Humphrey ap Hugh of Llwyn du
(Between 1600/1603-1664)
Elizabeth verch John Powell of Gadfa, Rhiwargor
(1593/1607-)
Captain Rowland Vaughan of Caer-gai, Merioneth
(Abt 1590-1667)
Jane Price Heiress of Trev Brysg
Owen Humphrey of Llwyn du
(1625-1699)
Margaret Vaughan
(1630-1699)

Captain Richard Owings "the Settler"
(1659-1716)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Rachel Roberts

2. Rachel Beale

Captain Richard Owings "the Settler" 1 2 3

  • Born: 7 Mar 1659, <Llwyn du>, Llanllugan, Montgomeryshire, Wales
  • Marriage (1): Rachel Roberts in 1682 in Wales
  • Marriage (2): Rachel Beale Bef Fall 1686 in Dorchester, Maryland, (United States)
  • Died: 14 Nov 1716, Baltimore Co., Maryland, (United States) at age 57

   Other names for Richard were Captain Richard Owen and Richard Owens.

  Research Notes:

This researcher's note from 5 July 2014:

I find it likely that Richard Owings had two wives, both named Rachel. If I am right, it might be thus:
1) Racheal Roberts, m. abt 1682 in England or Wales. She was daughter of Robert Pugh (aka Pugh Roberts/Robert Pugh/Robert ap Hugh)
2) Rachel Beale/Beall, m. 4 Apr 1698 in Dorchester, Massachusetts.

This scenario would make Racheal Roberts the mother of the first set of children (Rachel Owings, Catherine Owings and possibly Richard Owings (Jr.), depending upon the latter's birthdate). Rachel Beale would be the mother of all the others.

As far as I can determine, other researchers are not in agreement about which Rachel was Richard Owings' wife. Most assume that there was only one woman named Rachel. I am taking a more creative approach, as yet not disproven, and am proposing that there were two women who happened to have the same first name. It makes a better story. If it was so, all that is in question is the timing of marriages & births.

Source http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:a41513&id=I0192 lists two wives:
1) Rachel Roberts m. 1682
2) Rachel Beale b. 1662, England, m. 1690 in Maryland

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Several sources mention that Richard Owen was named after Richard Davies of Welshpool, Montgomeryshire, who was a famous Quaker minister. Richard Davies visited Owen Humphrey (Richard's father), along with Owen's brothers Samuel and John, in Llwyngril in 1662 and attests to their faithfulness and that of others in the Quaker community there.
_______

From http://www.angelfire.com/wa2/Gsows/Owens.html :

A : Richard Owen\\Owings, born in Llanllugan, Montgomeryshire, Wales in 1659, Carpenter, Capt, Md Militia 1695, died in Baltimore City, Md, the 14 November 1716, married Rachel Robert, in 1682 in Wales (born in 1663 in Llwyn-dedwydd, Wales and died in 1729 in Baltimore Co., Md).
(Notes : Although it is unclear as to absolute proof pertaining to Richard's Father; I believe it to be Owen Humphrey of Lwynn-du, Merionethshire, Wales. The evidence is circumstantial, however there is a great deal of it.) He had 8 children :

B.1 : Rachel Owings, born in Wales in 1683, died in Baltimore County, Md in May 1761.
B.2 : Richard Owings 2, born in Baltimore County, Md 1688, died in Anne Arundel Co., Md in 1736.
B.3 : Henry Owings, born in Anne Arundel Co, Md in 1690, Carpenter,Planter, died in poss A. A. co., Md6 1764, married Helen Stinchcomb, in 1718 in Balt. Co. Md (born in 1696 in Balt. Co. Md and died 20 in Md, daughter of Nathaniel Stinchcomb and Hannah Randall). He had 7 children. His eldest son Elijah is my line.
C.3.1 : Elijah Owings, born in Long Acre, Balt, Md in 1719, died in Rowan Nc in January 1805, married Hannah Stinchcomb, in 1757 in Baltimore Co. Md (born the 10 January in St. Pauls Parish, Baltimore, M and died in 1810 in Rowan, Nc, daughter of John Stinchcomb and Catherine Mclean). He had 9 children : John is eldest and also my line.

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Excerpt from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/southern/owings.html - M.J.P. Grundy, 26 Jul 2008:

"Our Richard Owen1 identified himself as a carpenter, first of Anne Arundel County, then of Baltimore County. One source says he was born in Virginia and died before 11 February 1726/7. He was married to Rachel (__) by 1701/2.[1]

"As with most of our colonial Maryland ancestors, we find traces of them in legal records of various kinds. For example, Richard had borrowed considerable money from Christopher RANDALL , that was listed in the latter's estate inventory 20 Mar. 1684/5. I don't know if the loans were in order to purchase real estate, or for some other reason. Richard made several real estate transactions. On 12 September 1685 he bought the tract "Range" from Thomas LIGHTFOOT and his wife Rebecca. It was in Anne Arundel County about a mile from the head of the Anne Arundel River, by the line of Richard WARFIELD's land, by a tract called the "Marsh". The next fall Richard sold 384 acres to Jabez PIERPONT, a planter of Baltimore County, for 4,500 pounds of tobacco. Richard's wife released her dower right in it. On 10 October 1694 Richard had surveyed for him 450 acres on the west side of the Patapasco, north side of Col. TAYLOR's land. On 13 March (or August) 1704 Richard conveyed 225 acres out of the total 450 acre "Owen's Adventure" to Col. Edward DORSEY for 40. The tract had originally been patented 10 November 1695. On 1 June 1708 Richard sold another 100 acres from "Owings Adventure" [notice the spelling variations as officially recorded] to Richard ACTON, planter. This tract had been granted to Richard by Lord Baltimore 3 April 1700. Richard's wife, Rachel, gave her consent. On 1 June 1708 Richard owens of Baltimore County, carpenter, conveyed 100 acres, which was part of a larger tract, with Rachel's consent, to Richard ACTON, planter. Another land grant was made to Capt. Richard Owings on 10 September 1725 consisting of 480 acres in Baltimore County named "Owens Outland Plains".[2]


On 16 October 1697 the Assembly passed an "Act appointing Rangers for the defence of this Province". It decreed that fifteen men be raised "to strengthen the Garrison and frontiers at Potomak". They were to be raised proportionately from Anne Arundel, Calvert, St. Mary's, and Charles Counties. The colonels were to "impress them, but if Volunteers can be afterwards procured" the draftees could be released. Richard Owen of Anne Arundel County was made Captain over the new recruits, with Giles HILL of St. Mary's County, the Lieutenant. Two weeks later Richard signed a receipt for arms and equipment received from the Governor: 1 brass "lanthorne", 2 carbines and belts, 2 bayonettes and belts, 2 pair of pistols, 1 brass compass, 1 "prospective" glass, 30 flints, 2 Bibles, 1 Whole Duty of Man, 5 "Catuch boxes" and belts, and $1.00.[3]

"That was not the extent of Richard's military career. He also appeared on a list of soldiers under the command of Col. Ninian BEALE from 6 February 1699 to 6 May 1700. For this he was paid at 3/4d per day, for a total of 15.03.04.[4]


"The only other fact about Richard of which we can be sure, is that he and Rachel were the parents of Samuel, because Samuel had this information entered in the St. Thomas parish register, Garrison Forest, Baltimore County. St. Paul's was the first parish in Baltimore County, and there are four Owings marriages in the St. Paul's Parish register, that let us infer they are all siblings: Robert, Samuel, Joshua, and Ruth. Later, St. Thomas was set off from St. Paul. The web site of "First Families of Anne Arundel County" lists additional children. Some may be conflated from other families.

------------

From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2492193&id=I2555:

Captain Richard Owings, The Settler

Richard Owings, was born Richard Owen, or perhaps Richard ab Owain, at about the time of the restoration of the Stewarts. The place of his birth was probably in the parish of Llanllugan, in the central part of County Montgomery, North Wales. For it is here we find that Cwn Owain or Valley of Owen whose name he was to give to one of his plantations. It lies in the southwestern portion of the parish among the upper waters of the southern branch of the Rhiw.

Of Richard Owings' parents we no nothing, but we may infer that they were yeomen or small gentlefolk, a class then numerous in Wales, and he himself was bred to the trade of carpenter. The origins of his wife, Rachel, are likewise uncertain, but one may suppose that they were married about 1682, for their eldest surviving child, a daughter, was born in the following year. In 1684 they removed to Anne Arundel County, Maryland, and there settled in Middle Neck Hundred, between the Severn and the South Rivers. They may have had relatives in this vicinity, or they may have been attracted to it by the familiar name of its principal river.

Richard Owings probably began in his new home by practicing his trade, but he seems later to have turned more and more to planting. On 12 September 1685, he purchased of Thomas Lightfoot "The Range," 384 acres, which on 9 November 1686 he sold to Jabez Pierpont. On 15 February 1688/9 he surveyed a second tract, near or contiguous to the former, called "Owings' Range" and embracing 162 acres, which he sold on 5 August 1690 to Ambrose Nelson. Both plantations were in Middle Neck Hundred a little to the west of the present Crownsville. Very probably he continued to occupy one or the other until his removal to Baltimore County in 1701-2. Meantime he had surveyed a third tract of land, 10 May 1688, called "Locust Thicket," 384 acres, which lay up south of the Patapsco, on Elk Ridge, in Broad Neck Hundred of Anne Arundel County, near what is now Shipley Station. This he sold, prior to April 1698, to Col. William Holland.

From 18 October 1697 until their disbandment in May 1701 Richard Owings served with the rank of Captain as commander of the mounted rangers enforced at the Little Falls of the Potomac. This was in New Scotland Hundred of Prince George's County, but it is now within the limits of Georgetown, District of Columbia. He and his men were to range the woods in this frontier area, looking out for possibly hostile "foreign Indians." They were to keep liaison with another Maryland garrison, north of the Patapsco, and with a Virginia garrison across the Potomac.

On his retirement Captain Owings settled, prior to Midsummer, 1702, in the Upper Part, North Patapsco Hundred, Baltimore County, where he had previously surveyed, on 10 October 1694, two neighboring plantations. These were "Long Acre", 225 acres, on the north bank of the Patapsco, halfway between Elk Ridge Landing and the present Ellicott City, and "Owings' Adventure," 450 acres, directly back in the woods and at or near the southeast corner of what is now Catonsville. On the former tract he built a small frame dwelling with brick chimneys at either end, a separate kitchen house, several tobacco barns, and other structures. Of the latter tract, he sold the northwest half to Col. Edward Dorsey, 13 August 1704.

After May 1727 this area was a part of Anne Arundel County. Captain Owings died, shortly before 14 November 1716, seized of all "Long Acre," 125 acres of "Owings' Adventure," and all of "The Valley of Owen." His widow occupied the dwelling plantation until her own death a little before 27 May 1729.

Richard Owings, Sr. served as Captain of the Rangers on the Potomac River from October 18, 1697 to May 16, 1701 when the Rangers were disbanded. He was known the rest of his life as Captain Richard Owings.

OWINGS
Richard Owings, born c 1662 in Wales, died intestate 1716 in Baltimore County., is placed as the 4th son of Owen ap Humphrey of Llwyn-du Co., Merionethshire, Wales. He marrried 1682 Rachel ap Robert, daughter of Robert ap Pugh of Llywn-dedwydd. They settled first in the Welsh Tract in Pennsylvania and before 1688 in Anne Arundel County. His widow Rachel Owings died testate 1729 in Baltimore County. From "Maryland Genealogies, A Consolidation of Articles from the Maryland Historical Magazine", page 133.

  Birth Notes:

Most sources give Richard's birth date as 1660, but it may have been 7 Mar 1658/59 and in Wales.

  Death Notes:

Died intestate.

  Noted events in his life were:

Religion: a Quaker.

May have settled: first in the Welsh Tract in Pennsylvania, Bef 1685, Pennsylvania, (United States). This is not verified. They may have settled originally in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

Occupation: Carpenter.

Emigrated: to Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, Bef Mar 1685, Middle Neck Hundred, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States). with his wife and daughter Rachel. They settled between the Severn and the South rivers.

Borrowed: from Christopher Randall, Bef 20 Mar 1685. A considerable amount owed by Richard Owings was listed in the estate inventory of Christopher Randall.

Purchased: "The Range," 384 acres, from Thomas Lightfoot and his wife Rebecca, 12 Sep 1685, Middle Neck Hundred, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States). "The Range" was about a mile from the head of the Anne Arundel River, by the line of Richard Warfield's land, by a tract called the "Marsh."

Sold: "The Range," 384 acres, to Jabez Pierpont for 4500 pounds of tobacco, 9 Nov 1686, Middle Neck Hundred, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States). Richard's wife released her dower right in it. Jabez Pierpont was a planter of Baltimore County.

Surveyed: "Locust Thicket," 384 acres south of the Patapsco on Elk Ridge, 10 May 1688, Broad Neck Hundred, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States). This land lay near what is now Shipley Station.

Surveyed: "Owings' Range, 162 acres near or contiguous to "The Range," 15 Feb 1689, Middle Neck Hundred, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

Sold: "Owings' Range," 162 acres, to Ambrose Nelson, 5 Aug 1690, Middle Neck Hundred, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

Surveyed: "Owings' Adventure," 10 Oct 1694, North Patapsco Hundred, Baltimore (Anne Arundel), Maryland, (United States). This was 450 acres on the west side of the Patapsco, on the north side of Col. Taylor's land, directly back in the woods and at or near the southeast corner of what is now Catonsville. The tract was patented 10 November 1695. After May 1727 this area was a part of Anne Arundel County.

Surveyed: "Long Acre," 225 acres on the north bank of the Patapsco, 10 Oct 1694, North Patapsco Hundred, Baltimore (Anne Arundel), Maryland, (United States). "Long Acre" was in the Upper Part of the North Patapsco Hundred, halfway between Elk Ridge Landing and the present Ellicott City. After May 1727 this area was a part of Anne Arundel County.

Patented: "Owings' Adventure," 450 acres on the west side of the Patapsco River, north side of Col. Taylor's land, 10 Nov 1695, Baltimore Co. (Anne Arundel), Maryland, (United States). Subsequently sold the northwest half to Col. Edward Dorsey on 13 August 1704.

Appointed: Captain of Rangers for the defence of Maryland Province, Abt 18 Oct 1697. Fifteen men were raised "to strengthen the Garrison and frontiers at Potomak."

Served: with the rank of Captain as commander of the mounted rangers enforced at the Little Falls of the Potomac, From 18 Oct 1697 to May 1701, New Scotland Hundred, Prince George's Co., Maryland, (United States). The New Scotland Hundred is now within the limits of Georgetown, District of Columbia, since 1791.

Signed: Receipt for arms and equipment received from the Governor, Abt 30 Oct 1697.

Sold: "Locust Thicket," 384 acres on Elk Ridge, to Col. William Holland, Bef Apr 1698, Broad Neck Hundred, Baltimore (Anne Arundel), Maryland, (United States).

Served: as a soldier under the command of Col. Ninian Beale, From 6 Feb 1699 to 6 May 1700, <Anne Arundel>, Maryland, (United States). Paid 3/4d per day, for a total of 15.03.04.

Patented: "Owings' Adventure," 450 acres on the west side of the Patapsco, 3 Apr 1700, North Patapsco Hundred, Baltimore (Anne Arundel), Maryland, (United States). Granted to Richard by Lord Baltimore. An alternate spelling of this tract was "Owens' Adventure." After May 1727 this area was a part of Anne Arundel County.

Moved, Bef Aug 1702, North Patapsco Hundred, Baltimore (Anne Arundel), Maryland, (United States). Settled in the Upper Part, North Patapsco Hundred on his retirement from the mounted rangers. After May 1727 this area was a part of Anne Arundel County.

Sold: 225 acres out of the 450 in "Owings' Adventure" to Col. Edward Dorsey for 40, 13 Aug 1704, North Patapsco Hundred, Baltimore (Anne Arundel), Maryland, (United States). Transaction may have taken place in March 1704.

Carpenter, 1 Jun 1708.

Sold: 100 acres from "Owing's Adventure" to Richard Acton, planter, 1 Jun 1708, North Patapsco Hundred, Baltimore (Anne Arundel), Maryland, (United States). Richard's wife, Rachel, gave her consent.


Richard married Rachel Roberts, daughter of Robert ap Hugh of Llwyndedwydd and Elizabeth William, in 1682 in Wales. (Rachel Roberts was born in 1660 in Llwyn Dedwydd, Rhos-y-Maen-brych, Llangwm-Dinmael, Denbighshire, Wales and died before 27 May 1729 in Baltimore Co., Maryland, (United States).)


  Marriage Notes:

May have been married in England.

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3152036&id=I608808754 has m. 1682 in Wales.

http://www.owingsstone.com/getperson.php?personID=I270&tree=owingsstone has m. 1683 in Great Britain.

Richard next married Rachel Beale, daughter of Colonel Ninian Beale and Ruth Polly Moore, Bef Fall 1686 in Dorchester, Maryland, (United States). (Rachel Beale was born about 1662 in England and died before 27 May 1729 in Baltimore Co., Maryland, (United States).)


  Marriage Notes:

M.J.P. Grundy found that Richard's wife released her dower right in 384 acres in Anne Arundel County that Richard sold to Jabez Pierpont in fall 1686. This would place the marriage date before that time. Do not know her surname.

Sources


1 Website - Genealogy, http://www.angelfire.com/wa2/Gsows/Owens.html.

2 Website - Genealogy, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/southern/owings.html. M. J. P. Grundy kwg@cwru.edu.

3 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2492193&id=I2555.


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