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Thomas Darcy, of Hornby, Yorkshire
(1565-1605)
Elizabeth Conyers
(Abt 1545-1572)
Edward Darcy, [uncertain]
(Abt 1590-)
Edward Darcy, "the Colonist"
(Abt 1615-Bef 1670)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
Ann

Edward Darcy, "the Colonist" 15,184,187,190,191,192,193,194

  • Born: Abt 1615, <Hockley, Middlesex, England>
  • Christened: 1619, <England> 195
  • Marriage: Ann about 1638 in <Virginia, (United States)>
  • Died: Bef Nov 1670, <Maryland>, (United States)
  • Buried: Virginia, (United States)

bullet   Other names for Edward were Edward D'Arcy and Edward Dorsey.

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bullet  Research Notes:

The pedigree of Edward Darcy, the colonist, is uncertain. Recent DNA evidence points to an Irish, rather than Norman, heritage. The ancestors given here are those found in "traditional" sources, prior to any DNA research.

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From Genealogical and Memorial Encyclopedia of the State of Maryland, pp. 610-611:

"The name Dorsey, was pronounced as if spelt 'Dossy,' and in fact it appears, at times, so recorded. It was also written 'Darcy,' from which circumstance a French origin has been claimed for the family; but there is evidence to indicate that the Maryland Dorseys had been located for a time, at least, in Ireland, prior to their arrival in America. That the family bore arms is proved by the seal to the original will (dated January 7, 1742), of Caleb Dorsey, of Anne Arundel county, which displays: 'on a fess between three wolf heads, a lion passant, guardant.'

"Edward Dorsey, also called 'Edward Darcy, Gentleman,' received in 1650 a warrant for two hundred acres of land in Anne Arundel county, Maryland, and a grant was issued to him on February 23, 1651, for two hundred acres additional... Edward Dorsey died prior to 1681, for on December 6th of that year, Edward Dorsey of Anne Arundel county, Gent., son of Edward Dorsey, late of said county, deceased, conveys his interest in 'Hockley-in-the-Hole' to his brother John Dorsey..."

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http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/index.htm has d. 1659 in Chesapeake Bay, off Kent Island MD. According to the above, that would mean that his son, Edward Jr., arrived in 1661after the original Edward Darcy was deceased. This source states that Edward Darcy was born in England.

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From http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/index.htm:

"Descendants of Edward DORSEY,
boatwright of Lower Norfolk Co. VA and Anne Arundel Co., MD

"Edward Dorsey was among the first settlers of Anne Arundel Co. in 1649, coming from Lower Norfolk Co.,VA with other Puritans and Independents. His ancestry has been the subject of much debate over the last 80 years. Some of this debate can be read in the 1997 issues of the Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin. There are several genealogies on the family of Edward Dorsey. Among these are The Dorsey Family by Dorsey, Dorsey & Ball; Anne Arundel Gentry (first Edition), by Harry C. Newman, Anne Arundel Gentry Volume 2 by Harry C. Newman. Information on the family is also in The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties Maryland by J. D. Warfield (1905). I also believe there is a book about the Georgia desendants of Edward Dorsey. A couple of articles on Edward Dorsey's family have also appeared over the years in the Maryland Historical Magazine. There have also been some Dorsey newsletters including Dorsey Dreams which was published by Mrs. Lois Colette Bennington, and The Dorsey Project that was published quarterly by Mr. Donavon Dorsey of Benton City, Wash. I would recommend that people interested in this family to obtain copies of the above listed books for much in-depth material on the families.>/P>

"While, there is much controversy over the ancestry of Edward Dorsey, recent DNA testing seems to rule out claimed relations to the family of Thomas, Lord D-Arcy. However there are a few facts that should be considered with the history of the time and places. Edward Dorsey was in Lower Norfolk Co VA by 1642, when Cornelius Lloyd claimed land for transporting him to the colony. (The 1642 date is the claim for head rights to receive land for transporation of persons into Virginia, and not necessarily the date the person arrived in Virginia.) Edward Dorsey bought 200 acres in Elizabeth River Parish; in 1642 he bought cattle there (3 head of cattle from John Browne of the Elizabeth River District of Lower Norfolk Co., In the Cort Records B book of Lower Norfolk Co.; 15 April 1648: Henry Nichxxx appointed constable for the head of Eastern Branch beginning at Edward DORSEYS and so Upwards on both sides of said River including Richard Woodman's Plantation. On 20 Oct 1649 Robert Taylor sold Edward DORSEY 200 acres. This land is described by a deed dated 19 October 1647 recorded 31 Oct 1649: William Julian selling 200 acres of land to Robert Taylor of Elizabeth River, Planter, which is part of a patent of 500 Acres as being a Neck of land upon the south turning of ye Said River, East upon a creeke and South upon upon a creek north into ye woods as is bounded in the patent bearing date 22 July 1634, witnesss: Abraham Weekes and William Hancock. He witnessed by Edward E.D Dorsey. quit-claim deed Oct 1649 to Virginia land executed by Thomas Tod (Todd). This deed he signed Edward E D Dorsey

"Edward Darcy granted in November 1650 a warrant for 200 acres of land. & another 200 acres in 1651, half of a warrant for 400 acres he shared with John Norwood (Patents 11/folio 98)

"A little history of Virginia shows that Cornelius Lloyd and his brother Edward Lloyd were involved with Richard Bennet who was a puritan and advocate of the independent church, and endevored to establish a purtian settlement on the south shore of the James River in the late 1630s and early 1640s. It was among these Puritans or memeber of the Independent church with which Edward Dorsey associated. Given that we find Edward buying cattle in 1642, it is doubtful if he was an indentured servant. Rather, I suspect he was among young men and families (including college graduates) that were recruited for the Puritan settlement on the south shore of the James River. At this time England was in the early stages of the English Civil War, with King Charles I taking a hardline stance against the Indendent/Putitan and other sects that were not outside the Church of England.

"The provinical court records tell us of Edward Dorsey's death. 'Att a Court hoden in Anarundel County on tuesday August 2nd 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Showing that hee hauing taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy & some others drowned, neare the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the sd Darcys overseer to take up the same, wch he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the Anarundell & now by his Petn craving for his paynes taking therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudege him. It is ordered that the sd. Thomas Hinson have one hundd pounds of Tob. payd him for the sd paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they bee) that possesse & enjoy the sd Boate.'

"In addition to the information on this site, I know of several people who have created their own web sites with Dorsey Genealogical Information. On the Internet there is a Dorsey Genealogy mailing list at rootsweb.com. The information on this website has been extensively updated in Feb 2009 . It presents material on 8 generations of Dorsey descendants including data from church records, census, graveyards, marriage licenses, and genealogies. The data is not complete. There are Dorseys that seem to belong to this family that have not been connected to Edward Dorsey's lineage. It is also noted that there is another early Dorsey family in Maryland which settled mostly in Calvert Co. and the Eastern Shore, at times this family used the spelling of Dossey as well as Dorsey. This family's progenitors were James, Ralph, and John D-arcy or Dorsey, kinsmen of Richard Preston of the Clifts in Calvert Co. MD. "

Op. cit.:

"Edward Dorsey was among the first settlers of Anne Arundel Co. in 1649, coming from Lower Norfolk Co.,VA with other Puritans and Independents. His ancestry has been the subject of much debate over the last 60 years. Some of this debate can be read in the 1997 issues of the Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin. There are several genealogies on the family of Edward Dorsey. Among these are The Dorsey Family by Dorsey, Dorsey & Ball; Anne Arundel Gentry (first Edition), by Harry C. Newman, Anne Arundel Gentry Volume 2 by Harry C. Newman. Information on the family is also in The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties Maryland by J. D. Warfield (1905). I also believe there is a book about the Georgia desendants of Edward Dorsey. A couple of articles on Edward Dorsey's family have also appeared over the years in the Maryland Historical Magazine. There have also been some Dorsey newsletters including Dorsey Dreams which was published by Mrs. Lois Colette Bennington, and The Dorsey Project being published quarterly by Mr. Donavon Dorsey of Benton City, Wash. I would recommend that people interested in this family to obtain copies of the above listed books for much in-depth material on the families

"In addition to the information on this site, I know of several people who have created their own web sites with Dorsey Genealogical Information. Patricia Summers Smith has placed her lineage on line as has David Dorsey . On the Internet there is a Dorsey Genealogy mailing list at rootsweb.com

"The information on this website has been extensively updated in December 1999. It presents material on 7 generations of Dorsey descendants including data from church records, census, graveyards, marriage licenses, and genealogies. The data is not complete. There are Dorseys that seem to belong to this family that have not been connected to Edward Dorsey's lineage. It is also acknowledged that there is another early Dorsey family in Maryland which settled mostly in Calvert Co. and the Eastern Shore, at times this family used the spelling of Dossey as well as Dorsey."

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From Side-Lights on Maryland History, Vol. 2, pp. 87-91:

"Dorseys of Hockley

"Of all the distinguished officials whose presence with their families and retainers lent luster to the ancient capital [of Baltimore], none are more indelibly impressed upon the history of the Province than the early Dorsey brothers, sons of Edward Darcy who received his first warrant for land from the Lord Proprietary in the year 1650.

"In that year Edward Darcy, the original progenitor of the Hockley branch of the Dorseys of Maryland, received another grant for land adjoining his original warrant, the latter patented in connection with Captain John Norwood.

"These lands were in the year 1667 assigned to George Yate, Edward Darcy having in 1661 been granted a valuable estate in that part of St. Mary's County which in 1663 became a part of the newly erected County of Calvert. This was Teobush Manning patented to Edward Darcy and Thomas Manning, as shown in the Land Warrants, but incorrectly entered in Lord Baltimore's Rent Rolls for Calvert County, as belonging to 'Edward Darby.'

"Hockley-in-the-Hole, originally taken up by Edward Darcy, was in 1664 patented to his sons Edward, Joshua and John, the original patent bearing date August 20, 1664, being still in the possession of the present owner of Hockley, Miss Anne Elizabeth Dorsey, lineal descendant of all three of the original patentees. In the year 1681 'Edward Dorsey, Gent. of Ann Arundell County, Son and heir of Edward Dorsey late of said County deceased' assigned his right to his brother John. The parchment document granting Hockley to the three Dorsey brothers bears the autograph of Charles, third Lord Baltimore, and was given under the Great Seal of the Province."

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From The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland, p. 30:

"South-side Severn settlements were increased in 1662. Matthew Howard, who had come up from Lower Norfolk, Virginia, in 1650, with his neighbor and relative, Edward Lloyd, had died before 1659, but his five sons now came. They were Captain Cornelius Howard, of 'Howard's Heirship and Chance'; Samuel Howard, of 'Howard's Hope'; John Howard, of 'Howard's Interest'' all adjoining near Round Bay. Philip and Matthew were on North Severn. In 1664, the three sons of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant of 1650--relatives of the Howards--took up and patented their father's survey of 'Hockley-in-the-Hole.' They were Colonel Edward Dorsey, Joshua and Hon. John Dorsey, prominent leaders in political movements and representatives in legislative measures."

Ibid., pp. 55-56:

"In the Land Office of Annapolis, may be seen the following warrant, which explains itself:

"'Warrant MDCL, granted to Edward Dorsey, of Anne Arundel Co., for 200 acres of land, which he assigns as followeth; as also 200 acres more, part of a warrant for 400 acres, granted John Norwood and the said Dorsey, dated XXIII of Feb., MDCLI. Know all men by these presents that I, Edward Dorsey, of the County of Anne Arundel, boatwright, have granted, bargained and sold, for a valuable consideration, already received, all my right, title, interest of and in a warrant for 200 acres, bearing date 1650, and also 200 acres more, being half of a warrant of 400 acres--the one half belonging to Captain Norwood, bearing date, 1651, both of which assigned to George Yate.--Edward Dorsey, Sealed.'

"Signed in the presence of Cornelius Howard, John Howard, Oct. 22nd, MDCLXVII, (1667).

"That same year the same Edward Dorsey assigned to Cornelius Howard, his right for land for transporting seven persons into the province. Edward Dorsey and Thomas Manning held a certificate from Thomas Marsh, for 600 acres adjoining Captain Norwood. 'Norwood's Fancy,' held by Captain Norwood, was near Round Bay. 'Dorsey,' held by Edward Dorsey, gave the name to 'Dorsey's Creek,' upon which was located Thomas Gates, whose will of 1659, reads: 'I give to Michael Bellott and John Holloway my plantation. I desire that they give to Edward Dorsey's children free outlet to the woods and spring as formally I have given them.'"

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Ibid., p. 56:

"The following record is taken from 'Our Early Settlers.'--A list of our early arrivels up to 1680.

"'Robert Bullen demands lands for bringing over a number of passengers, amongst whom was Edward Dorsey, in 1661.'

"The same record adds, 'Aug. 25th, 1664, patented to him, John and Joshua Dorsey, a plantation called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," four hundred acres.'

"In 1683, this land was resurveyed for John Dorsey, and found to contain 843 acres. 400 acres first surveyed being old rents remaining new, whole now in the possession of Caleb Dorsey.

"Such is the record of 'Hockley' upon our Rent Rolls, at Annapolis."

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Ibid., p. 11:
[Around 1650] Nicholas Wyatt surveyed 'Wyatt's Harbor' and 'Wyatt's Hills,' upon which 'Belvoir' now stands, just south of, and in sight of Round Bay. Adjoining it was Thomas Gates, upon 'Dorsey's Creek,' near 'Dorsey,' taken up by the first Edward Dorsey, in partnership with Captain John Norwood."

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From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

From Lee Garlock:

Edward DORSEY/D'ARCY died in 1659 in Chesapeake Bay, off Kent Island MD. He was born in England. Was in Lower Norfolk Co VA by 1642, when Cornelius Lloyd claimed land for transporting him to the colony.

From Anne Arundel Gentry:
1642 - He bought 200 acres in Elizabeth River Parish; bought cattle there (3 head of cattle from John Browne of the Elizabeth River District of Lower Norfolk Co. [Lower Norfolk County Recrds, Book A, part III, page 36, source cited in Maryland Genealogies.]

From Maryland Genealogies, p. 387: Cites proof that Cornelius Lloyd used Edward Dorsey's headright as early as December 15, 1642.

Anne Arundel Gentry:
October 1649 - Witnessed by mark E.D. a quit-claim deed to Virginia land executed by Thomas Tod (Todd) in favor of James Allard, Abraham Parrott and Alexander Hall.. This deed he signed Edward E D Dorsey [Lower Norfolk County Records, Book B, page 134, source cited in Maryland Genealogies . All this suggests that Edward Dorsey was in Virginia for the seven years between the 1642 purchase from Browne and the 1649 quit claim.]

November 1650 - Edward Darcy granted a warrant for 200 acres of land and another 200 acres in 1651, half of a warrant for 400 acres he shared with John Norwood (Patents 11/folio 98)

1658 - Robert Clarkson, a Quaker convert, states in a letter of Ann Dorsey and her husband, both Converts (to Quakerism), Ann had abundant grace, but he doubted that her husband would stick to the faith. According to Newman, a letter of Thomas Hart dated 28 of the 2nd inst 1658 London, in which is embodied a letter of Robert Clarkson dtd. 14 of ye 11 mo. 1657 (which would be February) "..& likewise Ann Dorsey in a more larger measure, hir husband I hope abideth faithfull in his measure.."

1659 - Edward drowned off Kent Island. In Anne Arundel Court on 2 Aug. 1659, one
Thomas Hinson petitioned "for compensation for having taken up the boate wherein Edward Darcy and some otheres were drowned neare the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the said Darcy Overseer to take up the same which he did deliuery the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority. . . ." So unsure if the Edward mentioned above may be his son from Prov. Ct. Rec. S.I. f.282 "Att a Court hoden in Anarundel County on tuesday August 2nd 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Shewing that hee hauing taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy & some others drowned, neare the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the sd Darcys overseer to take up the same, wch he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the deliuery of same attAnarundell & now by his Petn craving for his paynes taking therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudege him. It is ordered that the sd. Thomas Hinson have one hundd pounds of Tob. payd him for the sd paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they bee) that possesse & enjoy the sd Boate." [Maryland Archives, Vo. 4, p. 314]

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From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41174:

! Birth: (1d,e) Edward DORSEY was claimed by some as being descended from Sir Norman D'ARCIE cousin of William the Conqueror, and from the Lord D'ARCY family of Hornby Castle. DNA evidence has proven that theory to be incorrect, showing that Edward DORSEY is not related to those families. (1f) The latest DNA results would indicate a likely Irish origin for Edward DORSEY. (2) 1619. England.

Marriage to Ann __: (1a) Ann DORSEY and "hir husband" [not named] mentioned in a 1658 letter. Edward DORSEY was the only DORSEY in Anne Arundel Co., MD at that time who was married. (1b) Some researchers have inaccurately listed her as Ann, daughter of Matthew HOWARD. While Matthew HOWARD did have a daughter named Ann, there is record of her husband being James GRENEFFE, who mentions wife Ann, "brother John HOWARD" and "brother Samuel HOWARD" in his will. (1c) She may have been the daughter of Humphrey BACHE of London, and the aunt of Elizabeth HARRIS, of Quaker fame. (2) Bef. 1646. England.

Death: (1g) Drowned near the Isle of Kent in 1659. (2) 2 Aug 1659. Near Isle of Kent, Anne Arundel Co., MD.

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From http://www.eskimo.com/~bgudgel/gudgarc1 :

36. Edward DORSEY24 was born before 1620 in England.20 He is believed to have been the son of Thomas D'Arcy. He immigrated in 1642 to State of Virginia.25 Edward Darcy/Dorsey lived several years in Virginia. On December 15, 1642, Cornelius Lloyd received a grant of land for bringing 60 persons into the colony of Virginia. Among those named was Edw: _orsey, the first letter of the last name is obliterated. (Minute Book, f 160) (New Eng Hist Gen Vol 47, f 63). On October 7, 1646, Thomas Brown was given 240 acres in Lower Norfolk County due by assignment of the right of 5 persons transported by Cornelius Lloyd, among them Edward Dorsey. (Patents 2, State of Virginia f. 113). He died on Aug 2 1659 in Chesapeake Bay.20 Edward Dorsey drowned in Chesapeake Bay, off the Isle of Kent, Maryland. A petition in the Court records from Prov. Ct. Rec. S.I. f.282 the following: "At a Court holden in Anarundel County on Tuesday August 2nd, 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Showing the hee having taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy and some others drowned, near the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the said Darcy's Overseer to take up the same, which he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the Anarundell and now by his Petition craving for his paynes taken therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudge him. It is ordered that the said Thomas Hinson have one hundred pounds of Tobacco payd him for the said paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they be) that possesse and enjoy the sd Boate." Edward Dorsey, the immigrant, was gentleman and settler, first in Virginia and later in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. At a County Court held on November 3, 1645, at the home of William Shipp, it was recorded tat John Browne of Elizabeth River in the County of Lower Norfolk, VA, planter, had on the 11th of February, 1642 sold unto Edward Darsey of the county aforesaid, planter, three head of Cattle (Vixt) one Cowe aged about seaven yeares of a brinded coulor and marked with a cropp on the right eare and the left eare whole, and a steare of a color as aforesaid aged about one yeare and a halfe and marked with a cropp on the left eare and the right eare slitt allsoe, one heifar calfe brinded as aforesaid aged about three quarters of a yeare and marked with a cropp on both eares and a slitt in one and doe by these presents give graunt, bargaine and sell unto the said Edward Darsey his heirs and ecut(rs) administrator and assignes for ever for a valuable consideration pt in hand paid. Dated the 11th of February, 1642. (Minute Book A.f. 293, Lower Norfolk Co., Portsmouth, VA.) By 1650 Edward Darcy was in Anne Arundel County, Maryland where he was granted a warrent for 200 acres of land and another 200 acres in 1651, half warrent for 400 acres he purchased in partnership with John Norwood. (Patents 11; folio 98). In April 1657 Edward Darcy, (he refers to himself in this document as a "boatwright of Anne Arundel County"), sold to George Yate 200 acres granted to him in November of 1650 and half a warrent of 40 acres granted to himself and Capt. Norwood in February, 1651. In August 1668, Yates re-assigned to Edward Dorsey (son of Edward) 68 acres of above tract and later in the year assigned 60 additional acres called "Darsy." Edward bought 300 acres of land in 1655 from Thomas Marsh or March. By 1658 Edward Dorsey had land in the Province of Maryland. On February 27, 1658, Ensign Thomas Gates, who transported himself into the Province in 1649 was granted a parcell of land called "Gatenby" lying on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay, on the south side of the Severn River and north side of Darcy's Creek. In the will of Thomas Gates made May 2, 1659 he indicates that the Dorsey family was living on a nearby tract of land and desired and willed that his heirs "shall give to Edward Darcey's children a free outlet to the woods and also to the spring an inlet for their cattle as formerly they had in my time (Wills 1, f.105). Due to failure to obtain patents, carelessness of clerks and fire which destoyed early records at Annapolis, it has become virtually impossible to locate the land of Edward Darcy/Dorsey. (Arch of Md, 111, f 250) Descriptions of surveys which were recorded after the fire of 1706, however, show that Thomas Todd was located on the south side of the Severn River between Todd's Creek (later Spa Creek) and Deep Cove Creek which was known as Darcy's Creek in the 1658 surveys. The name of the creek was later changed to Sprigg's Creek, then to Graveyard Creek and finally to College Creek. Information regarding the names of these creeks was furnished by Mr. Trader of the Land Commissioner's Office, Annapolis, Md. To the west and north across Darcy's Creek, which no doubt bears the name of the immigrant, were the tracts taken up by Edward Dorsey and Capt. John Norwood, with the land of Nicholas Wyatt lying between them. Farther up the Severn River near Marshes Creek, later called Hockley Creek, was the land taken up by Matthew Howard. Adjoining this land on the south was the tract called "Wyatt", laid out for Nicholas Wyatt. Nearby was Hockley-in-ye-Hole, taken up by Edward Dorsey and later patented by his three sons, Edward, Joshua, and John Dorsey. The date of the original grant for "Hockley" in ye Hole" (Hole being Old English for Valley) was 1664 and wassigned and sealed by Charles, third Lord Baltimore. That grant was in possession of a descendant having been handed down with the land to the eighth generation. He was married to Ann ---- before 1648.20,26 In 1658 the Quakers came into Maryland spreading their religion among the settlers, claiming as converts, Nicholas Wyatt, Edward Dorsey and Ann, his wife and many others. A letter written by Robert Clarkson, a Quaker convert, to Elizabeth Harris, then in England shows that the Dorseys did embrace the faith. He writes that Ann Dorsey had abundant grace, but he seemed doubtful that her husband would stick to the faith. (MD Hist Mag XXXII, 47). "Quakers in the Founding of Anne Arundel County, Maryland" states that, "Ann and Edward Dorsey, mentioned by Clarkson as 'convinced Quakers' were founders of the Dorsey family of Maryland. Their sons were Edward, Joshua, and John. Edward Dorsey's land, 'Dorsey' was on Dorsey, now College, Creek. He surveyed 'Hockley in Ye Hole,' which was granted to his three sons on January 27, 1663 (Patents, Liber 7 f.378) after his death by drowning. (Dorsey Book)" The list of those convinced of the truth of Quakerism includes, "founding settlers and leading citizens of the county, and some were of armorial families. The list constitutes a high tribute to the labors of Elizabeth Harris, Maryland's first Publisher of Truth." There was an apparent attempt to restrict the activities of Friends in the Province of Maryland. Sometime around 1658 Edward Dorsey took up a tract of land containing 400 acres, lying in Anne Arundel County on the south side of the Severn River and or a branch of Broad Creek. This tract was later patented by his three sons. See Patents 7, f.378.

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From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/southern/dorsey.html:

"Most of the older Dorsey genealogies assume that our immigrant Edward is descended from the Norman D'Arcy family. I must confess to jumping on that bandwagon myself. But new genetic research tosses this out the window. A Dorsey family DNA project that started in 2002 has resulted in an excellent web page <http://www.contexo.info/DorseyDNA/LineageI.htm> that points strongly to an Irish branch of the family that has had no "paper trail" documenting a link to our Maryland emigrant, Edward Dorsey. The Irish cousins date from the nineteenth century, so there must be an older common ancestor from the early seventeenth century, or still farther back. The Anglo-Norman D'Arcy/Dorsey men who have participated in a DNA project are clearly of a quite different genetic stock from Edward and the Irish cousins. My thanks to Rick Saunders, who brought this to my attention. As he explains, "If you go to the Results page <http://www.contexo.info/DorseyDNA/Results800.htm> you can compare the lines of Edward DORSEY, and the French-Norman DARCY line more readily. Not only are the results not close, but their haplotypes (R1b and E3b) are different."[1]

"Of the seven references in sixteenth and seventeenth century British records to Edward Dorsey (with nearly as many spellings), the only one that is at all likely to be our ancestor is No. 16 in the Exchequer Record of the King's Remembrancer: "Edward Darcie -- lycensed April 18th 1632, aged thirteen, to go with his master Richard Gips to Berghen." Translated, this means the young teenager had permission to leave England with Richard Gips, or GIBBS, either as an apprentice, servant, or ward, probably to Bergen op Zoom in the Netherlands. It was easier to get a license to go to Europe than to the new world. It would be relatively easy to travel from the Netherlands to Virginia, perhaps by way of Barbados.[2] However, there is as yet no proof that this is our man. I am unaware of any research of Irish records of the period, looking for an Edward Dorsey.

"One way or another, Edward Dorsey1 managed to emigrate from the British Isles (exactly where, Ireland or England, is unclear) to Virginia. Perhaps he came via by a circuitous route through The Netherlands, or more possibly, he was transported by Cornelius LLOYD (see below). So far I have found no record of when he married his wife, Ann. A common assumption is that she was Ann BACHE, since Ann Do?y was mentioned in the 1662 will of her brother Humphrey Bache, a Londoner who became a Quaker. Humphrey's daughter Elizabeth married William HARRIS in 1649 in St. Mary's Abchurch.[3] Elizabeth Harris became a well-travelled and well-known Friends minister. However, a direct descendant named Edward Dorsey has examined the probate record of Humphrey Bache. He concludes: "The reference to his sister Anne lists her last name as Do?y where the "?" could be a "u" or "n" (quill pens were not reliable) -- but, comparing the letter to others in the document, I can't see how it could be much else."[3a] While misspellings and mis-translations were not uncommon in probate records it seems a bit of stretch to get Dorsey from Douy or Dony.

"In May 1638 another pair of our ancestors, Matthew HOWARD <../southern/howard.html> and his wife Ann, were granted land in Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, on the western branch of the Elizabeth River, south of Broad Creek. In the immediate vacinity were grants to Robert TAYLOR, Edward LLOYD, Richard OWEN, and Cornelius LLOYD. The year before, Matthew Howard had with him "two persons unnamed", one of whom might have been 17- or 18-year old Edward Dorsey. Although a male could own land at the age of 16, obviously Edward did not. In fact, throughout his life he seemed to be curiously careless about registering his land. This may have been because an oath was required, and he may have early felt a scruple against swearing that would eventually find full fruition in the Quaker testimony. It is suggested that young Edward was in Virginia by 1636, or even as early as 1635, and he stayed near Richard Owen and John Howard.[4] For three generations these families stayed together and intermarried.

"There is a 1642 contract for Edward's purchase of three cattle (a cow, steer, and calf), with descriptions of each animal, indicating that he had some disposable wealth and was not indentured. When the County Court met 15 December 1645, at the house of William SHIPP, it ordered Thomas TOD to pay Edward "Darcy" and Thomas HALL forty pounds of tobacco apiece "for theire tyme and charge in attendance of the Court for two days." On 10 December 1649 Edward witnessed a quit-claim deed executed by Thomas Tod; his signature reads "E D: Dorsy".[5]

"References to Edward Dorsey, with a variety of spellings, are found in the land records of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, between 1642 and 1648. On 7 October 1646 Thomas BROWN was given 240 acres in Lower Norfolk County due by assignment of the rights of five persons transported by Cornelius LLOYD, including Edward Dorsey. On 15 December 1642 Cornelius Lloyd received a grant of land for bringing sixty people to the colony, including "Edw:_orsey" -- the first letter is illegible. Edward bought 200 acres in Lower Norfolk County on "a neck of land upon the south turning" of the Elizabeth River. The boundaries were further delimited: going "east upon a creek, and south upon a creek, and north into the woods". Dorsey's tract was on the point of land at the foot of present day Chestnut Street, and on it in the 1930s were the ruins of an old Marine Hospital. The land lies on Ferry Point and was once offered to the fledgling United States as a site for its capital. Dorsey styled himself a "boatwright" (i.e. involved in naval stores, perhaps, rather than actually building ships) and was probably in business with and for his near neighbor, Thomas TOD.[6]

"Apparently a number of settlers in Lower Norfolk County were not members of the established church, but were a variety of dissenters or nonconformists; some were Puritans. A ten-year controversy had raged between Governor BERKELEY and the more vocal Puritans that was both political and religious. When a few Roman Catholics immigrated into the colony in 1642 Berkeley saw his chance. The colony decreed that no "popish recusants" could hold any office. It also decreed that anyone holding office and refusing to take the "oath of allegiance and supremacy" should be dismissed from office and fined 1,000 pounds of tobacco. The following year it was enacted that all ministers must be conformed to the Church of England, and any nonconformists should be compelled to leave the colony.[7]

"Meanwhile farther up the Chesapeake Bay in 1637, Maryland forces had taken over Kent Island, which had originally been an outpost of Virginia. Lord Baltimore gave the settlers full civil and religious rights. In 1648 he specifically invited disgruntled dissenters to move from Virginia to his colony. He appointed the Virginia Protestant, William STONE, (apparently no relation to our William Stone) as his governor. Baltimore patronized the newly settled Protestants, who quickly moved into important political posts in both local and provincial government.[8]


"The lack of freedom of religion in Virginia, coupled with an invitation to move north, led between 400 and 600 settlers to migrate to Maryland, mostly to Anne Arundel and Calvert Counties. The larger group of immigrants, whose religious affiliations are not known, included Edward Dorsey, John NORWOOD <../southern/norwood.html>, Matthew HOWARD <../southern/howard.html>, Thomas TODD, and Nicholas WYATT and their families who settled in and around Annapolis. They had owned land near each other in Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, and soon acquired tracts near each other along the Severn River in Maryland; their children and grandchildren intermarried. However, 15 November 1652 Edward and four others returned to Virginia where Francis FLEETWOOD got a grant of land for their transportation.[9] They soon returned to Maryland.

"In November 1650 Edward Dorsey was granted a warrant for 200 acres in Maryland, and in 1651 for another 200 acres. Lord Baltimore had instituted the English practice of granting and patenting tracts of land under proper names. Acreages named "Norwood", "Howard", "Todd", and "Wyatt" were laid out for other members of the group, with their locations specified in the records. Unfortunately, the location of Dorsey's land was not specified. Before 1655 Edward Dorsey, together with Thomas MANNING bought 600 acre "Theobush Manning" on the west side of Chesapeake Bay, south of Norwood's, north of the Bay. Perhaps because it was incorrectly entered on Lord Baltimore's Rent Rolls as belonging to Edward "Darby", the patent was not issued until 1661. Whenever he acquired it, eventually Edward Dorsey owned land that is now occupied by part of the Naval Academy and Bloomsbury Square in Annapolis.[10]

"In 1655 or 1556 Elizabeth (Bache) HARRIS, a British Friend, came to Maryland and found a receptive audience among the community of dissenters settled along the Severn and Patuxent Rivers, and among the unchurched folks on Kent Island. Many who heard her and worshipped with her were convicted inwardly and convinced of the Truth Friends proclaimed. She was followed in 1657-1658 by Josiah COALE from Bristol, Thomas THURSTON from Gloucestershire, and Thomas CHAPMAN. Among the new Friends in Maryland were Thomas MEARS, Nicholas WYATT, Edward and Ann DORSEY, Robert CLARKSON and his wife, John BALDWIN, Henry CAPLIN, Charles BALYE, Elizabeth BEASLEY, William FULLER, William DURAND, Thomas and William COLE, Henry WOOLCHURCH, and others.[11]

"A letter from Robert CLARKSON, member of the House of Burgesses from Anne Arundel County, to Elizabeth HARRIS, back in England, summarized Elizabeth's work and reported on the condition of local Friends:[12]

'Elizabeth Harris, Dear Heart, I salute thee in the tender love of the Father, which moved thee toward us and I do own thee to have been a minister by the will of God to bear the outward testimony to the inward word of truth in me and others. Of which word of life God hath made my wife a partaker with me and hath established our hearts in His fear, and likewise Ann Dorsey in a more large measure; her husband I hope abides faithful . . .

'We have disposed of the most part of the books which were sent, so that all parts where there are Friends are furnished and every one that desires may have benefit of them; at Herring Creek, Rhoad River, South River, all about Severn, the Brand Neck, and thereabouts the Seven Mountains and Kent. . . . '

"Echoing the political events in England, there had been a coup in Maryland against Lord Baltimore in 1654. But many dissenters, especially in Anne Arundel and Calvert Counties, and on Kent Island, were more loyal to Baltimore than to the new Puritan regime. William FULLER, acting governor after 1654, was convinced upon hearing Elizabeth HARRIS, and became a Friend. By 1658 definitely five, and perhaps as many as eleven of the 24 commissioners had become Quakers. Others had close ties with Friends.[13]

"Then Edward Dorsey was drowned with several other people off the Isle of Kent. On 2 August 1659 the Court paid Thomas HINSON 100 pounds of tobacco for raising the boat in which they had drowned, as desired by Dorsey's overseer. But was this our ancestor? Although the Dorsey family historians assume it was, genealogist Caroline BULKLEY thinks it was some other person with the same name. She discovered a 1667 deed referring to Edward Dorsey, boatwright, a designation never used by his son. Descendant Ed Dorsey, who examined the bill of sale, notes that "the seller declares himself to BE Edward Dorsey but did not use the word 'said' that was typically used when repeating a previous reference (to the purchaser). So we have to conclude that it really was the immigrant OR it was his son (after all they really were both Edward Dorsey). He does not specify that he is heir which he did with later documents. So either the immigrant was the seller OR, more likely, his son impersonated him." Another "curious case was the sale, again by the son, in 1664 of other property owned by his father which he just didn't get around to recording until November of 1670 (six years?). He then calls himself heir of the 'late' Edward Dorsey. So it appears to me that the immigrant was alive in 1667 but had died by November 1670."[13a] More conclusive, perhaps, was a reference by Edward Jr. to land "my father Edward Dorsey [had] from Thomas MARSH in 1661". Edward Jr. stated that his father was living in 1667, but by the time Edward Jr. transferred "Hockley-in-the-Hole" to his brother John in 1681, their father was dead. Edward Dorsey, either father or son, appraised the estate of Thomas TODD 12 May 1677.[14] Thomas was the old companion from Virginia with whom the elder Dorsey had worked on ships.

"The Dorsey family chroniclers found no further records of Ann Dorsey. They assumed she returned to Virginia. I assume she remained in Maryland near her children. Unfortunately the West River Friends minutes do not begin until 1671. Family historian Ed Dorsey thinks she went back to England with the immigrant Edward Dorsey.[15]
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From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41174:

(1) Some researchers have attributed a daughter to Edward DORSEY a daughter Ann who married Nicholas GREENBERRY. There is no evidence that Edward DORSEY had a daughter named Ann. While Nicholas GREENBERRY's wife was named Ann, she could not have been a daughter of Edward DORSEY. Nicholas GREENBERRY did not emigrate from England to Maryland until 1674, at which time he arrived with his wife and two children. (Maryland Patent Liber 18 (Vol. 21):160 FHL microfilm 0,013,071.) Land was claimed in 1674 for Nicholas GREENBERRY, wife, and two children (not named) who were on the ship "Constant Friendship." His wife could not have been the daughter of Edward DORSEY, who had been living in the colonies for over 25 years.


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From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

April 1667 - Edward Darcy, of the County of Anne Arundell, boatwright, sold to George Yate 200 acres granted to Darcy in Nov 1650 and half a warrant of four hundred acres granted to him and Capt. Norwood in Feb. 1651. In Aug 1668, Yates reassigned to Dorsey 68 acres of above tract and later in the year assigned 60 more acres called "Darsy." Edward bought 300 acres of land in 1655 from Thomas Marsh/March. His son Edward sold this tract Nov 6, 1670 to Thomas Manniage of the Cliffs.

A question arises as to whether the Edward Darcy who signed the paper in 1667 was the Edward Darcy who bought and sold land in the 1650s. Caroline Kemper assumes that it is the same person and that a different, unrelated Edward Dorsey died in a boating accident in 1659. Other historians think that Edward Dorsey one bought and sold the property in the 1650s but that his son signed the papers in the 1670s.

From Maryland Genealogies, "The Identity of Edward Dorsey I," by Caroline Kemper Bulkley, 1938, pp. 398-399:

The record in the Land Office (Liber II, [Margin Liber G G] (98)) reads: '(125) Edward Dorsey assigns to George Yate 400 acres: Warrant XI November M.D.C.L. (1650); to Edward Dorsey for 200 acres of land the which he assigned away as followeth; as also 200 acres more part of a warrant for 400 acres granted John Norwood and Edward Dorsey dated xxiiij February MDCLi (1651); said Dorsey of County of Ann [sic] Arundell, Boatwright, consideration already received, all my right, title, interest, claim and demand of an--in a warrant for 200 acres of land bearing date sixteen hundred and fifty [so written out] and also to 200 acres more being the one half of a warrant for 400 acres, the one half belong to Capt. Norwood bearing date one thousand six hundred fifty one unto George Yate, etc.'"

The date of this assignment, duly signed and sealed, is April 23, 1667, and the witness is John Howard, eldest son of the Virginia Matthew and Ann Howard. A year later (August 24, 1668) there is a deed filed from Yate to Dorsey for sixty-eight acres of the above "Dorsey" tract. In the same year one James Connoway assigned back the "right for 1000 acres" to George Yate, who transfers sixty acres to "Darsy." . . . .

It is contended that the Edward Dorsey who signed the records of 1667-1668 may have been the son Edward. This is highly improbable, since Edward Dorsey the younger could not have had land in his own rights from warrants cited of 1650 and 1651, nor did he ever name himself as "boatwright" in the documents known to bear his signature.

Those who deny that the record quoted was signed by Edward Dorsey, Senior, argue from the story many times repeated that he was drowned in 1659. No evidence has ever been produced to prove this: there is an authentic record of an Edward Dorsey who was drowned, but who the person was, or whether the name may be mistakenly recorded cannot be determined.

It is clear that the signer of the 1667-1668 deeds was the father Edward Dorsey, and as further testimony that he was alive after 1659 is a document assigning land--the Bush-Manning tract-- bought by "My father Edward Dorsey from Thomas Marsh in 1661." This same land is later confirmed to Manning in a warrant and power of attorney to Sheriff Stockett from Colonel Edward Dorsey, the son, giving these facts.

bullet  Birth Notes:

Some sources have b. abt 1619

bullet  Christening Notes:

Some source has him christened in 1619 in Queen Caroline Parish-Elk Ridge, Anne Arundel, but this is unlikely for two reasons:
1) He was not yet in North America in 1619
2) Queen Caroline Parish did not exist until 1728

bullet  Death Notes:

Supposed to have drowned with several other people in a shipwreck off the Isle of Kent in the Chesapeake Bay on 2 August 1659. However, some researchers have argued that either a different Edward Darcy drowned or this Edward survived the shipwreck, as land transactions and other documents seem to indicate that he was living until at least 1667, but was deceased in November 1670.

From http://freepages.family.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~rawl/corneliuslloyd.html:
He [Edward Dorsey] died on 2 Aug 1659 in Chesapeake Bay. Edward Dorsey drowned in Chesapeake Bay, off the Isle of Kent, Maryland.

A petition in the Court records from Prov. Ct. Rec. S.I. f.282 the following: "At a Court holden in Anarundel County on Tuesday August 2nd, 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Showing the hee having taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy and some others drowned, near the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the said Darcy's Overseer to take up the same, which he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the Anarundell and now by his Petition craving for his paynes taken therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudge him. It is ordered that the said Thomas Hinson have one hundred pounds of Tobacco payd him for the said paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they be) that possesse and enjoy the sd Boate."

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bullet  Noted events in his life were:

Transported: to Virginia by Cornelius Lloyd, Bef 15 Dec 1642. 196 From http://freepages.family.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~rawl/corneliuslloyd.html:
"On December 15, 1642, Cornelius Lloyd received a grant of land for bringing 60 persons into the colony. Among the list of names was that of Edw: _orsey, the first letter of the name obliterated. (Minute book A, f. 160, Lower Norfolk Co., Portmouth, Va.) (New Eng. Hist. Gen. Reg. Vol. 47, f 63)"

Purchased: 200 acres on 'a neck of land upon the south turning' of the Elizabeth River, 1642, Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States).

Bought: 3 head of cattle from John Browne, 1642, Elizabeth River District, Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States).

Occupation: Boatwright: Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, United States.

Purchased: 200 acres from Robert Taylor, 20 Oct 1649, Elizabeth River District, Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States). 197 This land is described by a deed dated 19 October 1647 recorded 31 Oct 1649: William Julian selling 200 acres of land to Robert Taylor of Elizabeth River, Planter, which is part of a patent of 500 Acres as being a Neck of land upon the south turning of ye Said River, East upon a creeke and South upon upon a creek north into ye woods as is bounded in the patent bearing date 22 July 1634, witnesss: Abraham Weekes and William Hancock.

Witness: Quit-claim deed executed by Thomas Tod (Todd), Oct 1649, Virginia, (United States). 197 Edward signed his name Edward E D Dorsey.

Relocated: From Virginia to Maryland, 1649, Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, United States. Edward Dorsey was among the first settlers of Anne Arundel Co. in 1649, coming from Lower Norfolk Co.,VA with other Puritans and Independents.

Occupation: Boatwright: Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, United States.

Was granted: a warrant for 200 acres from the Lord Proprietary, Nov 1650, Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, (United States). This land, plus the 200 acres added to it in 1651, may have eventually been acquired by Edward Darcy's three sons Edward, Joshua and John on 20 August 1664 and named "Hockley-in-the-Hole."

From http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/index.htm:
"Edward Darcy granted in November 1650 a warrant for 200 acres of land. & another 200 acres in 1651, half of a warrant for 400 acres he shared with John Norwood (Patents 11/folio 98)."

Was granted: an additional 200 acres adjoining the original warrant, 23 Feb 1651, Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, (United States). This was half a warrant of 400 acres. The other 200 acres were granted to Captain John Norwood.

Purchased: "Bush Manning," 600 acres on the west side of Chesapeake Bay, south of Norwood's, in partnership with Thomas Manning, from Thomas Marsh, Bef 1655, St. Mary's Co., Maryland, (United States). The patent for this land was not issued until 1661. The land is now occupied by part of the Naval Academy and Bloomsbury Square in Annapolis. It is called variously "Theobush Manning" and "Bush-Manning."

Purchased: 300 acres from Thomas Marsh/March, 1655, <Anne Arundel>, Maryland, (United States).

Converted: to Quakerism, Abt 1657. He and his wife, Ann, converted, along with many other dissenters along the Severn and Patuxent, after Elizabeth (Bache) Harris came to Maryland in 1655 or 1656. She was followed by Josiah Coale from Bristol, Thomas Thurston from Gloucestershire and Thomas Chapman in 1657 and 1658.

Acquired: 400 acres on the south side of the Severn, possibly on a branch of Broad Creek, Abt 1658, Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, (United States).

Patented: "Bush Manning," 1661. If this is the Edward Dorsey who patented Theobush Manning with Thomas Manning in 1661, he did not die in the Kent Island shipwreck on 2 August 1659. Further, there is a document from his son Edward assigning this tract bought by "My father Edward Dorsey from Thomas Marsh in 1661."

This land was purchased from Thomas Marsh before 1655, but patented in 1661. It comprised at least 600 acres on the west side of Chesapeake Bay, south of Norwood's. The land is now occupied by part of the Naval Academy and Bloomsbury Square in Annapolis. It is called variously "Theobush Manning" and "Bush-Manning."

Assigned: his right to land to Cornelius Howard for transporting seven persons into the Province, 1667. This land transfer may have been done by his son Major Edward Dorsey if this Edward Darcy was already deceased. (He may have died after this date.)

Sold: 200 acres granted to him in November 1650 and 200 acres from February 1651 to George Yate, Apr 1667, Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, (United States).

Bought back: 68 acres of the land he sold to George Yate in April 1667, Aug 1668, Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, (United States).

Bought: 60 more acres called "Darsy" from George Yate, Abt Sep 1668, Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, (United States).


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Edward married Ann about 1638 in <Virginia, (United States)>. (Ann was born about 1609 and died on 21 Jan 1690 in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, (United States) 198.)




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