also known as Ela or Elena), who married Alan Baron Zouche of Ashby;
Elizabeth (also known as Isabella), who married Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan ;
Margaret, who married William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby (and was thus stepmother to her own stepmother).

Noted events in his life were:

• Constable of Scotland:

Roger married Helen, of Galloway,336 daughter of Alan, Lord of Galloway and Helen de L'Isle,. Helen was born about 1208 in <Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland> and died on 21 Nov 1245 in England about age 37. Another name for Helen was Elena of Galloway.

Research Notes: First wife of Roger de Quincy.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 295 F    i. Margaret de Quincy 337 was born in 1218 in <Winchester>, Hampshire, England and died on 12 Mar 1280 at age 62.

+ 296 F    ii. Elizabeth de Quincey .338

+ 297 F    iii. Helen de Quincy, of Brackley 339 was born about 1222 in <Winchester, Hampshire>, England and died Sh. Bef. 20 Aug 1296 in England about age 74.

229. Robert II de Quincy 266 (Margaret de Beaumont170, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester123, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died in 1257 in <Palestine>. Other names for Robert were Robert de Quincey and Robert the Younger de Quincey.

Research Notes: Second son named Robert.

From Wikipedia - Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester :

Robert de Quincy (second son of that name; d. 1257) who married Helen , daughter of the Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great ;

"Robert (d. 1217). Some sources say he married Hawise, sister and co-heiress of Ranulf de Blundeville, earl of Chester . However, it is more likely Hawise married Saer's brother Robert II;"
---------
Ancestral Roots, Line 54-28 (Robert II de Quincy), has "d.v.p. bef. 1232,... m. Hawise of Chester (125-29), b. 1180, d. 1241/3, Countess of Lincoln." The "d.v.p. bef. 1232 makes him appear to be the first Robert.


Noted events in his life were:

• Crusader:

Robert married Elen ferch Llywelyn Fawr,340 daughter of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Gwynedd and Joan, Princess of Gwynedd, after 1237. Elen was born about 1207 and died in 1253 about age 46. Other names for Elen were Helene, Elen verch Llywelyn, and Helen verch Llywelyn.

Research Notes: If Robert II de Quincy was the husband of Hawise of Chester, Elen was his second wife. Magna Charta Barons lists only Elen and has her as the mother of his 3 daughters. Magna Charta Barons is not a reliable source.

From Wikipedia - Elen ferch Llywelyn :

Elen ferch Llywelyn (c. 1206 - 1253) was the daughter of Llywelyn the Great of Gwynedd in north Wales .

The records of Llywelyn's family are confusing, and it is not certain which of his children were illegitimate, but Elen appears to have been his legitimate daughter by Joan , illegitimate daughter of King John of England .

Elen married John de Scotia, Earl of Chester , in about 1222. He died aged thirty in 1237, and she re-married, her second husband being Sir Robert de Quincy . Their daughter, Hawise , was married to Baldwin Wake , Lord Wake of Lidel. Hawise and Baldwin's granddaughter, Margaret Wake , was the mother of Joan of Kent , later Princess of Wales. Thus the blood of Llywelyn Fawr passed into the English royal family through King Richard II .

There is also a record of a "Helen" daughter of "Llywelyn of Wales" who married Mormaer Maol Choluim II, Earl of Fife and later married Domhnall I, Earl of Mar . The dates appear to rule out this being Elen, since Maol Chaluim II did not die until 1266 while Elen's death is recorded in 1253. Some genealogists propose the existence of another Elen, an illegitimate daughter born towards the end of Llywelyn's life, but there is no clear evidence for this. Another possibility is that this Helen might have been an illegitimate daughter of Llywelyn the Last born when he was a young man, but there is also no evidence of the theory being true. More likely this lady was Susannah ferch Llywelyn ab Iorwerth , who was sent to England in 1228 and married the earl of Fife in the summer of 1237.[1]

Robert next married Hawise, of Chester, Countess of Lincoln,298 daughter of Hugh, of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort, of Evreux,. Hawise was born in 1180 and died between 1241 and 1243. Another name for Hawise was Hawyse of Chester.

Research Notes: Sister and coheiress of Ranulph de Meschines, fourth Earl of Chester and Lincoln.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 298 F    i. Margaret de Quincy 341 was born about 1209 and died in Mar 1266 in Hempstead Marshall, England about age 57.

230. Hawise de Quincy 267 (Margaret de Beaumont170, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester123, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1). Another name for Hawise was Hawyse de Quincey.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford

Hawise married Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford,342 son of Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford and Isabella de Bolebec, after 11 Feb 1223. Hugh was born about 1210 in Oxfordshire, England and died before 23 Dec 1263.

Research Notes: 6th Earl of Oxford and Great Chamberlain of England.

From Wikipedia - Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford

Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford (c. 1210 - December , 1263 ) was the only child and heir of Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford . Hugh was born c. 1210. His father died in 1221, and Hugh made homage for his earldom in 1231. He was knighted around the same time. He supposedly also took part in the Seventh Crusade , in 1248-1254. In 1223, Hugh married Hawise Quincy, daughter of Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester , and his wife, Margaret Beaumont. When he died in 1263, he was succeeded by his son Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford .

Noted events in his life were:

• Hereditary Master Chamberlain of England:

The child from this marriage was:

+ 299 M    i. Robert III de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford 343 was born in 1240 in Oxfordshire, England and died on 2 Sep 1296 at age 56.

231. Arabella de Quincy 268 (Margaret de Beaumont170, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester123, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1186 and died in 1258 at age 72.

Arabella married Richard de Harcourt, son of Robert de Harcourt, of Stanton-Harcourt, Oxfordshire and Isabel de Camville,. Richard was born in 1182.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 300 F    i. Emma de Harcourt 344 was born in 1187 in Defford, Worcestershire, England and died in 1265 at age 78.

232. Isabel de Clare 270 (Amice FitzWilliam, Countess of Gloucester175, Hawise de Beaumont, of Leicester124, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1178.

233. Sir Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester 271 (Amice FitzWilliam, Countess of Gloucester175, Hawise de Beaumont, of Leicester124, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1180 in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England, died on 25 Oct 1230 in Penros, Brittany, France about age 50, and was buried in Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

Research Notes: 7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester.

From Wikipedia - Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford :

Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford (1180 - October 25 , 1230 ) was the son of Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford , from whom he inherited the Clare estates, from his mother, Amice Fitz William, the estates of Gloucester and the honour of St. Hilary, and from Rohese, an ancestor, the moiety of the Giffard estates. In June 1202, he was entrusted with the lands of Harfleur and Montrevillers .

In 1215 Gilbert and his father were two of the barons made Magna Carta sureties and championed Louis "le Dauphin" of France in the First Barons' War , fighting at Lincoln under the baronial banner. He was taken prisoner in 1217 by William Marshal , whose daughter Isabel he later married.

In 1223 he accompanied his brother-in-law, Earl Marshal , in an expedition into Wales. In 1225 he was present at the confirmation of the Magna Carta by Henry III . In 1228 he led an army against the Welsh, capturing Morgan Gam , who was released the next year. He then joined in an expedition to Brittany , but died on his way back to Penrose in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranborne to Tewkesbury . His widow Isabel later married Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall & King of the Romans . His own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.

Hertford had six children by his wife Isabel , née Marshal:[1]
Agnes de Clare (b. 1218)
Amice de Clare (1220-1287), who married the 6th Earl of Devon
Richard de Clare (1222-1262)
Isabel de Clare (1226-1264), who married the 5th Lord of Annandale
William de Clare (1228-1258)
Gilbert de Clare (b. 1229)

Noted events in his life were:

• Magna Charta Surety: 1215.

• 5th Earl of Hertford: 1217-1230.

• Earl of Gloucester: 1217-1230.

Gilbert married Isabel Marshal,345 daughter of Sir William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, on 9 Oct 1217. Isabel died on 17 Jan 1240 in Berkhampstead, England. Another name for Isabel was Isabel Marshall.

Research Notes: Co-heiress of Sir William Marshal.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 301 F    i. Agnes de Clare 346 was born in 1218.

+ 302 F    ii. Amice de Clare 346 was born in 1220 and died in 1287 at age 67.

+ 303 M    iii. Sir Richard de Clare, 8th Earl of Clare 347 was born on 4 Aug 1222, died on 15 Jul 1262 in Asbenfield, Waltham near Canterbury, England at age 39, and was buried in Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

+ 304 F    iv. Isabel de Clare 346 was born on 2 Nov 1226 and died on 10 Jul 1264 at age 37.

+ 305 M    v. William de Clare 346 was born in 1228 and died in 1258 at age 30.

234. Maud de Clare 272 (Amice FitzWilliam, Countess of Gloucester175, Hawise de Beaumont, of Leicester124, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1184 in Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England and died in 1213 at age 29. Another name for Maud was Matilda de Clare.

235. Richard de Clare 270 (Amice FitzWilliam, Countess of Gloucester175, Hawise de Beaumont, of Leicester124, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1184 in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England and died on 4 Mar 1228 in London, England at age 44.

236. Joan de Clare 273 (Amice FitzWilliam, Countess of Gloucester175, Hawise de Beaumont, of Leicester124, Sir Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester82, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1184 in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England.

Joan married Rhys Gwyg ap Rhys, Lord of Yestradtywy, son of Rhys ap Gruffudd ap Rhys Tewdwr, Justice of South Wales and Unknown,. Another name for Rhys was Rhys-Gryd Lord of Yestradtywy.

Research Notes: Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pennsylvania by Charles H. Browning, Philadelphia, 1912. From that book, p. 281:
"RHY-GRYD, feudal lord of Yestradywy. He m. Lady Joan, daughter of Richard de Clare*, fourth Earl of Hertford, &c., one of the celebrated twenty-five Sureties for the Magna Charta, 1215,..."

From: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, pp. 130-131:
"In Deheubarth [about 1194], Rhys ap Gruffudd was troubled by the waywardness of his sons, and the agreement between Rhys and the king of England came to an end when Henry II was succeeded by his son, Richard I, in 1189. Rhys died in 1197. His heir was his eldest son, Gruffudd, whom Chronica de Wallia referred to in 1200 as prince, the last of the rulers of Deheubarth to be given that title. Gruffudd was challenged by his brothers, Maelgwn and Rhys Gryg in particular, and following his death in 1201 the authority of his son, Rhys Ieuanc, was restricted to Cantref Mawr, the region between the rivers Tywi and Teifi. In the struggles in Deheubarth, Maelgwn received the support of John who became king of England on the death of his brother, Richard, in 1199. John had direct interests in Wals, for, through his marriage with the heiress of Glamorgan, he was lord of the greatest of the Marcher Lordships. In 1199, John bestowed Ceredigion and Emlyn on Maelgwn through royal grant.."


The child from this marriage was:

+ 306 M    i. Rhys-Mechyllt, of Llandovery Castle .

237. Mary de Reviers 145 (Mabel de Beaumont176, Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan127, Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan83, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1183 in <Okehampton>, Devonshire, England.

Birth Notes: FamilySearch has both abt. 1196 and abt. 1183. Both say Devonshire.

Mary married Robert de Courtenay,145 son of Renaud de Courtenay and Hawise de Courcy, in 1213. Robert was born in 1170 in <Okehampton, Devonshire>, England, died on 26 Jul 1242 in Iwerne, Dorset, England at age 72, and was buried on 28 Jul 1242 in Ford Abbey, Devonshire, England.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 223)

238. Isabel Mauduit 275 (Alice de Beaumont177, Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick128, Gundred de Warenne89, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1214, died before 1268, and was buried in Nunnery of Cokehill, Worcestershire, England.

Research Notes: From William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick :
His father was William de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle , his mother, Isabel Mauduit, sister and heiress of William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick .
-----
From William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick :
He was the son of Alice de Beaumont (daughter of the 4th Earl) and William de Maudit, and so was the grandson of Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick . His father was the lord of Hanslape and hereditary chamberlain of the exchequer, a title that went back to another William Maudit who held that office for Henry I .
He died without issue and the estates then passed to his sister Isabel de Maudit who had married William de Beauchamp. She died shortly after Warwick's death and the title passed to their son William .

Isabel married William de Beauchamp, 5th Baron Beauchamp,348 son of Walter de Beauchamp, of Elmley, Worcestershire and Isabella de Mortimer,. William was born about 1210 and died in 1269 about age 59. Another name for William was William de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle, Worcestershire.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick :
His father was William de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle , his mother, Isabel Mauduit, sister and heiress of William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick .

Noted events in his life were:

• 5th Baron Beauchamp:

• Will: 7 Jan 1269.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 307 M    i. William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick 349 was born about 1237 in Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England, died on 9 Jun 1298 in Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England about age 61, and was buried in Grey Friars, Worcestershire, England.

+ 308 M    ii. John De Beauchamp 350 was born about 1248 in Elmley Castle, Elmley, Worcestershire, England and died after 1298.

239. William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick 276 (Alice de Beaumont177, Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick128, Gundred de Warenne89, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1220 and died on 8 Jan 1267 about age 47.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick :

William Maudit (or Mauduit), 8th Earl of Warwick (abt 1220 - 8 January 1267 ), was an English nobleman and participant in the Barons' War .

He was the son of Alice de Beaumont (daughter of the 4th Earl) and William de Maudit, and so was the grandson of Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick . His father was the lord of Hanslape and hereditary chamberlain of the exchequer, a title that went back to another William Maudit who held that office for Henry I .

He adhered to Henry III in the wars with the barons . He was surprised in his own castle, Warwick Castle by John Giffard , the governor of Kenilworth Castle . The walls of the castle were destroyed and the countess taken prisoner to Kenilworth, and only released on payment of a ransom nineteen hundred marks.

William Mauduit made the castle in the corner of Portchester Castle (Portus Adurni) for an unknown reason. This was made in 1090 and is a Norman Castle and had palisades on each side of the castle.

He died without issue and the estates then passed to his sister Isabel de Maudit who had married William de Beauchamp. She died shortly after Warwick's death and the title passed to their son William .

240. Alan, Lord of Galloway 207 (Elena de Morville178, Avice de Lancaster129, Gundred de Warenne89, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1186 in <Galloway, Wigtownshire, Scotland>, died in 1234 about age 48, and was buried in Abbey of Dundrennan, Kirkcudbright, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland. Another name for Alan was Alan de Galloway.

Research Notes: Per Ancestral Roots, "A descendant of the English and Scottish Kings."

Noted events in his life were:

• Constable of Scotland: 1215-1234.

• Named: in the Magna Charta.

Alan married Helen de L'Isle,351 daughter of Reginald, Lord of the Isles and Fonia, of Moray, about 1205 in Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland. Helen was born about 1174 in <Galloway, Wigtownshire, Scotland> and died about 1212 about age 38. Another name for Helen was Helen de l'Isle.

Research Notes: Said to be a daughter of Reginald, Lord of the Isles


The child from this marriage was:

+ 309 F    i. Helen, of Galloway 336 was born about 1208 in <Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland> and died on 21 Nov 1245 in England about age 37.

Alan next married Margaret, of Huntingdon,153 daughter of Henry, of Huntingdon, Earl of Northumberland & Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, in 1209. Margaret died in 1201.

Research Notes: Second wife of Alan, Lord of Galloway.

(Duplicate Line. See Person 132)

Alan next married < >,352 daughter of Hugh de Lacy, Earl of Ulster and Unknown, in 1228.

Research Notes: A daughter of Hugh de Lacy, Earl of Ulster.

241. Alice d'Eu, Countess of Eu, Lady of Hastings 278 (Maud de Warenne180, Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey131, William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne90, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1191 and died on 15 May 1246 in La Mothe-Saint-Heray, Poitou about age 55. Other names for Alice were Alice d'Eu Countess of Eu, Lady of Hastings and Alix d'Eu 8th Comtesse d'Eu & 4th Lady of Hastings.

Alice married Raoul I de Lusignan,353 son of Hugh VIII "le Vieux" de Lusignan and Bourgogne de Rancon, in Sep 1213. Raoul was born between 1160 and 1165 in <Lusignan> and died on 1 May 1219 in Melle.

Research Notes: 2nd son of Hugues de Lusignan.

From Wikipedia - Raoul I of Lusignan :

Raoul I of Lusignan or Raoul I de Lusignan (1160 or 1164/1165 - Acre, Palestine , 1217 or Melle , May 1 , 1219 ), was the second son of Hugues de Lusignan, Co-Seigneur de Lusignan in 1164 (c. 1141 - 1169), and wife, married before 1162, Orengarde N, who died in 1169, and grandson of Hugh VIII . He became Seigneur d'Issoudun before 1200, Count of Eu by marriage, Seigneur de Melle, de Chize, de Civray and de La Mothe. He was buried at the Priory of Fontblanche, in Exoudun .
He married firstly c. 1210 (annulled before 1213) Marguerite de Courtenay (1194 - Marienthal , July 17 , 1270 and buried there), Dame de Chateauneuf-sur-Cher and Margravine of Namur (1229-1237), daughter of Peter II of Courtenay and second wife Yolande of Namur, Margravine of Namur , without issue. He later married secondly in September, 1213 Alix d'Eu, 8th Countess of Eu and 4th Lady of Hastings (c. 1191 - La Mothe-Saint-Heray, Poitou , May 14 or 15, 1246), daughter of Henri d'Eu (d. by March 17 , 1183 or 1190/1191), 7th Comte d'Eu and 3rd Lord of Hastings and wife as her first husband Mathilde or Maud de Warenne (c. 1162 - c. 1212 or by December 13 , 1228 ), and had two children:
Mahaut or Maud de Lusignan (c. 1210 - August 14 , 1241 , buried at Llanthony, Gloucester ), married c. 1236 as his first wife Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford and 1st Earl of Essex on April 28 , 1228 and Constable of England (bef. 1208 - Warwickshire , September 24 , 1275 , buried at Llanthony, Gloucester ), and had issue.
Raoul II de Lusignan

Noted events in his life were:

• Comte d'Eu: by marriage

The child from this marriage was:

+ 310 F    i. Mahaut de Lusignan 354 was born about 1210, died on 14 Aug 1241 about age 31, and was buried in Llanthony Secunda, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

242. John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey 280 (William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey181, Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey131, William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne90, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1231 in Surrey, England, died on 27 Dec 1304 in Kennington, Middlesex, England at age 73, and was buried in Lewes, Surrey, England.

Research Notes: From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872173 :

Name Suffix: Earl of Surrey
REFN: 1019
6th Earl of Surrey (1240-1304); styled Earl of Sussex (1282); warden of Scotland (1296-1297). A ward of Henry III of England after his father's death in 1240, John supported the King against his rebellious barons in 1258. He aided the barons from about 1260 to 1263, but rejoined Henry and fought for him at Lewes in 1264 (see RIN # 669). The King was captured during the battle and John fled to France. He returned to England with the future Edward I in 1265, and freed Henry at the battle of Evesham (see RIN # 3867). In 1282 he assumed the title of Earl of Sussex but his claim was uncertain. He joined Edward I's invasion of Scotland in 1296, took Dunbar castle in April that year and became warden of Scotland in August. On 11 September 1297 his troops were routed by William Wallace at Stirling Bridge, but the following year he helped Edward defeat Wallace at Falkirk.

!Chronciles of the Age of Chivalry: 142, 144
-------
From http://www.wrexham.gov.uk/english/heritage/holt_castle.htm (Holt Castle) :
Following the defeat of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, the last independent Prince of Wales in 1282, Edward I gave John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, the lordship of Bromfield and Yale. To secure his newly gained lands, John built Holt Castle, also known as Lion's Castle, to control a nearby strategic ford across the River Dee. John de Warenne's successor, also John, was leader of the English forces in Scotland. In 1296 he defeated the Red Comyn and the Scottish forces at the Battle of Dunbar and deposed the Scottish King John Balliol. Edward I made de Warenne Regent of Scotland. It was a job that only brought him trouble. William Wallace led a revolt and defeated de Warenne and the English at the Battle of Stirling Bridge on September 11th 1296. De Warenne was forced to flee the field of battle and make his excuses to Edward I "Longshanks".
--------
From History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, 1881, Vol. I, p. 389:
"John, Earl of Warren and Surrey, acquired the lordships of Maelor Gymraeg (Bromfield), Chirk, and Iâl, by assassinating the two infant Princes of Powys, Madog and Llywelyn, in 1281."

Noted events in his life were:

• Lord of Bromfield (Wrexham): 7 Oct 1282. Granted by Edward I after the defeat of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd. Bromfield was also known as Maelor Gymraeg at that time.

• Lord of Yale: 1282. Yale was also known as Iâl at that time.

• Granted: Castle of Dinas Bran, 7 Oct 1282. by Edward I.

• Constructed: Castle Leonis (Holt Castle), Betw 1282 and 1304, Villa Leonis (Holt), (Wrexham), Wales. in conjunction with Edward I. It is possible, however, that construction began after this John's death.

John married someone in Aug 1247.

John married Alice de Lusignan,355 daughter of Hugues X "le Brun" de Lusignan, Comté de La Marche et d'Angoulême and Isabella, of Angoulême, in Aug 1247. Alice died on 9 Feb 1256. Another name for Alice was Alfais de Lusignan.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 311 F    i. Eleanor de Warenne was born in 1251.

+ 312 M    ii. Sir William de Warenne, Earl of Surrey 356 was born in Feb 1256 in Surrey, England and died on 15 Dec 1286 in Croyden, Middlesex, England at age 30.

+ 313 M    iii. John de Warenne .357

243. Humphrey V de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford, 7th Earl of Essex 282 (Henry de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford182, Margaret, of Huntingdon132, Ada de Warenne91, Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester45, Hugh Magnus, of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France28, Henry I, of France14, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born by 1208, died on 24 Sep 1275 in Warwickshire, England at age 67, and was buried in Llanthony Secunda, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 97-28, "2nd Earl of Hereford and after div. of his mother 1236, 7th Earl of Essex, Constable of England, sheriff of Kent."

From A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, p.136:

"In the wake of the dismemberment of the de Breos empire [after the hanging of William de Breos in 1230], the Bohun and Cantelupe families joined the ranks of the leading Marcher Lords..."
--------
From Wikipedia - Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford :

Humphrey de Bohun (1208 or bef. 1208 - Warwickshire , 24 September 1275 ) was 2nd Earl of Hereford and 1st Earl of Essex , as well as Constable of England . He was the son of Henry de Bohun, 1st Earl of Hereford and Maud of Essex.

Career
He was one of the nine godfathers of Prince Edward , later to be Edward I of England .
After returning from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land , he was one of the writers of the Provisions of Oxford in 1258.

Marriage and children
He married c. 1236 Mahaut or Maud de Lusignan (c. 1210 - 14 August 1241 , buried at Llanthony, Gloucester ), daughter of Raoul I of Lusignan , Comte d'Eu by marriage, and second wife Alix d'Eu, 8th Comtesse d'Eu and 4th Lady of Hastings, and had issue. Their children were:
Humphrey de Bohun, predeceased his father in 1265.
Alice de Bohun , married Roger V de Toeni
Maud de Bohun , married (1) Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke ; (2) Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester

Death & burial
He died in 1275 and was buried at Llanthony Secunda , Gloucester .

Noted events in his life were:

• 7th Earl of Essex: 1236. After div. of his mother

• Constable of England:

• Sheriff of Kent:

Humphrey married Mahaut de Lusignan,354 daughter of Raoul I de Lusignan and Alice d'Eu, Countess of Eu, Lady of Hastings, about 1236. Mahaut was born about 1210, died on 14 Aug 1241 about age 31, and was buried in Llanthony Secunda, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England. Other names for Mahaut were Maud d'Eu and Maud de Lusignan.

Research Notes: First wife of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 97-28 (Humphrey V de Bohun).


Children from this marriage were:

+ 314 M    i. Humphrey VI de Bohun 358 died about 4 Aug 1265 in Battle of Evesham, Evesham, Worcestershire, England.

+ 315 F    ii. Alice de Bohun .359

+ 316 F    iii. Maud de Bohun .359

244. Henry II, Duke of Brabant 284 (Mathilde, of Flanders183, Matthew, of Alsace, Count of Boulogne133, Thierry I, of Lorraine, Count of Flanders94, Gertrude, of Flanders54, Robert I, Count of Flanders29, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1207 and died on 1 Feb 1248 in Leuven, Brabant, Flanders, Belgium at age 41. Other names for Henry were Hendrik II van Brabant and Henri II de Brabant.

Research Notes: Duke of Brabant and Lothier.

From Wikipedia - Henry II, Duke of Brabant :

Henry II of Brabant (French: Henri II de Brabant, Dutch: Hendrik II van Brabant, 1207 - February 1 , 1248 in Leuven ) was Duke of Brabant and Lothier after the death of his father Henry I in 1235. His mother was Mathilde of Flanders
Henry II supported his sister Mathilde's son, William II, Count of Holland , in the latter's bid for election as German King.

Family and children
His first marriage was to Marie of Hohenstaufen (April 3 , 1201 -1235, Leuven), daughter of Philip of Swabia and Irene Angelina . They had six children:
Henry III, Duke of Brabant (d. 1261)
Philip, died young
Matilda of Brabant (1224 - September 29 , 1288 ), married:
in Compiègne June 14 , 1237 to Robert I of Artois ;
before May 31 , 1254 to Guy II of Châtillon , Count of Saint Pol .
Beatrix (1225 - November 11 , 1288 ), married:
at Kreuzburg March 10 , 1241 Heinrich Raspe Landgrave of Thuringia ;
in Leuven November 1247 to William III of Dampierre, Count of Flanders (1224 - June 6 , 1251 ).
Marie of Brabant (c. 1226 - January 18 , 1256 , Donauwörth ), married Louis II, Duke of Upper Bavaria . She was beheaded by her husband on suspicion of infidelity.
Margaret (d. March 14 , 1277 ), Abbess of Herzogenthal .
His second marriage was to Sophie of Thuringia (March 20 , 1224 - May 29 , 1275 ), daughter of Ludwig IV of Thuringia and Elisabeth of Hungary by whom he had two children:
Henry (1244-1308, created Landgrave of Hesse in 1263.
Elizabeth (1243 - October 9 , 1261 ), married in Braunschweig July 13 , 1254 to Albert I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg

Henry married Marie, of Hohenstaufen,303 daughter of Philip II, of Swabia, King of Germany and Irene Angelina, before 22 Aug 1215. Marie was born on 3 Apr 1201 in Arezzo, Tuscany, Italy and died on 29 Mar 1235 in Leuven, Brabant, Flanders, Belgium at age 33. Other names for Marie were Marie of Swabia and Mary of Hohenstaufen.

Death Notes: Wikipedia has d. 29 March 1235. Ancestral Roots has d. abt 1240.

Research Notes: First wife of Henry II.

From Wikipedia - Marie of Hohenstaufen :

Marie of Hohenstaufen, Duchess of Brabant (3 April 1201 - 29 March 1235 ) was a member of the powerful Hohenstaufen dynasty. She is also known as Maria of Swabia. She was the third daughter of Philip of Swabia and Irene Angelina of Byzantium . Her husband was Henry II, Duke of Brabant .


Family
Marie of Hohenstaufen was born in Arezzo ,Tuscany , Italy on 3 April 1201. Her paternal grandparents were Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor and Beatrice I, Countess of Burgundy . Her maternal grandparents were Byzantine Emperor Isaac II Angelos and his first wife Herina Tornikaina[1].
Emperor Frederick II was her first cousin.
In 1208, at the age of seven, Marie was left an orphan by the unexpected deaths of her parents. On 21 June , her father was murdered by Otto of Wittelsbach , and two months later her mother died after giving birth to a daughter, who did not live beyond early infancy. Marie had three surviving sisters.


Siblings
Beatrice of Hohenstaufen (1198-1212, married Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor . The marriage was childless.
Cunigunde of Hohenstaufen (1200-1248), married in 1228 King Wenceslaus I of Bohemia , by whom she had issue.
Elizabeth of Hohenstaufen (1203- 5 November 1235), married in 1219 King Ferdinand III of Castile , by whom she had issue, including King Alfonso X of Castile . She was his first wife. Ferdinand married his second wife Jeanne de Dammartin, Countess of Ponthieu before August 1237, by whom he had issue, including Eleanor of Castile , Queen consort of King Edward I of England .


Marriage and children
Sometime before 22 August 1215 , she married Henry II, Duke of Brabant in Brabant (present-day Belgium ). Marie was his first wife. They had six children, and through them, Marie is the ancestress of every royal house in Europe :
Matilda of Brabant (1224 - 29 September 1288 ), married firstly, Robert I of Artois , by whom she had two children, Robert II of Artois and Blanche of Artois ; she married secondly Guy III, Count of Saint-Pol , by whom she had six children.
Beatrix of Brabant (1225 - 11 November 1288 ), married firstly Henry Raspe, Landgrave of Thuringia , and secondly William III of Dampierre . She died childless.
Marie of Brabant (c. 1226 - 18 January 1256 ), married Louis II, Duke of Bavaria . She was beheaded by her husband on suspicion of infidelity.
Margaret of Brabant (d. 14 March 1277 ), Abbess of Herzogenthal.
Henry III, Duke of Brabant (c. 1230 - 28 February 1261 ), married Adelaide of Burgundy (c. 1233- 23 October 1273 , daughter of Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy , by whom he had issue, including Henry IV, Duke of Brabant , John I, Duke of Brabant , and Maria of Brabant , Queen consort of King Philip III of France .
Philip of Brabant, died young.

Death
Marie of Hohenstaufen died on 29 March 1235 in Leuven , Brabant, five days before her thirty-fourth birthday.
In 1240, Henry married his second wife, Sophie of Thuringia , the daughter of Ludwig IV of Thuringia and Elisabeth of Hungary . They had two children: Henry I, Landgrave of Hesse and Elizabeth of Brabant, who married Albert I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg .



The child from this marriage was:

+ 317 F    i. Matilda, of Brabant 360 was born in 1224 and died on 29 Sep 1288 at age 64.

245. Yolanda de Courtenay 286 (Yolanda, of Flanders184, Margaret I, of Flanders135, Thierry I, of Lorraine, Count of Flanders94, Gertrude, of Flanders54, Robert I, Count of Flanders29, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1200 and died in 1233 about age 33.

Research Notes: Second wife of King Andrew II of Hungary


From Wikipedia - Yolanda de Courtenay :

Yolanda de Courtenay (c. 1200-1233), Queen Consort of Hungary [1] was the second wife of King Andrew II of Hungary .

Yolanda was the daughter of Count Peter II of Courtenay and his second wife, Yolanda of Flanders , the sister of Baldwin I and Henry I , the Emperors of Constantinople . Her marriage with King Andrew II, whose first wife, Gertrude had been murdered by conspirators on 24 September 1213 , was arranged by her uncle, the Emperor Henry I.

Their marriage was celebrated in February 1215 in Székesfehérvár and Archbishop John of Esztergom crowned her queen consort. However, Bishop Robert of Veszprém sent a complaint to Pope Innocent III , because the coronation of the queens consort in Hungary had been traditionally the privilege of his see . The Pope sent a legate to Hungary in order to investigate the complaint and confirmed the privilege of the See of Veszprém .

Following her uncle's death on 11 July 1216 , her husband was planning to acquire the imperial crown for himself, but the barons of the Latin Empire proclaimed her father emperor, instead.

Yolanda maintained good relations with his husband's children from his first marriage. Her husband survived her. She was buried in the White Monks ' Abbey in Egres .

Marriages and children
February 1215: Andrew II of Hungary (c. 1177 - 21 September 1235)
Yolanda (c. 1215 - 12 October 1251), wife of King James I of Aragon

Yolanda married Andrew II, of Hungary 361 in Feb 1215 in Székesfehérvár, Hungary. Andrew was born about 1177 and died on 21 Sep 1235 about age 58. Another name for Andrew was Andrew II "the Jerosolimitan" of Hungary.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Andrew II of Hungary :

Andrew II the Jerosolimitan (Hungarian : Jeruzsálemi II András/Endre, Croatian : Andrija II. Arpadovic Slovak : Ondrej) (c. 1177 - 21 September, 1235), King of Hungary [1](1205-1235). He was the younger son of King Béla III of Hungary , who invested him with the government of the Principality of Halych . However, the boyars of Halych rebelled against his rule and expelled the Hungarian troops. Following their father's death, Andrew continuously conspired against his brother, King Emeric of Hungary who had to grant him the government of Croatia and Dalmatia . When his brother and his infant son died, Andrew ascended the throne and started to grant royal domains to his partisans. He participated in the Fifth Crusade but he could not achieve any major military success. He was obliged to issue the Golden Bull confirming the privileges of the noblemen of Hungary and later he was also obliged to confirm the special privileges of the clergy. During his long reign, he had several quarrels with his sons.

The turbulent duke
Andrew was the second son of King Béla III and his first wife, Agnes of Antioch . As younger son, Andrew had no hope to inherite the Kingdom of Hungary from his father who wanted to ensure the inheritance of his elder son, Emeric and had him crowned already in 1182.

Nevertheless, when Prince Volodymyr II of Halych , who had been expelled from his country by his subjects, fled to Hungary seeking for assistance in 1188, King Béla III had him arrested and occupied his principality and he invested Andrew with Halych . The child Andrew's rule in Halych must have been only nominal; he even did not visit his principality. Although, the young prince's troops could get the mastery in 1189 when the boyars of Halych rose against his rule, but shortly afterwards Prince Volodymyr II managed to escape from his captivity and he expelled the Hungarian troops from Halych.

On 23 April 1196, King Béla III died and he left the Kingdom of Hungary unportioned to his eldest son, Emeric, while Andrew inherited a large amount of money in order to fulfill his father's Crusader oath. However, Andrew used the money to recruit followers among the barons and also sought the assistance of Leopold V, Duke of Austria . In December 1197, Andrew's troops defeated King Emeric's armies in a battle near to Macsek in December 1197. Following Andrew's victory, the king was obliged to transfer the government of the Duchies of Croatia and Dalmatia to Andrew.

In the beginning of 1198, Pope Innocent III requested Andrew to fulfill his father's last will and lead a Crusade to the Holy Land . However, instead of a Crusade, Andrew made a campaign against the neighbouring provinces and occupied Zahumlje and Rama . Andrew also went on conspiring with some prelates against his brother, but King Emeric was informed on Andrew's plans and he personally arrested Bishop Boleszlo of Vác , one of Andrew's main supporters, and he also deprived his brother's followers (e.g., Palatine Mog ) of their dignities. In the summer of 1199, King Emeric defeated Andrew in the Battle of Rád and Andrew had to fleed to Austria. Finally, the two brothers made peace with the mediation of the Papal Legate Gregory, and the king granted again the government of Croatia and Dalmatia to his brother.

Around 1200, Andrew married Gertrude , a daughter of Berthold IV, Duke of Merania . It was probably his wife who persuaded him to conspire against his brother again, but when King Emeric, who had realised that Andrew's troops outnumbered his armies, went unarmed, wearing only the crown and the sceptre , to Andrew's camp near Varasd , Andrew surrendered voluntarily on the spur of the scene. The king had his brother arrested, but Andrew managed to escape shortly afterwards.

Nevertheless, the king become more and more ill, and wanted to secure the ascension of his young son, Ladislaus , who had been crowned on 26 August 1204. Shortly afterwards, the king reconciled with Andrew whom he appointed to govern the kingdom during his son's minority. After his brother's death on 30 September/November 1204, Andrew took over the government of the kingdom as his nephew's tutor and he also seized the money his brother had deposited on behalf of the child Ladislaus. The Dowager Queen Constance was anxious about her son's life and she escaped with King Ladislaus to the court of Leopold VI, Duke of Austria . Andrew made preparations for a war against Austria , but the child king died on 7 May 1205, thus Andrew inherited the throne.

Novæ institutiones
Andrew was crowned by Archbishop John of Kalocsa on 29 May 1205 in Székesfehérvár , but before the coronation, he had to take an oath. Andrew made a radical alteration in the internal policy followed by his predecessors and he began to bestow the royal estates to his partisans. He called this new policy novæ institutiones in his deeds, and he declared that "Nothing can set bounds to generosity of the Royal Majesty, and the best measure of grants, for a monarch, is immeasurableness". He gave away everything - money, villages, domains, whole counties - to the utter impoverishment of the treasury. Andrew was generous primarily with his wife's German relatives and followers, which caused discontent among his subjects.

His last years
On 14 May 1234, Andrew, who had lost his second wife in the previous year, married Beatrice D'Este who was thirty years younger than himself. Because of the new marriage, his relationship enworthened with his sons.

In the summer of 1234, the Bishop John of Bosnia excommunicated Andrew because he had not respected some provisions of the Agreement of Bereg. Andrew appealed to the Pope against the bishop's measure. In the autumn of 1234, Prince Danylo laid siege to the capital of Andrew's youngest son who died during the siege. Thus, the Hungarian supremacy over Halych disappeared.

In the beginning of 1235, Andrew made a campaign against Austria and enforced Duke Frederick II to make a peace.

He was still alive when one of his daughters, Elisabeth , who had died some years before, was canonized on 28 May 1235. Before his death, he was absolved from the excommunication; moreover, the Pope also promised that the King of Hungary and his relatives would not be excommunicated without the special permission of the Pope.

Marriages and children
#1. around 1200: Gertrude of Merania (1185 - 8 September 1213), a daughter of Berthold IV, Duke of Merania and his wife, Agnes of Wettin
Anna Maria of Hungary (c. 1204 - 1237), wife of Tzar Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria
King Béla IV of Hungary (1206 - 3 May 1270)
Saint Elisabeth of Hungary (1207 - 10 November 1231), wife of Landgraf Louis IV of Thuringia
King Coloman of Halych (1208 - after 11 April 1241)
Prince Andrew II of Halych (c. 1210 - 1234)
#2. February 1215: Yolanda de Courtenay (c. 1200 - 1233), daughter of Peter I , Emperor of the Latin Empire and his second wife, Yolanda I , Empress of the Latin Empire
Violant of Hungary or Yolanda (c. 1215 - 12 October 1251), wife of King James I of Aragon
#3. 14 May 1234: Beatrice D'Este (c. 1215 - before 8 May 1245), daughter of Aldobrandino I D'Este and his wife
Stephen (1236 - 10 April 1271)

Noted events in his life were:

• King of Hungary: 1205-1235.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 318 F    i. Violant, of Hungary 362 was born about 1216, died in 1253 about age 37, and was buried in Monastery of Santa Maria de Vallbona, Lleida, Catalonia.

246. Helvis de Dampierre 288 (Guy I, Vicomte de Troyes185, Isabel de Montlhéry, Viscomtessa de Troyes137, Lithuaise96, Adela, of Normandy55, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died after 1295. Another name for Helvis was Helvide de Dampierre.

Helvis married Geoffroi IV de Joinville, Sénéchal of Champagne,232 son of Geoffroi III de Joinville, Sénéchal of Champagne and of Bar-sur-Seine and Félicité de Brienne,. Geoffroi died in Aug 1190 in Acre, Palestine.

Death Notes: Died in battle

(Duplicate Line. See Person 199)

247. Blanche, of Castile 289 (Eleanor, of England186, Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England138, Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 4 Mar 1188 in Palencia, (Palencia, Castile-Léon), Spain and died on 26 Nov 1252 in Paris, (Île-de-France), France at age 64. Another name for Blanche was Blanca de Castilla.

Death Notes: Ancestral Roots 113-28 has d. 27 Nov. 1252

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Blanche of Castile :

Blanche of Castile (Blanca de Castilla in Spanish ; 4 March 1188 - 26 November 1252), wife of Louis VIII of France . She was born in Palencia , Spain , the third daughter of Alfonso VIII , king of Castile , and of Eleanor of England . Eleanor was a daughter of Henry II of England and his Queen consort Eleanor of Aquitaine .

Biography
In consequence of a treaty between Philip Augustus and John of England , Blanche's sister Urraca was betrothed to the former's son, Louis. Their grandmother Eleanor, upon getting acquainted with the two sisters, judged that Blanche's personality was more fit for a queen of France. In the spring of 1200 she brought her to France instead. On 22 May 1200 the treaty was finally signed, John ceding with his niece the fiefs of Issoudun and Gracay , together with those that André de Chauvigny , lord of Châteauroux, held in Berry , of the English crown. The marriage was celebrated the next day, at Portmort on the right bank of the Seine , in John's domains, as those of Philip lay under an interdict.
Blanche first displayed her great qualities in 1216, when Louis, who on the death of John claimed the English crown in her right, invaded England, only to find a united nation against him. Philip Augustus refused to help his son, and Blanche was his sole support. The queen established herself at Calais and organized two fleets, one of which was commanded by Eustace the Monk , and an army under Robert of Courtenay ; but all her resolution and energy were in vain. Although it would seem that her masterful temper exercised a sensible influence upon her husband's gentler character, her role during his reign (1223-1226) is not well known.
Upon his death he left Blanche regent and guardian of his children. Of her twelve or thirteen children, six had died, and Louis, the heir - afterwards the sainted Louis IX - was but twelve years old.
The situation was critical, for the hard-won domains of the house of Capet seemed likely to fall to pieces during a minority. Blanche had to bear the whole burden of affairs alone, to break up a league of the barons (1226), and to repel the attack of the king of England (1230). But her energy and firmness overcame all dangers.
There was an end to the calumnies circulated against her, based on the poetical homage rendered her by Count Theobald IV of Champagne , a.k.a. KingTheobald I of Navarre since 1234, and the prolonged stay in Paris of the papal legate, Romano Bonaventura , cardinal of Sant' Angelo. The nobles were awed by her warlike preparations or won over by adroit diplomacy, and their league was broken up. St Louis owed his realm to his mother, but he himself always remained somewhat under the spell of her imperious personality.
After he came of age, in 1234, aged 20, her influence upon him may still be traced. The same year, he was married, and Blanche became Queen mother . Louis IX married Marguerite of Provence, who was the eldest of four daughters of Ramon, count of Provence, and Beatrice of Savoy. In 1248 Blanche again became Queen regent, during Louis IX's absence on the crusade, a project which she had strongly opposed. In the disasters which followed she maintained peace, while draining the land of men and money to aid her son in the East. At last her strength failed her. She fell ill into a bale of hay at Melun in November 1252, and was taken to Paris , but lived only a few days. She was buried at Maubuisson .

[edit ] Issue
Blanche (1205-1206).
Agnes (b. and d. 1207).
Philippe (9 September 1209 - July 1218), married (or only betrothed) in 1217 to Agnes of Donzy.
Alphonse (b. and d. Lorrez-le-Bocage, 23 January 1213).
John (b. and d. Lorrez-le-Bocage, 23 January 1213), twin of Alphonse.
Louis IX (Poissy, 25 April 1214 - 25 August 1270, Tunis), King of France as successor to his father.
Robert (25 September 1216 - 9 February 1250, killed in battle, Manssurah, Egypt)
Philippe (2 January 1218-1220).
John Tristan (21 July 1219-1232), Count of Anjou and Maine.
Alphonse (Poissy, 11 November 1220 - 21 August 1271, Corneto), Count of Poitou and Auvergne, and by marriage, of Toulouse.
Philippe Dagobert (20 February 1222-1232).
Isabel (14 April 1225 - 23 February 1269).
Charles Etienne (21 March 1226 - 7 January 1285), Count of Anjou and Maine, by marriage Count of Provence and Folcalquier, and King of Sicily.

Blanche married Louis VIII, King of France 363 on 23 May 1200. Louis was born on 3 Sep 1187 and died on 8 Nov 1226 in Montpensier, Auvergne, (France) at age 39. Another name for Louis was Louis VIII "the Lion" King of France.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Louis VIII of France :

Louis VIII the Lion (5 September 1187 - 8 November 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. He was a member of the House of Capet . Louis VIII was born in Paris , France , the son of Philip II Augustus and Isabelle of Hainaut . He was also Count of Artois from 1190, inheriting the county from his mother.

As Prince Louis
On 23 May 1200, at the age of 12, Louis was married to Blanche of Castile , following prolonged negotiations between Philip Augustus and Blanche's uncle John of England (as represented in William Shakespeare 's historical play King John ).

In 1216, the English barons rebelled in the First Barons' War against the unpopular King John of England (1199-1216) and offered the throne to Prince Louis. Louis and an army landed in England; he was proclaimed King in London in May 1216, although he was not crowned. There was little resistance when the prince entered London. At St Paul's Cathedral , Louis was accepted as ruler with great pomp and celebration in the presence of all of London. Many nobles, as well as King Alexander II of Scotland (1214-49), gathered to give homage. On 14 June 1216, Louis captured Winchester and soon controlled over half of the English kingdom.[1]

After a year and a half of war, King John's death, and his replacement by a regency on behalf of the boy king Henry III (John's son), many of the rebellious barons deserted Louis. When his army was beaten at Lincoln , and his naval forces (led by Eustace the Monk ) were defeated off the coast of Sandwich , he was forced to make peace under English terms.

The principal provisions of the Treaty of Lambeth were an amnesty for English rebels, land possession to return to the status quo ante, the Channel Islands to be returned to the English crown, Louis to undertake not to attack England again, and to attempt to give Normandy back to the English crown, and 10,000 marks to be given to Louis. The effect of the treaty was that Louis agreed he had never been the legitimate king of England.

As King Louis VIII
Louis VIII succeeded his father on 14 July 1223; his coronation took place on 6 August of the same year in the cathedral at Reims . As King, he continued to seek revenge on the Angevins and seized Poitou and Saintonge from them in 1229. There followed the seizure of Avignon and Languedoc .

On 1 November 1223, he issued an ordinance that prohibited his officials from recording debts owed to Jews, thus reversing the policies set by his father Philip II Augustus. Usury (lending money with interest) was illegal for Christians to practice, according to Church law it was seen as a vice in which people profited from others' misfortune (like gambling), and was punishable by excommunication , a severe punishment. However since Jews were not Christian, they could not be excommunicated, and thus fell in to a legal gray area which secular rulers would sometimes exploit by allowing (or requesting) Jews to provide usury services, often for personal gain to the secular ruler, and to the discontent of the Church. Louis VIII's prohibition was one attempt at resolving this legal problem which was a constant source of friction in Church and State courts.

Twenty-six barons accepted, but Theobald IV (1201-53), the powerful Count of Champagne , did not, since he had an agreement with the Jews that guaranteed him extra income through taxation. Theobald IV would become a major opposition force to Capetian dominance, and his hostility was manifest during the reign of Louis VIII. For example, during the siege of Avignon, he performed only the minimum service of 40 days, and left home amid charges of treachery.

In 1225, the council of Bourges excommunicated the Count of Toulouse , Raymond VII , and declared a crusade against the southern barons. Louis happily renewed the conflict in order to enforce his royal rights. Roger Bernard the Great , count of Foix , tried to keep the peace, but the king rejected his embassy and the counts of Foix and Toulouse took up arms against him. The king was largely successful, but he did not complete the work before his death.

While returning to Paris, King Louis VIII became ill with dysentery , and died on 8 November 1226 in the chateau at Montpensier , Auvergne .
The Saint Denis Basilica houses the tomb of Louis VIII. His son, Louis IX (1226-70), succeeded him on the throne.

Ancestry

Marriage and Issue
On 23 May 1200, at the age of twelve, Louis married Blanche of Castile (4 March 1188 - 26 November 1252).
Blanche (1205-1206).
Agnes (b. and d. 1207).
Philippe (9 September 1209 - July 1218), married (or only betrothed) in 1217 to Agnes of Donzy.
Alphonse (b. and d. Lorrez-le-Bocage, 23 January 1213).
John (b. and d. Lorrez-le-Bocage, 23 January 1213), twin of Alphonse.
Louis IX (Poissy, 25 April 1214 - 25 August 1270, Tunis), King of France as successor to his father.
Robert (25 September 1216 - 9 February 1250, killed in Battle of Al Mansurah , Egypt)
Philippe (2 January 1218-1220).
John Tristan (21 July 1219-1232), Count of Anjou and Maine.
Alphonse (Poissy, 11 November 1220 - 21 August 1271, Corneto), Count of Poitou and Auvergne, and by marriage, of Toulouse.
Philippe Dagobert (20 February 1222-1232).
Isabel (14 April 1225 - 23 February 1269).
Charles Etienne (21 March 1226 - 7 January 1285), Count of Anjou and Maine, by marriage Count of Provence and Folcalquier, and King of Sicily.

Noted events in his life were:

• King of France: 1223-1226.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 319 M    i. Robert I "the Good", Count of Artois 364 was born in 1216 and died on 8 Feb 1250 at age 34.


248. KingHenry III, of England 290 (King John "Lackland", of England187, Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England138, Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 1 Oct 1207 in Winchester Castle, Winchester, (Hampshire), England, died on 16 Nov 1272 in Westminster Palace, London, England at age 65, and was buried in Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Henry III of England :

Henry III (1 October 1207 - 16 November 1272 ) was the son and successor of John "Lackland" as King of England , reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. Mediaeval English monarchs did not use numbers after their names, and his contemporaries knew him as Henry of Winchester. He was the first child king in England since the reign of Ethelred the Unready . Despite his long reign, his personal accomplishments were slim and he was a political and military failure. England, however, prospered during his century and his greatest monument is Westminster , which he made the seat of his government and where he expanded the abbey as a shrine to Edward the Confessor .

He assumed the crown under the regency of the popular William Marshal , but the England he inherited had undergone several drastic changes in the reign of his father. He spent much of his reign fighting the barons over the Magna Carta [citation needed ] and the royal rights, and was eventually forced to call the first "parliament " in 1264. He was also unsuccessful on the Continent, where he endeavoured to re-establish English control over Normandy , Anjou , and Aquitaine .

Coronation
Henry III was born in 1207 at Winchester Castle . He was the son of King John and Isabella of Angoulême . After his father's death in 1216, Henry, who was nine at the time, was hastily crowned in Gloucester Cathedral ; he was the first child monarch since the Norman invasion of England in 1066. The coronation was a simple affair, attended by only a handful of noblemen and three bishops. None of his father's executors was present, and in the absence of a crown a simple golden band was placed on the young boy's head, not by the Archbishop of Canterbury (who was at this time supporting Prince Louis of France , the newly-proclaimed king of England) but rather by the Bishop of Gloucester . In 1220, a second coronation was ordered by Pope Honorius III who did not consider that the first had been carried out in accordance with church rites. This occurred on 17 May 1220 in Westminster Abbey .[1]

Under John's rule, the barons had supported an invasion by Prince Louis because they disliked the way that John had ruled the country. However, they quickly saw that the young prince was a safer option. Henry's regents immediately declared their intention to rule by Magna Carta , which they proceeded to do during Henry's minority. Magna Carta was reissued in 1217 as a sign of goodwill to the barons and the country was ruled by regents until 1227...

Death
Henry's reign ended when he died in 1272, after which he was succeeded by his son, Edward I . His body was laid, temporarily, in the tomb of Edward the Confessor while his own sarcophagus was constructed in Westminster Abbey ...


Marriage and children
Married on 14 January 1236 , Canterbury Cathedral , Canterbury , Kent , to Eleanor of Provence , with at least five children born:
Edward I (b. 17 January 1239 - d. 8 July 1307 )
Margaret (b. 29 September 1240 - d. 26 February 1275 ), married King Alexander III of Scotland
Beatrice (b. 25 June 1242 - d. 24 March 1275 ), married to John II, Duke of Brittany
Edmund (16 January 1245 - d. 5 June 1296 )
Katharine (b. 25 November 1253 - d. 3 May 1257 ), deafness was discovered at age 2. [1]

There is reason to doubt the existence of several attributed children of Henry and Eleanor.
Richard (b. after 1247 - d. before 1256 ),
John (b. after 1250 - d. before 1256 ), and
Henry (b. after 1253 - d. young)

Are known only from a 14th century addition made to a manuscript of Flores historiarum , and are nowhere contemporaneously recorded.
William (b. and d. ca. 1258 ) is an error for the nephew of Henry's half-brother, William de Valence .
Another daughter, Matilda, is found only in the Hayles abbey chronicle, alongside such other fictitious children as a son named William for King John , and a bastard son named John for King Edward I . Matilda's existence is doubtful, at best. For further details, see Margaret Howell, The Children of King Henry III and Eleanor of Provence (1992).

Personal details
His Royal Motto was qui non dat quod habet non accipit ille quod optat (He who does not give what he has, does not receive what he wants).
His favorite wine was made with the Loire Valley red wine grape Pineau d'Aunis which Henry first introduced to England in the thirteenth century. [2]
His favourite oath was "By the face of Lucca", referring to the Volto Santo di Lucca .
He built a Royal Palace in the town of Cippenham , Slough , Berkshire named "Cippenham Moat ".

In 1266, Henry III of England granted the Lübeck and Hamburg Hansa a charter for operations in England, which contributed to the emergence of the Hanseatic League .

Noted events in his life were:

• King of England: 1216-1272.

Henry married Eleanor, of Provence,365 daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence and Forcalquier and Beatrice, of Savoy, on 14 Jan 1237 in Canterbury, Kent, England. Eleanor was born about 1223 and died on 25 Jun 1291 in Amesbury, Wiltshire, England about age 68.

Marriage Notes: Ancestral Roots has m. 14 Jan 1237 and m. 14 Jan 1236

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 111-30.

From Wikipedia - Eleanor of Provence (different dates from above):

Eleanor of Provence (c. 1223 - 26 June 1291 ) was Queen Consort of King Henry III of England .

Born in Aix-en-Provence , she was the daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence (1198-1245) and Beatrice of Savoy (1206-1266), the daughter of Tomasso, Count of Savoy and his second wife Marguerite of Geneva . All four of their daughters became queens. Like her mother, grandmother, and sisters, Eleanor was renowned for her beauty.[citation needed ] Eleanor was probably born in 1223; Matthew Paris describes her as being "jamque duodennem" (already twelve) when she arrived in the Kingdom of England for her marriage.

Eleanor was married to Henry III, King of England (1207-1272) on January 14 , 1236 . She had never seen him prior to the wedding at Canterbury Cathedral and had never set foot in his impoverished kingdom.[citation needed ] Edmund Rich , Archbishop of Canterbury, officiated.

Eleanor and Henry had five children:
Edward I (1239-1307)
Margaret of England (1240-1275), married King Alexander III of Scotland
Beatrice of England (1242 - 1275), married John II, Duke of Brittany
Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster (1245-1296)
Katharine (25 November 1253 - 3 May 1257 )

Eleanor seems to have been especially devoted to her eldest son, Edward; when he was deathly ill in 1246, she stayed with him at the abbey at Beaulieu for three weeks, long past the time allowed by monastic rules.[citation needed ] It was because of her influence that King Henry granted the duchy of Gascony to Edward in 1249.[citation needed ] Her youngest child, Katharine, seems to have had a degenerative disease that rendered her deaf. When she died aged four, both her royal parents suffered overwhelming grief.[citation needed ]


She was a confident consort to Henry, but she brought in her retinue a large number of cousins, "the Savoyards," and her influence with the King and her unpopularity with the English barons created friction during Henry's reign.[citation needed ] Eleanor was devoted to her husband's cause, stoutly contested Simon de Montfort , raising troops in France for Henry's cause. On July 13 , 1263 , she was sailing down the Thames on a barge when her barge was attacked by citizens of London. In fear for her life, Eleanor was rescued by Thomas FitzThomas , the mayor of London, and took refuge at the bishop of London's home.

In 1272 Henry died, and her son Edward, 33 years old, became Edward I, King of England . She stayed on in England as Dowager Queen , and raised several of her grandchildren -- Edward's son Henry and daughter Eleanor, and Beatrice's son John . When her grandson Henry died in her care in 1274, Eleanor mourned him and his heart was buried at the priory at Guildford she founded in his memory. Eleanor retired to a convent but remained in touch with her son and her sister, Marguerite.
Eleanor died in 1291 in Amesbury , England .

References
Margaret Howell, Eleanor of Provence: Queenship in Thirteenth-century England, 1997


Children from this marriage were:

+ 320 M    i. KingEdward I, of England 366 was born on 17 Jun 1239 in Westminster Palace, London, England, died on 7 Jul 1307 in Burgh-by-Sands, Cumberland, England at age 68, and was buried in Westminster Abbey, London, Midlesex, England.

+ 321 F    ii. Margaret, of England 367 was born on 29 Sep 1240 in Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England, died on 26 Feb 1275 in Cupar Castle at age 34, and was buried in Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, Scotland.

+ 322 F    iii. Beatrice, of England 368 was born on 25 Jun 1242 in Bordeaux, France and died on 24 Mar 1275 in London, Middlesex, England at age 32.

+ 323 M    iv. Edmund "Crouchback", 1st Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester 369 was born on 16 Jan 1245 in London, England, died on 5 Jun 1296 in Bayonne, France at age 51, and was buried on 15 Jul 1296 in Westminster Abbey, London, Midlesex, England.

+ 324 F    v. Katharine was born in 1253 and died in 1257 at age 4.

249. Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, King of the Romans (King John "Lackland", of England187, Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England138, Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 5 Jan 1209 and died on 2 Apr 1272 at age 63.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 258-27

Source also: Wikipedia - John of England

Richard had a relationship with Joan de Valletort. This couple did not marry.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 258-27 (Richard)

250. Joan, Queen Consort of Scotland 291 (King John "Lackland", of England187, Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England138, Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1210 and died in 1238 at age 28.

Research Notes: Queen Consort of Alexander II of Scotland
Source: Wikipedia - John of England

251. Isabella (King John "Lackland", of England187, Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England138, Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1214 and died in 1241 at age 27.

Research Notes: Source: Wikipedia - John of England

252. Eleanor (King John "Lackland", of England187, Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England138, Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1215 and died on 13 Apr 1275 at age 60. Other names for Eleanor were Eleanor Plantagenet and Elinor Plantagenet.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 260-30

Source also: Wikipedia - John of England

Eleanor married William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke on 23 Apr 1224. William died on 15 Apr 1231.

Research Notes: d.s.p.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 260-30 (Eleanor)

Eleanor next married Simon, de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, son of Simon IV de Montfort l'Aumary and Unknown, 7 Jan 1238 or 1239. Simon was born about 1208 in Normandy, France and died on 4 Aug 1265 in Evesham, Worcestershire, England about age 57. Another name for Simon was Simon III de Montfort Earl of Leicester.

Research Notes: Second husband of Eleanor.

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pennsylvania by Charles H. Browning, Philadelphia, 1912.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 260-30 (Eleanor)


The child from this marriage was:

+ 325 F    i. Elinor de Montfort was born about 1252 and died in 1282 about age 30.

253. Joan, Princess of Gwynedd 292 (King John "Lackland", of England187, Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England138, Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born before 1200 and died between 30 Mar 1236 and Feb 1237. Other names for Joan were Joan Princess of North Wales, Joanna Lady of Wales, Siwan, and Joan Plantagenet Princess of Gwynedd.

Research Notes: Natural daughter of John, king of England. John had another, legitimate, daughter named Joan, who was Queen Consort of Alexander II of Scotland.
-----
From Ancestral Roots, Line 29A-27:
"JOAN, (nat. dau. by unknown mistress [of John "Lackland"]), Princess of North Wales, b. well bef. 1200, d. 30 Mar. 1236 or Feb. 1237..."
-----------
Source - Wikipedia - John of England and Llywelyn the Great.

From Wikipedia - Llywelyn the Great:

"During Llywelyn's boyhood Gwynedd was ruled by two of his uncles, who had agreed to split the kingdom between them following the death of Llywelyn's grandfather, Owain Gwynedd , in 1170. Llywelyn had a strong claim to be the legitimate ruler and began a campaign to win power at an early age. He was sole ruler of Gwynedd by 1200, and made a treaty with King John of England the same year. Llywelyn's relations with John remained good for the next ten years. He married John's illegitimate daughter Joan , also known as Joanna, in 1205, and when John arrested Gwenwynwyn ab Owain of Powys in 1208 Llywelyn took the opportunity to annex southern Powys. In 1210 relations deteriorated and John invaded Gwynedd in 1211. Llywelyn was forced to seek terms and to give up all his lands east of the River Conwy, but was able to recover these lands the following year in alliance with the other Welsh princes. He allied himself with the barons who forced John to sign Magna Carta in 1215. By 1216 he was the dominant power in Wales, holding a council at Aberdyfi that year to apportion lands to the other princes...

Children
The identity of the mother of some of Llywelyn's children is uncertain. He was survived by nine children, two legitimate, one probably legitimate and six illegitimate. Elen ferch Llywelyn (c.1207-1253), his only certainly legitimate daughter, first married John de Scotia, Earl of Chester. This marriage was childless, and after John's death Elen married Sir Robert de Quincy , the brother of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester . Llywelyn's only legitimate son, Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c.1208-1246), married Isabella de Braose, daughter of William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny , Lord of Abergavenny. William was the son of Reginald de Braose , who married another of Llywelyn's daughters. Dafydd and Isabella may have had one child together, Helen of Wales (1246-1295), but the marriage failed to produce a male heir.

Another daughter, Gwladus Ddu (c.1206-1251), was probably legitimate. Adam of Usk states that she was a legitimate daughter by Joan, although some sources claim that her mother was Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch.[64] She first married Reginald de Braose of Brecon and Abergavenny, but had no children by him. After Reginald's death she married Ralph de Mortimer of Wigmore and had several sons.

The mother of most of Llywelyn's illegitimate children is known or assumed to have been Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch (c.1168-1198). Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (c.1196-1244) was Llywelyn's eldest son and is known to be the son of Tangwystl. He married Senena, daughter of Caradoc ap Thomas of Anglesey . Their four sons included Llywelyn ap Gruffydd , who for a period occupied a position in Wales comparable to that of his grandfather, and Dafydd ap Gruffydd who ruled Gwynedd briefly after his brother's death. Llywelyn had another son, Tegwared ap Llywelyn, by a woman known only as Crysten.

Marared ferch Llywelyn (c.1198-after 1263) married John de Braose of Gower, a nephew of Reginald de Braose, and after his death married Walter Clifford of Bronllys and Clifford. Other illegitimate daughters were Gwenllian ferch Llywelyn, who married William de Lacey, and Angharad ferch Llywelyn, who married Maelgwn Fychan. Susanna ferch Llywelyn was sent to England as a hostage in 1228, but no further details are known."



Joan married Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Gwynedd, son of Iorwerth Drwyndwn ap Owain Gwynedd, Prince of North Wales and Marared ferch Madog ap Maredudd, in 1205. Llywelyn was born about 1173 in <Dolwyddelan>, Wales, died on 11 Apr 1240 in Cistercian Abbey of Aberconwy, Wales about age 67, and was buried in Llanrwst Parish Church, Wales. Other names for Llywelyn were Llewellyn the Great Prince of Gwynedd, Llywelyn Fawr Prince of Gwynedd, Llywelyn I of Wales, and Llywelyn ap Iorwerth.

Marriage Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 29A-27 has m. 1206. Wikipedia has m. 1205.

Research Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 176B-27. "He had a number of mistresses, one of whom, Tangwystl, was the mother of [28. Gladys Dhu.]"

Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, p.80

From Wikipedia - Llywelyn the Great :

Llywelyn the Great (Welsh Llywelyn Fawr...), full name Llywelyn ab Iorwerth, (c. 1173 - April 11 , 1240 ) was a Prince of Gwynedd in North Wales and eventually de facto ruler over most of Wales. He is occasionally called Llywelyn I of Wales.[1] By a combination of war and diplomacy he dominated Wales for forty years, and was one of only two Welsh rulers to be called 'the Great'. Llywelyn's main home and court throughout his reign was at Garth Celyn on the north coast of Gwynedd, between Bangor and Conwy, overlooking the port of Llanfaes. Throughout the thirteenth century, up to the Edwardian conquest, Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn , was in effect the capital of Wales. (Garth Celyn is now known as Pen y Bryn , Bryn Llywelyn, Abergwyngregyn and parts of the medieval buildings still remain).

During Llywelyn's boyhood Gwynedd was ruled by two of his uncles, who had agreed to split the kingdom between them following the death of Llywelyn's grandfather, Owain Gwynedd , in 1170. Llywelyn had a strong claim to be the legitimate ruler and began a campaign to win power at an early age. He was sole ruler of Gwynedd by 1200, and made a treaty with King John of England the same year. Llywelyn's relations with John remained good for the next ten years. He married John's illegitimate daughter Joan , also known as Joanna, in 1205, and when John arrested Gwenwynwyn ab Owain of Powys in 1208 Llywelyn took the opportunity to annex southern Powys. In 1210 relations deteriorated and John invaded Gwynedd in 1211. Llywelyn was forced to seek terms and to give up all his lands east of the River Conwy, but was able to recover these lands the following year in alliance with the other Welsh princes. He allied himself with the barons who forced John to sign Magna Carta in 1215. By 1216 he was the dominant power in Wales, holding a council at Aberdyfi that year to apportion lands to the other princes.

Following King John's death, Llywelyn concluded the Treaty of Worcester with his successor Henry III in 1218. During the next fifteen years Llywelyn was frequently involved in fighting with Marcher lords and sometimes with the king, but also made alliances with several of the major powers in the Marches. The Peace of Middle in 1234 marked the end of Llywelyn's military career as the agreed truce of two years was extended year by year for the remainder of his reign. He maintained his position in Wales until his death in 1240, and was succeeded by his son Dafydd ap Llywelyn .

Genealogy and early life
Llywelyn was born about 1173, the son of Iorwerth ap Owain and the grandson of Owain Gwynedd , who had been ruler of Gwynedd until his death in 1170. Llywelyn was a descendant of the senior line of Rhodri Mawr and therefore a member of the princely house of Aberffraw.[2] He was probably born at Dolwyddelan though he could not have been born in the present Dolwyddelan castle, which was built by Llywelyn himself. He may have been born in the old castle which occupied a rocky knoll on the valley floor.[3] Little is known about his father, Iorwerth Drwyndwn, who may have died when Llywelyn was an infant. There is no record of Iorwerth having taken part in the power struggle between some of Owain Gwynedd's other sons following Owain's death, although he was the eldest surviving son. There is a tradition that he was disabled or disfigured in some way that excluded him from power.[4]

By 1175 Gwynedd had been divided between two of Llywelyn's uncles. Dafydd ab Owain held the area east of the River Conwy and Rhodri ab Owain held the west. Dafydd and Rhodri were the sons of Owain by his second marriage to Cristin ferch Goronwy. This marriage was not considered valid by the church as Cristin was Owain's first cousin, a degree of relationship which according to Canon law prohibited marriage. Giraldus Cambrensis refers to Iorwerth Drwyndwn as the only legitimate son of Owain Gwynedd.[5] Following Iorwerth's death, Llywelyn was, at least in the eyes of the church, the legitimate claimant to the throne of Gwynedd.[6]
Llywelyn's mother was Marared, sometimes anglicized to Margaret, daughter of Madog ap Maredudd , prince of Powys . There is evidence that after Iorwerth's death Marared married into the Corbet family of Caux in Shropshire , and Llywelyn may have spent part of his boyhood there.[7]...

Marital problems 1230
Following his capture, William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny decided to ally himself to Llywelyn, and a marriage was arranged between his daughter Isabella and Llywelyn's heir, Dafydd ap Llywelyn. At Easter 1230 William visited Llywelyn's court Garth Celyn , Aber Garth Celyn now known as Pen y Bryn , Abergwyngregyn . During this visit he was found in Llywelyn's chamber together with Llywelyn's wife Joan. On 2 May , De Braose was hanged in the marshland under Garth Celyn , the place now remembered as Gwern y Grog, Hanging Marsh, a deliberately humiliating execution for a nobleman, and Joan was placed under house arrest for a year. The Brut y Tywysogion chronicler commented:

" ... that year William de Breos the Younger, lord of Brycheiniog, was hanged by the lord Llywelyn in Gwynedd, after he had been caught in Llywelyn's chamber with the king of England's daughter, Llywelyn's wife.[42] " A letter from Llywelyn to William's wife, Eva de Braose, written shortly after the execution enquires whether she still wishes the marriage between Dafydd and Isabella to take place.[43] The marriage did go ahead, and the following year Joan was forgiven and restored to her position as princess.

Until 1230 Llywelyn had used the title princeps Norwalliæ 'Prince of North Wales', but from that year he changed his title to 'Prince of Aberffraw and Lord of Snowdon', possibly to underline his supremacy over the other Welsh princes.[44] He did not formally style himself 'Prince of Wales ' although as J.E. Lloyd comments "he had much of the power which such a title might imply".[45]...

Arrangements for the succession
In his later years Llywelyn devoted much effort to ensuring that his only legitimate son Dafydd would follow him as ruler of Gwynedd. Dafydd's older but illegitimate brother, Gruffydd , was excluded from the succession. This was a departure from Welsh custom, not as is often stated because the kingdom was not divided between Dafydd and Gruffydd but because Gruffydd was excluded from consideration as a potential heir owing to his illegitimacy. This was contrary to Welsh law which stipulated that illegitimate sons had equal rights with legitimate sons, provided they had been acknowledged by the father.[50]

In 1220 Llywelyn induced the minority government of King Henry to acknowledge Dafydd as his heir.[51] In 1222 he petitioned Pope Honorius III to have Dafydd's succession confirmed. The original petition has not been preserved but the Pope's reply refers to the "destestable custom ... in his land whereby the son of the handmaiden was equally heir with the son of the free woman and illegitimate sons obtained an inheritance as if they were legitimate". The Pope welcomed the fact that Llywelyn was abolishing this custom.[52] In 1226 Llywelyn persuaded the Pope to declare his wife Joan, Dafydd's mother, to be a legitimate daughter of King John, again in order to strengthen Dafydd's position, and in 1229 the English crown accepted Dafydd's homage for the lands he would inherit from his father.[53] In 1238 Llywelyn held a council at Strata Florida Abbey where the other Welsh princes swore fealty to Dafydd.[54] Llywelyn's original intention had been that they should do homage to Dafydd, but the king wrote to the other rulers forbidding them to do homage.[55]

Gruffydd was given an appanage in Meirionnydd and Ardudwy but his rule was said to be oppressive, and in 1221 Llywelyn stripped him of these territories.[56] In 1228 Llywelyn imprisoned him, and he was not released until 1234. On his release he was given part of Ll to rule. His performance this time was apparently more satisfactory and by 1238 he had been given the remainder of Ll and a substantial part of Powys.[57]

Death and the transfer of power
Joan died in 1237 and Llywelyn appears to have suffered a paralytic stroke the same year.[58] From this time on, his heir Dafydd took an increasing part in the rule of the principality. Dafydd deprived his brother Gruffydd of the lands given him by Llywelyn, and later seized him and his eldest son Owain and held them in Criccieth Castle . In 1240 the chronicler of Brut y Tywysogion records:

" ... the lord Llywelyn ap Iorwerth son of Owain Gwynedd, Prince of Wales, a second Achilles , died having taken on the habit of religion at Aberconwy, and was buried honourably.[59] "

Llywelyn died at the Cistercian abbey of Aberconwy , which he had founded, and was buried there. This abbey was later moved to Maenan near Llanrwst , and Llywelyn's stone coffin can now be seen in Llanrwst parish church. Among the poets who lamented his passing was Einion Wan:

"True lord of the land - how strange that today
He rules not o'er Gwynedd;
Lord of nought but the piled up stones of his tomb,
Of the seven-foot grave in which he lies."[60]

Dafydd succeeded Llywelyn as prince of Gwynedd, but King Henry was not prepared to allow him to inherit his father's position in the remainder of Wales. Dafydd was forced to agree to a treaty greatly restricting his power and was also obliged to hand his brother Gruffydd over to the king, who now had the option of using him against Dafydd. Gruffydd was killed attempting to escape from the Tower of London in 1244. This left the field clear for Dafydd, but Dafydd himself died without an heir in 1246 and was eventually succeeded by his nephew, Gruffydd's son, Llywelyn the Last ...

Children
The identity of the mother of some of Llywelyn's children is uncertain. He was survived by nine children, two legitimate, one probably legitimate and six illegitimate. Elen ferch Llywelyn (c.1207-1253), his only certainly legitimate daughter, first married John de Scotia, Earl of Chester. This marriage was childless, and after John's death Elen married Sir Robert de Quincy , the brother of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester . Llywelyn's only legitimate son, Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c.1208-1246), married Isabella de Braose, daughter of William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny , Lord of Abergavenny. William was the son of Reginald de Braose , who married another of Llywelyn's daughters. Dafydd and Isabella may have had one child together, Helen of Wales (1246-1295), but the marriage failed to produce a male heir.

Another daughter, Gwladus Ddu (c.1206-1251), was probably legitimate. Adam of Usk states that she was a legitimate daughter by Joan, although some sources claim that her mother was Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch.[64] She first married Reginald de Braose of Brecon and Abergavenny, but had no children by him. After Reginald's death she married Ralph de Mortimer of Wigmore and had several sons.

The mother of most of Llywelyn's illegitimate children is known or assumed to have been Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch (c.1168-1198). Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (c.1196-1244) was Llywelyn's eldest son and is known to be the son of Tangwystl. He married Senena, daughter of Caradoc ap Thomas of Anglesey . Their four sons included Llywelyn ap Gruffydd , who for a period occupied a position in Wales comparable to that of his grandfather, and Dafydd ap Gruffydd who ruled Gwynedd briefly after his brother's death. Llywelyn had another son, Tegwared ap Llywelyn, by a woman known only as Crysten.
Marared ferch Llywelyn (c.1198-after 1263) married John de Braose of Gower, a nephew of Reginald de Braose, and after his death married Walter Clifford of Bronllys and Clifford. Other illegitimate daughters were Gwenllian ferch Llywelyn, who married William de Lacey, and Angharad ferch Llywelyn, who married Maelgwn Fychan. Susanna ferch Llywelyn was sent to England as a hostage in 1228, but no further details are known...

References

[edit ] Primary sources
Hoare, R.C., ed. 1908. Giraldus Cambrensis: The Itinerary through Wales; Description of Wales. Translated by R.C. Hoare. Everyman's Library. ISBN 0-460-00272-4
Jones, T., ed. 1941. Brut y Tywysogion: Peniarth MS. 20. University of Wales Press.
Pryce, H., ed. 2005. The Acts of Welsh rulers 1120-1283. University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-7083-1897-5

[edit ] Secondary sources
Bartrum, P.C. 1966. Early Welsh Genealogical Tracts. University of Wales Press.
Carr, A. D. 1995. Medieval Wales. Macmillan. ISBN 0-333-54773-X
Davies, R. R. 1987. Conquest, Coexistence and Change: Wales 1063-1415 Clarendon Press, University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-19-821732-3
Lloyd, J. E. 1911. A History of Wales from the Earliest Times to the Edwardian Conquest. Longmans, Green & Co..
Lynch, F. 1995. Gwynedd (A Guide to Ancient and Historic Wales series). HMSO. ISBN 0-11-701574-1
Maund, K. 2006. The Welsh Kings: Warriors, Warlords and Princes. Tempus. ISBN 0-7524-2973-6
Moore, D. 2005. The Welsh wars of independence: c.410-c.1415. Tempus. ISBN 0-7524-3321-0
Powicke, M. 1953. The Thirteenth Century 1216-1307 (The Oxford History of England). Clarendon Press.
Stephenson, D. 1984. The Governance of Gwynedd. University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-7083-0850-3
Williams, G. A. 1964. "The Succession to Gwynedd, 1238-1247" Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies XX (1962-64) 393-413
Weis, Frederick Lewis. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700, lines: 27-27, 29A-27, 29A-28, 132C-29, 176B-27, 177-7, 184A-9, 236-7, 246-30, 254-28, 254-29, 260-31




Children from this marriage were:

+ 326 F    i. Gwladys "Ddu" verch Llewellyn 370 was born about 1206 in Caernarvonshire, Wales and died in 1251 in Windsor, Berkshire, England about age 45.

+ 327 F    ii. Elen ferch Llywelyn Fawr 340 was born about 1207 and died in 1253 about age 46.

+ 328 M    iii. Dafydd ap Llywelyn was born about 1208 and died in 1246 about age 38.

254. William II Longspée 294 (William Longspée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury188, Henry II "Curtmantel", King of England138, Empress Matilda, Countess of Anjou97, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1212 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, died on 8 Feb 1250 in Al-Mansura, Egypt about age 38, and was buried in Acre, Palestine. Another name for William was William II Longespée.

Death Notes: On the Nile

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - William II Longespée :

Sir William II Longespée (c. 1212 - 8 February, 1250) was the son of William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury , an English noble. His death became of significant importance to the English psyche, having died as a martyr due to the purported mistakes, and arrogance, of the French at the Battle of Mansurah , near Al-Mansurah in Egypt .

Longespee made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1240, and again in 1247. The second time, he proceeded to Rome and made a plea to Pope Innocent IV for support:

"Sir, you see that I am signed with the cross and am on my journey with the King of France to fight in this pilgrimage. My name is great and of note, viz., William Longespee, but my estate is slender, for the King of England , my kinsman and liege lord, hath bereft me of the title of earl and of that estate, but this he did judiciously, and not in displeasure, and by the impulse of his will; therefore I do not blame him for it. Howbeit, I am necessitated to have recourse to your holiness for favour, desiring your assistance in this distress. We see here (quoth he) that Earl Richard (of Cornwall) who, though he is not signed with the cross, yet, through the especial grace of your holiness, he hath got very much money from those who are signed, and therefore, I, who am signed and in want, do intreat the like favour."[1]

Having succeeded in gaining the favour of the Pope, Longespee raised a company of 200 English horse to join with Louis IX on his crusade. To raise funds for his expedition, he sold a charter of liberties to the burgesses of the town of Poole in 1248 for 70 marks .[2] During the Seventh Crusade , Longespee commanded the English forces. He became widely known for his feats of chivalry and his subsequent martyrdom. The circumstances of his death served to fuel growing English animosity toward the French; it is reported that the French Count d'Artois lured Longespee into attacking the Mameluks before the forces of King Louis IX arrived in support. Robert d'Artois, William II Longespee and his men, along with 280 Knights Templar , were killed at this time.

It is said that his mother, Abbess Ela Longespee, had a vision of the martyr being received into heaven by angels just one day prior to his death. In 1252, the Sultan delivered Longespee's remains to a messenger who conveyed them to Acre (Akko ) for burial at the church of St. Cross. However, his effigy is found amongst family members at Salisbury Cathedral , in England.

Marriage and issue
William married Idoine de Camville, daughter of Richard de Camville & Eustacia Basset. They had two sons and two daughters:
Ida Longespee , who married Walter FitzRobert Lord of Dunmow
Ela Longespee , married James De Audley (1220-1272), son of Henry De Audley & Bertred Mainwaring
William III Longespee
Richard Longespee

William married Idoine de Camville,334 daughter of Richard de Camville, of Stratton Audley and Eustacia Basset, in Jun 1226. Idoine was born about 1209 in <Brattleby, Lincolnshire>, England and died on 1 Jan 1251 about age 42.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 329 F    i. Ela Longspee 371 was born about 1226 in England and died on 22 Nov 1299 about age 73.

255. Alan La Zouche 295 (Geoffrey I de Porhoët189, Constance, Princess of Bretagne139, Maud, Princess of England99, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1157 in <Harringworth, Northamptonshire>, England and died in 1190 in North Melton, Devonshire, England about age 33. Other names for Alan were Alan la Coche, Alan de Porhoët, and Alan la Zouche.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Baron Zouche:

Baron Zouche is a title that has thrice been created in the Peerage of England . The de la Zouche family descended from Alan la Zouche, 1st Baron la Zouche of Ashby , sometimes called Alan de Porhoët and Alan la Coche (c. 1136-1190), a Breton who settled in England during the reign of Henry II . He was the son of Vicomte Geoffrey I de Porhoët and Hawisa of Brittany. He married Adeline (Alice) de Belmeis, daughter of Phillip de Belmeis and Maud la Meschine and died at North Melton in Devon . He obtained Ashby in Leicestershire (called after him Ashby-de-la-Zouch ) by his marriage. His son was Roger la Zouche (c. 1175- bef. 14 May 1238).

Alan married Alice de Belmeis,106 daughter of Philip de Belmeis, Lord of Tong, Salop and Ashby, co. Leicester and Maud la Meschine, about 1181 in Josselin, Morbihan, France. Alice was born about 1160 in <Harringworth, Northamptonshire>, England. Other names for Alice were Adeleza de Belmeis, Adelicia de Belmeis, and Adeline de Belmeis.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 330 M    i. Roger La Zouche 372 was born about 1182 in <Ashby, Leicestershire>, England and died before 14 May 1238.

256. Bertrade de Montfort, of Evreux 296 (Simon III de Montfort, Count of Evreux190, Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester140, Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1). Other names for Bertrade were Bertred of Evreux and Bertrade d'Evreux de Montfort.

Research Notes: Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Bertrade married Hugh, of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester,221 son of Ranulf IV, de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester and Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester, in 1169. Hugh was born in 1147 in Kevelioc, Monmouthshire, Wales and died on 30 Jun 1181 in Leek, Staffordshire, England at age 34. Another name for Hugh was Hugh de Meschines 5th Earl of Chester.

Marriage Notes: Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 126-28

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester :

Hugh de Kevelioc, Earl of Chester (1147 - 30 June 1181) was the son of Ranulf de Gernon and Maud of Gloucester, daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (otherwise known as Robert de Caen , the illegitimate son of Henry I of England , making her Henry's granddaughter).

He is thought by some to have taken his name from Kevelioc in Monmouth as his birthplace, but others think that instead he was born in, and took the name of, the cwmwd of Cyfeiliog (in modern Powys ) in the southern part of the Kingdom of Powys , Wales .

He was underage when his father's death in 1153 made him heir to his family's estates on both sides of the channel. He joined the baronial Revolt of 1173-1174 against King Henry II of England , and was influential in convincing the Bretons to revolt. After being captured and imprisoned after the Battle of Alnwick , he finally got his estates restored in 1177, and served in King Henry's Irish campaigns.

In 1169 he married Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux , daughter of Simon III de Montfort . She was the cousin of King Henry, who gave her away in marriage. Their children were:
Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester
Maud of Chester (1171-1233), married David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon
Mabel of Chester, married William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel
Agnes of Chester (died 2 November 1247), married William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby
Hawise of Chester (1180-1242), married Robert II de Quincy
A daughter, name unknown, who was briefly married to Llywelyn Fawr

He also had an illegitimate daughter, Amice of Chester, who married Ralph de Mainwaring.

Hugh of Kevelioc died 30 June 1181 at Leek , Staffordshire , England.

Noted events in his life were:

• Vicomte d'Avranches, Normandy:

(Duplicate Line. See Person 192)

257. Isabel Brus 220 (Joanna de Meschines191, Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester140, Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1160 in Skelton, North Yorkshire, England, died after 1230, and was buried in Whitby Abbey, North Riding, Yorkshire, England. Another name for Isabel was Isabel Bruce.

Isabel married Henry de Percy, 5th Baron Percy,373 son of Joscelin, de Louvain and Agnes de Percy, about 1182 in Cleveland, Yorkshire, England. Henry was born about 1156 in <Whitby>, Yorkshire, England, died before 29 Sep 1198, and was buried in St. Lo, Rouen, France.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 331 M    i. William de Percy, 6th Baron Percy 373 was born about 1193 in <Alnwick>, Northumberland, England, died before 28 Jul 1245, and was buried in Salley Abbey, Craven, Yorkshire, England.

258. Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester (Hugh, of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester192, Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester140, Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1172, died on 26 Oct 1232 at age 60, and was buried in St. Werburg's, Chester, Cheshire, England. Another name for Ranulf was Ranulph de Meschines 4th Earl of Chester and Lincoln.

Research Notes: From Wikipedia - Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester :

Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester[1] born 1172 - died 1232, known in some references as the 4th Earl (in the second lineage of the title after the original family line was broken after the 2nd Earl) was one of the "old school" of Anglo-Norman barons whose loyalty to the Angevin dynasty was consistent but contingent on the receipt of lucrative favours. He was described as "almost the last relic of the great feudal aristocracy of the Conquest".[2]

Early life
Ranulf, born in 1172,[1] was the son of Hugh de Kevelioc and Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux . He was said to have been small in physical stature.
He succeeded to the earldom of Chester (like his father before him) as a minor (aged nine) and attained his majority in 1187, which gave him control of his estates in England and Normandy.

[edit ] Early career
In 1189, aged seventeen, he was married to Constance of Brittany , the widow of Henry II 's son Geoffrey, and the mother of Arthur of Brittany , with whom King John contested the succession. Henry did not trust the Countess and wanted her married to a magnate he could trust The marriage gave Ranulf control of the earldom of Richmond and the duchy of Brittany , but was not a success and they separated.
In 1196, King Richard I of England nominated the nine-year-old Arthur as his heir, and summoned him and his mother, Countess Constance, to Normandy. Constance left Nantes and travelled towards Rouen . On the way she was abducted by her estranged husband. Richard, furious, marched to Brittany at the head of an army, intent on rescuing his nephew. Arthur was secretly taken away by his tutor to the French court to be brought up with Louis , son of the French king Philip II .
In 1199, Constance escaped from her husband and their marriage was dissolved on the grounds of desertion.
In 1200 Ranulf cemented his power in Normandy by marrying Clemence of Fougères; she was the daughter of William of Fougères , widow of Alan de Dinant , and sister of Geoffrey of Fougères . He had opposed John's attempted coup of 1193-4, and retained many contacts with partisans of his former stepson Arthur. He spent most of 1199-1204 in France and his continued loyalty was bought by John with further patronage. However the King was suspicious of the Earl, perhaps with some reason. In the winter of 1204-5, Ranulph, suspected of dealings with the rebellious Welsh and of contemplating revolt himself, had extensive estates temporarily confiscated by the king. This episode apparently convinced Ranulph to show loyalty in future. Thereafter he was showered with royal favours. In return he fought John's Welsh wars 1209-12; helped secure the peace with the pope in 1213-14, and was with the king in Poitou in 1214.
Loyal to the king in 1215-16, he was one of the few magnates to witness the Magna Carta of 1215. He played a leading military role in the civil war by virtue of his extensive estates and numerous castles. Ranulf stood with William Marshal and the Earls of Derby and Warwick with the King, whilst the other nobility of the land stood with the enemy or remained aloof from the conflict

Regency
On John's death in 1216, Ranulf's influence increased further. There was an expectation at Gloucester that Ranulf would contend for the regency for the young Henry III . Events moved quickly at Gloucester, where William Marshal and the young king were, in Ranulph's absence. The Marshal was put forward and offered the regency by the nobility and clerics gathered at Gloucester before the arrival of Ranulph. There was concern that Ranulph might object to the decision, but when he arrived (29 October 1216) he stated that he did not want to be regent, so any potential conflict vanished.

Campaign of 1217
Before John's death, rebel barons had offered the throne of England to Louis, the heir to the French throne. Louis had invaded the country during the summer of 1216 and had taken Winchester. De Blondeville put his political weight behind re-issuing the Magna Carta in 1216 and 1217; his military experience was utilised in defeating the rebels at Lincoln in 1217. Ranulph was based in the north midlands and was charged with stopping the northern barons linking up with Louis in the south.
The Earl chose to combine personal concerns with those of the country by attacking Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester 's castle at Mountsorrel in Leicestershire - from which the Earl of Winchester's predecessors had ousted Ranulph's grandfather, Ranulf de Gernon . Louis was persuaded by the Earl of Winchester to send a relief force to the castle. When they arrived, de Blondeville and the Royalist force were gone. In fact they had headed to Lincoln to deal with a French force besieging the castle there.
William Marshal with his main army at Northampton also made for the city, and at Lincoln a battle was fought between the Royalists headed by William Marshal and de Blondeville and the French forces and their allies. The battle went in favour of the Royalists, and they captured forty-six Barons and the Earls of Winchester, Hereford and Lincoln. Following the battle Ranulf was created Earl of Lincoln .

[edit ] Fifth Crusade
In 1218, de Blondeville decided to honour the crusading vow he had made three years previously, and he journeyed eastwards. He met up with the Count of Nevers and the Count of La Marche in Genoa , accompanied by the Earls of Derby, Arundel and Winchester. They then sailed on towards Egypt and the Nile. An icy winter in camp was followed by a burning summer which affected the morale of the crusaders greatly. During September 1219, the Sultan, wary of the conflict outside Damietta , offered the Crusaders a startling bargain - Bethlehem, Nazareth, Jerusalem and central Palastine and Galilee, so long as the Crusaders gave up their war in Egypt. Earl Ranulph was one of many voices in support of taking the offer, and was supported by his English peers. However, Bishop Pelagius , the Patriarch of Jerusalem and the military orders would have none of it. They finally refused the offer and on 5 November they found the walls of Damietta poorly manned, so they attacked and secured the city. When winter came the army was smouldering with discontent. Earl Ranulf left Damietta in September of 1220, with his fellow English earls, leaving behind an indecisive force under the command of Bishop Pelagius and the Military Orders. Upon the crusade's failure he returned to England to find his rival, William Marshal dead and the government in the hands of Hubert de Burgh.

[edit ] Final years
From 1220 to 1224, tensions grew between government officials and old loyalists of King John. This flared into open conflict in the winter of 1223-4 when Ranulf among others briefly tried to resist de Burgh's policy of resumption of sheriffdoms and royal castles. Ranulf built Bolingbroke Castle near Spilsby in Lincolnshire around 1220, later the birthplace of King Henry IV . Ranulf was briefly made castellan of Wallingford Castle . He made an alliance with Llywelyn the Great , whose daughter Elen married Ranulf's nephew and heir, John the Scot , in about 1222.
De Blondeville's final years saw him acting as an elder statesman, witnessing the 1225 re-issue of the Magna Carta, playing a prominent role in the dispute in 1227 over Forest Laws and, as a veteran, leading Henry III's army on the ill-fated Poitou expedition of 1230-1. He came to lead the campaign after the death of William Marshal (the younger). He showed vigour and made a thrust into Anjou, but by the end of June the French had reached the Breton border. Ranulf concluded the campaign with a truce with the King of France for three years, to end in 1234.
Earl Ranulf kept in sight his personal advantage. In 1220 some of his estates avoided carucage ; in 1225 Aid was not levied in Cheshire; and in 1229 he successfully resisted the ecclesiastical tax collector. His only major failure, in old age, was not avoiding the 1232 levy of the fortieth on his lands.

Ranulf's death
Ranulf died on 26 October 1232[1], aged sixty. His viscera were buried at Wallingford Castle, his heart at DieuLacres Abbey (which he had founded), and the remainder of his body at St Werburg's in Chester . His earldom of Lincoln passed to Margaret de Quincy, daughter of his youngest sister Hawise , who had married John de Lacy . His own earldom of Chester went to the son of his sister Maud of Chester , John the Scot .

Noted events in his life were:

• Witnessed the Magna Charta: 1215.

259. Mabel, of Chester 297 (Hugh, of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester192, Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester140, Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1173.

Research Notes: Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-27 (William d'Aubigny)

Mabel married William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel,374 son of William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel and Sussex and Maud de St. Hilary, Betw 1196 and 1199. William was born before 1180, died on 1 Feb 1221 in [near Rome], (Italy), and was buried in Wymondham Abbey, Wymondham, Norfolk, England. Another name for William was William d' Aubigny 3rd Earl of Arundel.

Death Notes: Other sources have d. March 1220/1221

Research Notes: Crusader, named in the Magna Charta, 1215

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-27

From Wikipedia - William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel :

William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel (before 1180 - 1 February 1221) was a son of William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel and Matilda St Hilary .

Lineage
His paternal grandparents were William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel and Adeliza of Leuven . His maternal grandparents were James de St. Hilaire and his wife Aveline.

A royal favourite
William was a favourite of King John . He witnessed King John's concession of the kingdom to the Pope on 15 May 1213. On 14 June 1216 he joined Prince Louis (later Louis VIII of France ) after King John abandoned Winchester . He returned to the allegiance of the King Henry III after the Royalist victory at Lincoln , on 14 July 1217.

Death returning from the Fifth Crusade
He joined in the Fifth Crusade (1217-1221), in 1218. He died on his journey home, in Caneill, Italy, near Rome , on 1 February 1221. News of his death reached England on 30 March 1221. He was brought home and buried at Wymondham Abbey .
His title was held by his son William , until he died, childless, in 1224, when it was passed to William's youngest son Hugh .

Marriage and Issue
After 1196 and before 1200 William married Mabel of Chester (born c. 1173), daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux. They were the parents of seven children.
Maud d'Aubigny
Cicely d'Aubigny
Colette d'Aubigny
William d'Aubigny, 4th Earl of Arundel (d. 1224); buried Wymondham Abbey
Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel (d. 7 May 1243); buried Wymondham Abbey
Isabel d'Aubigny ; married John Fitzalan, Lord of Oswestry , by whom she had issue.
Nicole d'Aubigny; married Roger De Somery

Sources
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 16C-26, 126-29, 149-27.
Remfry, P.M., Buckenham Castles, 1066 to 1649 (ISBN 1-899376-28-3 )
G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 237.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 332 F    i. Nichole d' Aubigny .375

+ 333 F    ii. Isabel d'Aubigny .

260. Hawise, of Chester, Countess of Lincoln 298 (Hugh, of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester192, Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester140, Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1180 and died between 1241 and 1243. Another name for Hawise was Hawyse of Chester.

Research Notes: Sister and coheiress of Ranulph de Meschines, fourth Earl of Chester and Lincoln.

Hawise married Robert II de Quincy,266 son of Saher IV de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester and Margaret de Beaumont,. Robert died in 1257 in <Palestine>. Other names for Robert were Robert de Quincey and Robert the Younger de Quincey.

Research Notes: Second son named Robert.

From Wikipedia - Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester :

Robert de Quincy (second son of that name; d. 1257) who married Helen , daughter of the Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great ;

"Robert (d. 1217). Some sources say he married Hawise, sister and co-heiress of Ranulf de Blundeville, earl of Chester . However, it is more likely Hawise married Saer's brother Robert II;"
---------
Ancestral Roots, Line 54-28 (Robert II de Quincy), has "d.v.p. bef. 1232,... m. Hawise of Chester (125-29), b. 1180, d. 1241/3, Countess of Lincoln." The "d.v.p. bef. 1232 makes him appear to be the first Robert.


Noted events in his life were:

• Crusader:

(Duplicate Line. See Person 229)

261. Agnes, of Chester, Lady of Chartley 299 (Hugh, of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester192, Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester140, Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) died on 2 Nov 1247. Another name for Agnes was Alice of Chester.

Agnes married William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby,376 son of William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby and Sibyl de Braose, in 1192 in Cheshire, England. William was born about 1162 in Ferrers, Derbyshire, England and died on 22 Sep 1247 about age 85.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 334 M    i. Sir William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby 377 was born about 1193 in <Derbyshire>, England, died on 28 Mar 1254 in Evington, Leicestershire, England about age 61, and was buried on 31 Mar 1254 in Merevale Abbey, Merevale, Warwickshire, England.

262. Amice, of Chester 300 (Hugh, of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester192, Maud FitzRobert, of Gloucester140, Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester100, Henry I "Beauclerc", King of England56, Matilda, of Flanders30, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born about 1167. Another name for Amice was Amicia de Meschines.

Research Notes: Illegitimate daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester, according to Wikipedia.

Amice married Ralph de Mainwaring,378 son of Roger de Mainwaring and Ellen, in 1179 in Warmingham, Cheshire, England. Ralph was born about 1155 in <Warmingham, Cheshire>, England. Another name for Ralph was Rafe de Mainwaring.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 335 F    i. Bertred Mainwaring 379 was born about 1196 in England and died after 1249.

263. Beatriz, of Swabia 302 (Philip II, of Swabia, King of Germany194, Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor143, Judith, of Bavaria102, Henry I, Duke of Bavaria57, Judith, of Normandy31, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1198 and died in 1212 at age 14. Other names for Beatriz were Beatrice of Hohenstaufen and Elisabeth of Swabia.

Research Notes: Childless.

264. Cunigunde, of Hohenstaufen 302 (Philip II, of Swabia, King of Germany194, Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor143, Judith, of Bavaria102, Henry I, Duke of Bavaria57, Judith, of Normandy31, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born in 1200 and died in 1248 at age 48.

265. Marie, of Hohenstaufen 303 (Philip II, of Swabia, King of Germany194, Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor143, Judith, of Bavaria102, Henry I, Duke of Bavaria57, Judith, of Normandy31, Adele Capet, Princess of France15, Constance, of Provence7, Adelaide "la Blanche", of Anjou4, Foulques "le Bon", Comté d'Anjou2, Foulques "le Roux", Comté d'Anjou1) was born on 3 Apr 1201 in Arezzo, Tuscany, Italy and died on 29 Mar 1235 in Leuven, Brabant, Flanders, Belgium at age 33. Other names for Marie were Marie of Swabia and Mary of Hohenstaufen.

Death Notes: Wikipedia has d. 29 March 1235. Ancestral Roots has d. abt 1240.

Research Notes: First wife of Henry II.

From Wikipedia - Marie of Hohenstaufen :

Marie of Hohenstaufen, Duchess of Brabant (3 April 1201 - 29 March 1235 ) was a member of the powerful Hohenstaufen dynasty. She is also known as Maria of Swabia. She was the third daughter of Philip of Swabia and Irene Angelina of Byzantium . Her husband was Henry II, Duke of Brabant .


Family
Marie of Hohenstaufen was born in Arezzo ,Tuscany , Italy on 3 April 1201. Her paternal grandparents were Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor and Beatrice I, Countess of Burgundy . Her maternal grandparents were Byzantine Emperor Isaac II Angelos and his first wife Herina Tornikaina[1].
Emperor Frederick II was her first cousin.
In 1208, at the age of seven, Marie was left an orphan by the unexpected deaths of her parents. On 21 June , her father was murdered by Otto of Wittelsbach , and two months later her mother died after giving birth to a daughter, who did not live beyond early infancy. Marie had three surviving sisters.


Siblings
Beatrice of Hohenstaufen (1198-1212, married Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor . The marriage was childless.
Cunigunde of Hohenstaufen (1200-1248), married in 1228 King Wenceslaus I of Bohemia , by whom she had issue.
Elizabeth of Hohenstaufen (1203- 5 November 1235), married in 1219 King Ferdinand III of Castile , by whom she had issue, including King Alfonso X of Castile . She was his first wife. Ferdinand married his second wi