Major Richard Ewen
(Abt 1608-1669)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Sophia Scarborough

Major Richard Ewen 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

  • Born: Abt 1608, <England or Scotland>
  • Marriage (1): Sophia Scarborough about 1625 in <England>
  • Died: 16 Apr 1669, Annapolis, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States) about age 61

   Another name for Richard was Richard Ewen Major.

  Research Notes:

I have been unable thus far to find reliable information on the parents of Major Richard Ewen. kjf 4/6/2010.
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Was an immediate neighbor of Edward Lloyd on the Magothy on the north side of the Severn, in the neck, just opposite Annapolis, Maryland. He also held a good amount of property in other Maryland locations.

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From Helene Stone (helenestone@yahoo.com) 21 Sep 2009:
"My records show that Richard Ewen patented land in Virginia in 1638 and came to Maryland in 1649."

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I verified that this information is correct. As yet undetermined, however, is whether Major Richard Ewen is the same individual as Richard Owens, who was one of the "non-conformists" (Puritans) who settled in Virginia in the 1630's and 1640's. The laws of the Virginia province required that its landholders adhere to the Church of England. Persons who did not do so were banished from the colony. This situation came to a head in 1648, when the Puritans had until October 1648 to conform to the Church. Instead of doing so, the majority of the Virginia settlers, invited by the Protestant governor of Maryland, William Stone, relocated to Maryland, where they were given patents for undeveloped land. A good description of these events can be found in Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, pp. 5-10.

As evidence that there were likely two individuals of similar names (Richard Owens and Richard Ewen) in the same places and times, both men are mentioned in Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, in successive and different contexts. Richard Owens was among the Puritan landholders in Virginia who relocated to Maryland in 1648 or 1649. From that book, page 8:

"[John Hammond, the historian,] declares, 'Maryland was considered by the Puritans as a refuge. The lord proprietor [Calvert, Lord Baltimore] and his governor [William Stone] solicited, and several addresses made for their admittance and entertainment into that province, under the conditions that they should have convenient portions of land assigned, the liberty of conscience and privilege to choose their own officers.'

"'After their arrival,' continues Hammond, 'an assembly was called throughout the whole county, consisting as well of themselves as the rest, and because there were some few papists that first inhabited, these themselves, and others, being different judgements, an act was passed that all professing Jesus Christ should have equal justice.' And, 'At the request of the Virginia Puritans,' the oath of fidelity was overhauled and this clause added to it: 'Provided it infringe not the liberty of conscience.'

"This was confirmed in 1650.

"In confirmation of Hammond's statement, our 'Rent Rolls' show that Edward Lloyd, in 1649, was granted a permit to lay out one thousand acres on the western side of the Chesapeake Bay to the northward of the Patuxent River, and a small creek, about the middle of 'The Cliffs,' adjoining the lands of Richard Owens, there and to the northward of the Patuxent, not formally taken up yet.'"

The above is the Richard Owens whose land adjoined Edward Lloyd's north of the Patuxent, in the vicinity of "The Cliffs." Those tracts were a great distance south of the Magothy River (see below).

References to Richard Ewen by that name follow here. (Remember, Richard Owens and Richard Ewen were probably different individuals):

Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, p. 10:

"[In 1650 the house of Edward Lloyd, newly-made commander of Providence (Anne Arundel County) by Governor Stone's appointment] was the Council Chamber. His immediate neighbors were William Crouch, on the Severn; Richard Young, on the Magothy; Ralph Hawkins, of the Magothy; Richard Ewen, of the Magothy; William Hopkins, Thomas Browne, John Browne, Henry Catlyn, John Clarke were all near the Commander upon North Severn."

Ibid., p. 13:

"HERRING CREEK HUNDRED"

"Samuel Chew laid out Herrington.

"[In 1649 and 1650] Thomas Marsh took up lands on the west side of Herring Creek, beginning at Parker's Branch, and running to Selby's Cove; he also held a thousand acres adjoining Richard Bennett, running up the bay... [Edward Selby] adjoined Thomas Meeres on the west side of South River, next to John Watkins; in all some 1000 acres. William Parker adjoined Thomas Marsh on Herring Creek, and also, Richard Bennett, Sampson Warring, and Thomas Davis on the bay, holding 1200 acres. William Durand adjoined Edward Selby, running down the bay; John Covell adjoined William Durand; Thomas Emerson adjoined William Parker; Captain Edward Carter, near Herring Creek, adjoined William Ayers, whose lands were assigned him by Thomas Marsh. Richard Ewen adjoined Richard Bennett and Richard Talbott, on Herring Creek. Richard Wells, Chirurgeon, was on the west side of Herring Bay, adjoining Stockett's Creek, holding 600 acres. The three Stockett brothers were on Stockett's Run; they did not come from Virginia... Richard Bennett held thousands of acres at Herring Creek, and later as many more upon the Eastern Shore."

Ibid., pp. 27-29:
"[After the 'Battle of the Severn' on 25 March 1655] In 1657, Captain [William] Fuller called an Assembly to meet at the home of Colonel Richard Preston, on the Patuxent. The lower house consisted of ten members, with Colonel Richard Ewen speaker. There were present, besides the speaker, Captain Robert Sley, Captain Joseph Weeks, Mr. Robert Taylor, Captain Thomas Besson, Mr. Peter Sharp, Captain Phil Morgan, Mr. Richard Brooks and Mr. James Johnson. They confirmed the 'Act of Recognition.' On the 30th of November, 1657, Lord Baltimore and Richard Bennett completed their compromise. In substance it was an agreement by Lord Baltimore to overlook the disturbance of the Severn; to grant patents of land to all the Puritan settlers who could claim them, by taking an altered oath of fidelity,--whilst the law granting freedom of religion should stand as proclaimed in 1649. Bennett and Matthews signed the agreement with Lord Baltimore. Governor Fendall, who had been called to England for further instructions, returned to the province in 1658. He called his council together at St. Mary's, and sent letters [to those composing the government at Providence], desiring them to give him and his secretary, Captain Thomas Corwallis, a meeting at Leonard's Creek, in Patuxent River, upon March 18th, following...

"On account of the stormy season, the delegates of Anne Arundel did not arrive until the 20th. They were Captain Wm. Fuller, Mr. Richard Preston, Mr. Edward Lloyd, Mr. Thomas Meeres, Mr. Philip Thomas, and Mr. Samuel Withers...

"After the lapse of six years, his Lordship's dominion was again restored, yet the settlers were still independent. Governor Fendall and his secretary had, in 1657, at a meeting on the Severn, taken up the settlement of Anne Arundel and ordered, 'That Wm. Burgess, Thomas Meeres, Robert Burle, Thomas Todde, Roger Grosse, Thomas Howell, Richard Wells, Richard Ewen, John Brewer, Anthony Salway and Richard Woolman, gentlemen, should be commissioners for said county, to appear by summons of the sheriff, at the house of Edward Lloyd, to take oath of Commissioners and Justices of the Peace, and that the 23rd instant should be the first court day.--(By order of the Governor and Secretary, Mr. Nathaniel Utie, at Anne Arundel, July 12th, 1657).'

"The warrant was issued by Captain John Norwood, Sheriff. Wm. Burgess, Thomas Meeres and Richard Ewen refused to take the oath of Commissioners of Justice, alleging, as an excuse, that it was not lawful to swear.

"Their pleas were refused and Captain Thomas Besson, Captain Howell and Thomas Taylor were appointed in their stead.

"Then was taken up the establishment of militia force. It was resolved that the forces be divided into two regiments. One for the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers, commanded by the governor himself; the other, from the coves up to the Severn, and including the Isle of Kent, to be commanded by Nathaniel Utie, assisted by Captain John Cumber, Major Richard Ewen and Captain Thomas Howell, on South River, up to the head of it."

Ibid., p. 29:
"A writ was issued in 1657, to Captain John Norwood, to choose burgesses for an assembly to be held at St. Leonard's, in the County of Calvert. The assembly met at St. Leonard's in 1658. It was there enacted, 'That the oath of fidelity shall not be pressed upon the people of the province, but instead, a promise to submit to the authority of the Right Honorable Cecilius Lord Baltimore, and his heirs within the province, and that none should be disarmed.'

"This was agreed to by Captain Josias Fendall and Philip Calvert, principal secretary. It was also assented to by the Upper and Lower House of Burgesses."

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From Baltimore: Its History and Its People, Vol. III pp. 794-5:

"Major Richard Ewen, who came to Maryland in 1649, demanded and received from the government a grant of one thousand acres of land for transporting himself, his family, and three other persons to the colony 'at his own expense'. He was a prominent man, having been appointed and served on several commissions, was for many years a member of the House of Burgesses, during a part of which time he acted as its speaker. He married Sophia ___________, who survived him and married (second) Colonel William Burgess, also a prominent man in the community. They had one child, Susanna, who married Major Nicholas, son of Hon. Henry and Jane (Lowe) Sewall, of Mathapany, on the Pautuxent. Jane (Lowe) Sewall married (second) Charles, third Lord Baltimore. Dr. Christopher Johnson was a descendant of Major Nicholas and Susanna (Ewen) Sewall."

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From Side-Lights on Maryland History, Vol. 2, p. 427:

"...Major Richard Ewen, one of the commissioners to govern Maryland under Oliver Cromwell. .. Major Richard Ewen, father-in-law of William Richardson, was one of the Council of War after the battle of the Severn, which condemned Governor Stone and others to die."

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From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jhmjr&id=I15021, which quotes Craycrofts of Maryland and Kentucky Kin, p. 15:

"... Major Richard Ewen was one of ten commissioners appointed 22 July 1654, by Bennett and Claiborne, to direct the affairs of Maryland under Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of England. The Puritans called a General Assembly at Patuxent in 1654, barring Catholics and those who bore arms against Parliament, and passed The Act of Recognition 20 October 1654 enacting laws for the governing of the Province.

Ewen served twice as speaker of the Lower House. He served as speaker in the session of the General Assembly called 24 September 1657, during Cromwell's rule in England. He was a burgess from Anne Arundel County in the session of the Assembly called at Lord Baltimore's direction 28 February 1660, and served as speaker of the Lower House for the second time. It was during this session and under Ewen's leadership as speaker that it was resolved that the Assembly should continue as a bicameral legislative body.

Capt. Richard Ewen was one of the commissioners present at a Provincial Court 13 August 1655. He subsequently was commissioned as a major of the militia 12 July 1658. On 22 July 1658 be was asked to take an oath of office but Major Ewen desired to be excused because of his military appointment, and his excuse was allowed. Another commissioner was appointed in his stead.

Richard Ewen immigrated to Virginia and transported Nicholas Ewen and Christopher Roades. He received a patent for 150 acres of land in Norfolk Co., Virginia, 14 August 1638 for his own personal adventure and the transportation of two persons. He assigned his right to this tract of land to John Wright in July 1643.

He entered Maryland in 1649 and was granted 1,000 acres of land in Herring Creek Hundred on West River. He received a grant of 350 acres of land south of Patapsco River 19 November 1652, and a grant of 600 acres of land on the Severn River 26 November 1652.

During the Cromwellian regime in England, Gov. William Stone was displaced from his authority in Maryland. He attempted to reestablish himself as governor and entered the northern stronghold by boat. In the ensuing battle of the Severn, Capt. Richard Ewen commanded one of the "Trayn Bands of Patuxent," a company of militia. Three days following the defeat and capture of Stone and fifty of his men, Ewen was one of the eight members of the council of war who condemned Stone and eight other men to death, four of whom were executed." [Note, one of the four was Thomas Hatton, the uncle of Elizabeth Hatton who married Luke Gardiner]

Maj. Richard Ewen died intestate. He named five of his children, Elizabeth, Richard, John, Susanna, and Ann, in his demand for 1,000 acres of land in 1650."

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From Some Prominent Virginia Families, p. 340:

"[Richardsons] came with the Chews, Coles, Thomases, Ewens, Sparrows, Hutchens and Pierponts. Some of [Elizabeth Richardson's] immediate ancestors were prominent men in the early history of the Colony. Among them was William Richardson, a leading citizen of Anne Arundel Co., for many years a member of the General Assembly. He came to Maryland with Maj. Richard Ewen, before 1650. He was a Major in the forces of the Colony; Speaker of the Assembly several times; member of the Council, and one of the 'High Commissioners,' to govern Maryland under Protector Cromwell. Maj. Ewen was one of the first to take up land on the Patapsco River. On November 19, 20, 21, and 22, 1655, Lord Baltimore, Surveyor General, laid out tracts of land on the Patapsco River for several persons, including Maj. Ewen and Thomas Sparrow, also an ancestor of Elizabeth Richardson. The land taken up by Thomas Sparrow has since been known as 'Sparrow's Point.' John Chew and his son, Samuel Chew, were also members of the General Assembly and among the most prominent men in the Colony. Both left large estates for their day."

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From Some Colonial Mansions, pp. 372-373:

"ACTS and orders of a Generall Assembly holden for the Province of Maryland at Patuxent the 20th of October 1654 by Commission from his Highness the Lord Protector of England Scotland and Ireland and the Dominions thereunto belonging.

"Present:
Capt. Wm. Fuller
Mr. Richd. Preston, Speaker
Mr. Leo. Strong
Mr. John Hatch
Mr. Richd Wells
Mr. Richd Ewen
Mr. Wm Durand
Mr. Tho. Hinson
Mr. Edw. Lloyd
Mr. Arthur Turner
Mr. Wm. Parker
Mr. Jno. Wade
Mr. Sampson Waring
Mr. James Berry
Mr. Wm. Ewen
Mr. Joseph Weekes

"The Act of Recognition

"It is Enacted and Declared in the Name of his Highness the Lord Protector of England Scotland and Ireland and the Dominions thereunto belonging and the Authority of this present Generall Assembly.

"That the Reducing of this Province of Maryland by power of the Supreame Authority of the Commonwealth of England Committed to Richd Bennett Esqr and Collo William Cleyborne, and the Goverment as it is now Settled by Commission granted to Capt Wm Fuller, Mr. Richd Preston, Mr. Wm Durand, Mr. Edward Lloyd, Mr. Leonard Strong, Mr. John Hatch, Mr. John Lawson, Mr. Richard Wells, Mr. Wm Parker, Mr. Richd Ewen, is acknowledged by this Assembly, and freely and fully Submitted unto, and that no power either from the Lord Baltimore or any other, ought or shall make any alteration in the Government aforesaid as it is now Settled, unless it be from the Supreame Authority of the Commonwealth of England Exercsed by his highness the Lord Protector, Imediatly and Directly granted for that purpose. That after publication of this Act, all the Inhabitants of the Province are required to delcare in particular & Express Termes under their hands their owning and accepting of the present Government and Subjection thereunto; That all such person or persons that deny the present Government, or do either in word or deed traduce, vilifie or Scandalize the Same or by action Secret or open, disquiet, oppose, or disturb the said Government Shall be accounted offenders against the Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England the peace and wellfare of this Province and be dealt with according to their offence."

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From http://genforum.genealogy.com/ewen/messages/180.html :
I have received information on Elizabeth Ewen Talbott and her father Major Richard Ewen through the Genealogical society of Rockingham & Stokes County, North Carolina where my line through William Richardson & Elizabeth settled generations later. William Richardson was a prominent Quaker and had a home in West River Maryland with Elizabeth. The article was written by Wm L. (Butch Johnson)

The Ewen family settled in Maryland in 1649 and it appears that Elizabeth Ewen was possibly married at that time, which would indicate that Richard Talbott was her second husband. In 1650 May 17th, Richard Ewen demandeth One Thousand Acres of land for transporting himself and nine persons into this province the last year Vizt. Sophia his wife Eliza Davy, Richard Ewen Jr., John Ewen, Suzanna Ewen, Ann Ewen, William Davies, John King and James Brown at his own Charges. Tester James Cox. John Hall Warrt. to lay out One Thousand Acres of Land for Richard Ewen at Parson's Neck upon Kent County or in any part of that or Anne Arundel County rct by Michas next.

The origin of the Ewen family is not known with any certainty. One Richard Ewen immigrated to Virginia where he received 150 acres of land in the Upper County of New Norfolk "Due for his personal adventure & transportation of two persons: Nicholas Ewen and Christopher Roades." A possible clue to Richards Ewen's origins prior to coming to Virginia is to be found in the naming of his 600 acre grant of land on the Chesapeake Bay near the Severn River on November 26, 1652, which he called "Scotland."

Richard Ewen was active in the affairs of Maryland for about ten years. ...during 4 years nearly, he served as a member of the board of commissioners which (after Gov. Stone's submission) controlled the affairs of the Colony; at nearly every General Assembly he was one of the representatives of his county, and twice (or oftener) was speaker of the house of Burgesses: he was sheriff of the county,1664 and 1665;his duties as an officer of the militia, during about five years, were at times so exacting that he was obliged to decline (after the restoration of Lord Baltimore's government in 1658) the position of a commisioner of Anne Arundel Co.He was, perhaps, a member of the Governor's council at the time of his death.

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From http://thecityobserver.org/scarborough/b27402.htm#P27402 :

2. Sophia Ewell SCARBOROUGH * was born in 1613 in Anne Arundel, Maryland. She lived in Plantation Ewengton, Maryland. She died in Annapolis, Anne Arundel, Maryland. She was a 6th g grandmother to Althea Current. She a 2nd great grandmother of Charles F. Carroll of Carrollton Manor. She was a 2nd great grandmother to Margaret Richardson.

Sophia Ewell SCARBOROUGH * and Maj. Richard EWEN * were married about 1625 in Anne Arundel, Maryland. Maj. Richard EWEN * (son of John EWEN and Ann (EWEN)) was born about 1605 in England. He died on 16 Apr 1669 in Annapolis, Anne Arundel, Maryland. He was a 6th g grandfather to Althea Current.

Ida Shirk states in her book "Descendants of Richard and Elizabeth (Ewen) Talbott of West River, Anne Arundel County, Maryland", that the Ewen family settled in Maryland in 1649 and is shown by a land warrant recorded in a book A. B. & H., page 40, Land Office , Annapolis, that on the 17th of May 1650 Major Richard Ewen demanded one thousand acres of land for transporting himself and nine person into this province....He then names these 9 people.

It is not known from where the Ewen's emigrated. There were Ewen's in Scotland and parts of England, and Ewen's were among the earliest settlers of Virginia.

No record of Major Richard Ewen's will, or inventory or administration of his estate has been found. His ten years in Maryland were active and eventful years. During four years he served as a member of the board of commissioners which controlled the affairs of the Colony; at nearly every General Assembly he was one of the representatives of his county, and twice or oftener was speaker of the House of Burgesses: he was sheriff of the county, 1664 and 1665; his duties as an officer of the militia during about five years were at times so exacting that he was obliged to decline the position of a commissioner of Anne Arundel Co. He was survived by a widow and children, the last being Elizabeth, the only one born in Maryland.

Footnote (1) Carolyn Tayloe Davidson Carey, Greenwood Village, County, Cites: (a) "Register of West River Friends," by J.J. Brinkley, "Maryland Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 14,15. (b) "Quakers in the Founding of Ann Arundel County, MD," by J.R. Kelly. (c) "Quaker Records of Southern Maryland," by Henry C. Peden. (2) "Early Settlers of Maryland," by Skordas, p.155. Cites: (a) Liber 4, folio 66. (b) Liber ABH, folio 40. (c) Liber 2, folio 615. (3) "A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland Legislature, 1635-1789" (John Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore) Vol. 1, p.315.; p.678. (4) "The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland," by J.D. Warfield (Kohn & Pollock, Baltimore, 1905) p.10,13,21,26,28,29,37-38,530. ! Birth: (3) Probably in England. Name also spelled EWENS, OWENS, OWINGS. Marriage to Sophia SCARBOROUGH: (1c) (2b,c,3,4) Sophia. Death: (3) 1660. (3) Probably immigrated first to Virginia. (3) 1638: A Richard EWEN had 150 acres in Upper Norfolk County, Virginia. Probably the same Richard. (2b,c,4) 1649: (2b,c) Richard EWEN immigrated to MD with his wife Sophia or Suffa, four children Ann, John, Richard Jr., and Susanna, and four other persons. (3) Came to MD during the Puritan migration from Virginia. His family had close Quaker ties. (4) Richard EWEN brought his wife Sophia, 5 children and 3 servants at his own charges for which he demanded and received 1,000 acres. (3) Moved to Anne Arundel County, MD. (4) Was an immediate neighbor of Edward LLOYD on the Magothy on the north side of the Severn, in the neck, just opposite Annapolis, MD. (4) 1649/50: Owned land adjoining Richard BENNETT and Richard TALBOTT on Herring Creek, Herring Creek Hundred, Anne Arundel County, MD. (4) 1650: Received a patent to 1,000 acres for bringing settlers to MD in 1649. (3) Lived in Calvert County, MD. Had rights to 1,000 acres. (3) Planter. (4) 1654, 22 Jul: The Commissioners BENNETT and CLAIBORNE, then at Patuxent, ordered that for the public administration of justice, Capt. William FULLER, Mr. Richard PRESTON, Mr. William DURAND, Mr. Edward LLOYD, Capt. John SMITH, Mr. Leonard STRONG, Mr. John LAWSON, Mr. John HATCH, Mr. Richard WELLS and Mr. Richard EWEN - with the first 3 of the Quorum - were empowered to call an assembly at the Patuxent, the home of Col. PRESTON, but to all who bore arms against Parliament or were of the Roman Catholic faith were to be deprived of vote. (4) 1654, 20 Oct: The assembly met at Patuxent and sat as one house. It was then declared that "henceforth all power in this province his held by the Protector and Parliament," and that "no Catholic can be protected in his faith, but be restrained from the exercise thereof." This rebellious act meant war. (3) 1654: Represented Patuxent (Calvert County,) in the MD Assembly. (3) 1654-1657/8: A primary leader in MD under the BENNETT-CLAIBORNE commission. (3) 1654-1657/8: Member of Parliamentary Commission. (3) 1654-1657/8: Justice of the Provincial Court. (3) 1654-1657/8: Captain. (4) 1755, Mar: After the Battle of the Severn, in which the forces of Lord Baltimore under Gov. STONE were defeated by the Parliamentary forces of the Puritans of Anne Arundel County, Gov. STONE and most of his party were transported over the Severn River to a fort at Anne Arundel, where they were kept prisoners. After about 3 days, Capt. FULLER, William BURGESS, Richard EWEN, Leonard STRONG, William DURAND, Roger HEAMANS, John BROWNE, John CUTS, Richard SMITH, one THOMAS, and one BESSON, Samson WARREN, Thomas MEARS and one CROUCH sat in a council of war, and there condemned Gov. STONE, Col. John PRICE, Mr. Job CHANDLER, Mr. William ELTONHEAD, Mr. Robert CLARK, Nicholas GEYTHER, Capt. William EVANS, Capt. William LEWIS, Mr. John LEGAT, and John PEDRO to die, and not long afterward they sequestered all the estates of those of Lord Baltimore's council and other officers there. (4) 1656: Lord Baltimore regained his authority over MD due to the intercession of the English Committee of Trade, provided Josias FENDALL is chosen the new governor. (4) 1656, Aug: Before Josias FENDALL could organize his government, Severn's Provincial Council, composed of Capt. William FULLER, Edward LLOYD, Richard WELLS, Capt. Richard EWEN, Thomas MARSH, and Thomas MEERES, had FENDALL arrested. He was sentenced "to go to the place from whence he came a prisoner, and there abide in safe custody until the matters of government in the Province of Maryland be further settled by his Highness Lord Protector." FENDALL instead took and oath to abide by the present government until there was a full determination of the matter. (4) 1657, 12 Jul: After the restoration of the Proprietorship, Richard EWEN was appointed Commissioner and Justice of the Peace, Anne Arundel County, MD, by Gov. Josias FENDALL, Jul 23 to be the 1st court day. (3,4) 1657, Jul: He refused to subscribe to an oath because he viewed it as unlawful. (4) Refused to take the oath of Commissioner of Justice. (3,4) 1657.


11 12 13

  Death Notes:

Died intestate.

According to one source, he died about 1658 in the West River Hundred, Anne Arundel County. That may have been a different person.

  Noted events in his life were:

Religion: a Puritan. He may have become a Quaker.
From http://richardsonfamily.homestead.com/Reedrichardson.html :

Information from Quaker records as published in the book "Quakers in The Founding of Anne Arundel County, Maryland" by J. Reaney Kelley (FHC Bk. No. 975.255 F2k, US/Can) indicates as follows: Page 14 - "While there is no proof that Richard Ewen became a Friend, it is known that in 1657 he refused to take an oath and declared it unlawful to do so. His daughter, Elizabeth, married, first, Richard Talbott, and, second, William Richardson both well-known and ardent Friends."

Received: a patent for 150 acres for his own personal adventure and the transportation of two persons, 14 Aug 1638, Upper New Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States). The land was near the head of the west branch of Chuckatuck Creek, E. upon land of Thomas Bush

Residence, 1638, Upper New Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States). Age 30

Conveyed: 150 acres in Upper New Norfolk Co., Virginia to John Wright, Jul 1643.

Removed to: Maryland, 1649. with his wife, Sophia, five children and three servants. He was the second person to settle on the Patapsco River. His was likely one of the 500 families re-settled in Maryland by Governor William Stone in 1649.

Received: Patent for 1000 acres on West River, Abt May 1650, Herring Creek Hundred, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States). He was among the many prominent immigrants from Virginia who settled in the Herring Creek Hundred in 1649 and 1650. His land adjoined Richard Bennett and Richard Talbott on Herring Creek.

Received: land grant of 350 acres south of the Patapsco River, 19 Nov 1652, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States). This may have been the land he called "Ewens."

Received: land grant of 600 acres on the Severn River, which he called "Scotland," 26 Nov 1652, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

Commissioned: as a captain of the militia, 1654-1658, Maryland, (United States).

Served: as Justice of the Provincial Court, 1654-1658, Maryland, (United States).

Appointed: by Bennett and Claiborne as one of the ten commissioners to direct the affairs of Maryland under Oliver Cromwell, 22 Jul 1654, Patuxent Co. (Calvert), Maryland, (United States). "for the conservation of peace and public administration of justice within the province of Maryland" during Cromwell's rule. He represented the Patuxent Hundred in Calvert County.

Enacted: the Act of Recognition, 20 Oct 1654, Patuxent Co. (Calvert), Maryland, (United States). as one of the commissioned members of the General Assembly of Maryland province.

Battle of the Severn, Mar 1655, Maryland, (United States). After the Battle of the Severn, in which the forces of Lord Baltimore under Governor Stone were defeated by the Parliamentary forces of the Puritans of Anne Arundel County (supporters of Cromwell), Governor Stone and most of his party were transported over the Severn to a fort at Anne Arundel, where they were kept prisons. Richard Ewen was one of the men on the council of war that condemned Governor Stone and 9 other men to die, and not long afterward they sequestered all the members of Lord Baltimore's council and other officers there.

Received: a tract of land on the Patapsco River from Lord Baltimore, Surveyor General, Nov 1655, Providence Co. (Anne Arundel), Maryland, (United States). This may have been "Barren Neck," which comprised 150 acres and was inherited by his son Richard.

Restoration: of Lord Baltimore's authority in Maryland, provided that Josias Fendall would be the new governor, 1656, Maryland, (United States). as a result of the intercession of the English Committee of trade

Member: of Severn's Provincial Council, Aug 1656, Maryland, (United States). This Council had Josias Fendall arrested and held him until matters of government in the Province of Maryland were settled by "his Highness Lord Protector" (Cromwell). Fendall took an oath to abide by the present government until there was a full determination of the matter.

Elected: Speaker of the General Assembly (Lower House), 24 Sep 1657, Maryland, (United States). This session was during Cromwell's rule in England (1653-1658).

Governor: of the Colony of Maryland under a commission from Lord Protector Cromwell, 1657, Maryland, (United States).

Appointed: Commissioner and Justice of the Peace by Governor Nathaniel Utie, 12 Jul 1657, Providence Co. (Anne Arundel), Maryland, (United States). Richard Ewen and two others refused to take the oath, alleging that it was unlawful to swear. They were replaced by three other men.

Commissioned: as a major of the militia, 12 Jul 1658, Maryland, (United States).

Delegate: from Anne Arundel County in the House of Burgesses, 1658. Served for many years in the Maryland legislature.

Patent for: "Scotland," 8 Sep 1659, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States). 14 In Anne Arundel Land Grants: Patent to Richard Ewen for transporting into the province, John, Susan, and Ann his children. William Davis, John King, and James Browne his servants....a parcel called Scotland lying on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay near Fishing Creek...by a great marsh,..


Served: as speaker of the Lower House, 28 Feb 1660, Maryland, (United States). This seesion of the Assembly was called at Lord Baltimore's direction after the end of the Cromwell Protectorate.

Patented: "Ewen upon Ewenton," 400 acres on the West River, 1666, "Ewen upon Ewenton", West River, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States). Inherited by his son Richard Ewen.

Surveyed for Charles Calvert, Governor of Maryland, on 1 November 1665.

"Barren Neck" (150 acres), "Ewen upon Ewenton" (400 acres) and "Ewen's Addition" (90 acres) were later purchased by Richard Gallaway.

Acquired: "Ewen's Addition," 90 acres: <Herring Creek Hundred>, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States). 15 Inherited by his son Richard Ewen of Ewenton.


Richard married Sophia Scarborough about 1625 in <England>. (Sophia Scarborough was born about 1613 in <England> and died before 1685 in Maryland, (United States).)


Sources


1 Baltimore: Its History and Its People (Vol. 3. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1912.), pp. 794-795.

2 Richardson, Hester Dorsey, Side-Lights on Maryland History with Sketches of Early Maryland Families. (Vol. 2. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1913.), p. 427.

3 Website:, http://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=3037.

4 Website:, http://www.srdunn.net/Steve%20Dunn.pdf.

5 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #88 Pin #5334 (Rod Blackman).

6 Website:, http://www.tcarden.com/tree/ensor/ensorances.html (Ancestors of Christine Ensor) #2082.

7 Website - Genealogy, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~susanb/SPB%20web%20cards/ps02/ps02_046.htm.

8 Web - Message Boards, Discussion Groups, Email, http://boards.ancestry.myfamily.com/surnames.talbott/243/mb.ashx.

9 Website:, http://thecityobserver.org/scarborough/b27402.htm#P27402.

10 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jhmjr&id=I15021.

11 Website:, http://richardsonfamily.homestead.com/Reedrichardson.html.

12 Glenn, Thomas Allen, Some Colonial Mansions and Those Who Lived in Them (Philadelphia: Henry T. Coates & Co., 1900), pp. 372-373.

13 Pecquet du Bellet, Louise, Some Prominent Virginia Families. (Vol. 4. Lynchburg, Virginia: J. P. Bell Company, 1907.), p. 340.

14 Website:, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~susanb/SPB%20web%20cards/ps02/ps02_046.htm.

15 Website - Genealogy, http://www.pa-roots.org/data/read.php?1108,410563,410563.


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